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October 2012

Binge Drinking

A Serious, Under-Recognized Problem Among Women and Girls

Diagram of a person overlaid with the number 54%, an icon of a group of people with the numbers 1 of 10, and an icon of a steering wheel with 17 times.
Shapes of 8 people1 in 8

Nearly 14 million US women binge drink about 3 times a month

6 drinks6

One in 10 teens in high school drinks and drives.*

bottle and glass of liquor1 in 5

Young drivers (ages 16-20) are 17 times more likely to die in a crash when they have a blood alcohol concentration of .08% than when they have not been drinking.

The percentage of teens in high school who drink and drive has decreased by more than half since 1991,* but more can be done. Nearly one million high school teens drank alcohol and got behind the wheel in 2011. Teen drivers are 3 times more likely than more experienced drivers to be in a fatal crash. Drinking any alcohol greatly increases this risk for teens.

Research has shown that factors that help to keep teens safe include parental involvement, minimum legal drinking age and zero tolerance laws, and graduated driver licensing systems. These proven steps can protect the lives of more young drivers and everyone who shares the road with them.

*High school students aged 16 years and older who, when surveyed, said they had driven a vehicle one or more times during the past 30 days when they had been drinking alcohol.

Problem

Drinking and driving can be deadly, especially for teens

Fewer teens are drinking and driving, but this risky behavior is still a major threat.

  • Drinking and driving among teens in high school has gone down by 54% since 1991. Still, high school teens drive after drinking about 2.4 million times a month.
  • 85% of teens in high school who report drinking and driving in the past month also say they binge drank. In the survey, binge drinking was defined as having 5 or more alcoholic drinks within a couple of hours.
  • 1 in 5 teen drivers involved in fatal crashes had some alcohol in their system in 2010. Most of these drivers (81%) had BACs* higher than the legal limit for adults.

*Blood alcohol concentration. It is illegal for adults to drive with a BAC of .08% or higher. It is illegal for anyone under age 21 to drive after drinking any alcohol in all US states.

Preventing Teen Drinking and Driving: What Works


The percentage of teens in high school, aged 16 years or older, who drink and drive has decreased by more than half.

This chart shows the percentage of high school students ages 16 years or older who drove when they had been drinking alcohol from 1991 to 2011.

Source: Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, United States, 1991-2011

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Who's At Risk?

Some teens in high school drink and drive more than others.

This graphic shows that some teens drink and drive more than others, based on 2011 data. Among White non-Hispanic teens, Black non-Hispanic teens, and Hispanic teens, Hispanic males were most likely to drink and drive.

SOURCE: Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 2011

Percentage of teens in high school, aged 16 years or older, who reported drinking and driving, by state.

This map of the United States shows the percentage of teens in high school, ages 16 years or older, who reported drinking and driving, by state.

SOURCE: Youth Risk Behavior Surveys, 41 states, 2011
Data not available for CA, HI, ME, MN, MO, NV, OR, PA, and WA.

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What Can Be Done

Icon: States and communities

States and communities can:

  • Increase awareness among teens and parents.
  • Strengthen enforcement of existing policies, such as minimum legal drinking age and zero tolerance laws, and graduated driver licensing systems.
Icon: Pediatricians and other health professionals

Pediatricians and other health professionals can:

  • Screen teens for risky behaviors, including the following:
    • Using alcohol, drugs or other substances
    • Driving after alcohol or drug use
    • Riding with a driver who has been using alcohol or drugs
  • Educate parents and teens about the risks of drinking and driving.
  • Encourage parents of new teen drivers to set and enforce the "rules of the road" and consider tools like parent-teen driving agreements.
  • Remind parents to lead by example as safe drivers, starting even before their child is old enough to drive.
Icon: Teens

Teens can:

  • Choose to never drink and drive.
  • Refuse to ride in a car with a teen driver who has been drinking.
  • Know and follow their state’s GDL laws.
  • Follow "rules of the road" in their parent-teen driving agreement.
  • Wear a seat belt on every trip, no matter how short.
  • Obey speed limits.
  • Never use a cell phone or text while driving.
Icon: Parents

Parents can:

  • Understand that most teens who drink do so to get drunk.
  • Recognize the dangers of teen drinking and driving and that teen drivers are at much greater risk of crashing after drinking alcohol than adult drivers.
  • Provide teens with a safe way to get home (such as picking them up or paying for a cab) if their driver has been drinking.
  • Model safe driving behavior.
  • Consider tools like parent-teen driving agreements to set and enforce the "rules of the road" for new drivers. Safe driving habits for teens include the following:
    • Never drink and drive
    • Follow state GDL laws
    • Wear a seat belt on every trip
    • Limit nighttime driving
    • Set a limit on the number of teen passengers
    • Never use a cell phone or text while driving
    • Obey speed limits

Get your copy of CDC's parent-teen driving agreement and learn more about safe teen driving at www.cdc.gov/ParentsAreTheKey.

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Science Behind this Issue


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