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Preventing Teen Pregnancy Infographics

 

Graphic: LARC use among teens ages 15-19 seeking birth control at Title X-funded centers.

Bar chart shows how use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) among teens ages 15-19 has increased in total from less than 1% in 2005 to 7% in 2013 at Title X-funded centers. It also show preference between the two LARC methods intrauterine device (IUD) and implant.


 

MAP: US map shows how the use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) among teens ages 15-19 seeking birth control at Title X-funded centers vary by state.

How does use of LARC vary by state among teens ages 15-19 seeking birth control at Title X-funded centers?

0-5%

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Michigan
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Dakota
  • Utah
  • West Virginia
  • Wyoming

6-10%

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • Illinois
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Minnesota
  • Nebraska
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Wisconsin

11-20%

  • Alaska
  • District of Columbia
  • Hawaii
  • Iowa
  • New Hampshire
  • Oregon
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont
  • Washington

21% +

  • Colorado

 

Infographic: Inforgraphic shows how effective is long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) at preventing pregnancy compared with other birth control commonly used by teens such as birth control and condoms.

How effective is LARC at preventing pregnancy compared with other birth control commonly used by teens?

(In order from Most Effective to Least Effective)

IMPLANT

How to use it:

  • Placed by health care provider
  • Lasts up to 3 years

Chances of getting pregnant: 
Less than 1 out of 100 women*

IUD

How to use it:

  • Placed by health care provider
  • Copper IUD lasts up to 10 years
  • Progestin IUD lasts 3–5 years

Chances of getting pregnant: 
Less than 1 out of 100 women*

PILL

How to use it:

  • Take at the same time each day

Chances of getting pregnant: 
9 out of 100 women*

MALE CONDOM

How to use it:

  • Use correctly every time during sex 

Chances of getting pregnant: 
18 out of 100 women*

Condoms should always be used along with the preferred birth control to protect against sexually transmitted diseases.

*Number of pregnancies per 100 women using the method within first year of typical use.

SOURCE: Trussell J., Contraception, May 2011

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