Cancer and Tobacco Use

Tobacco use causes many cancers

Graphic: Tobacco use* causes cancer throughout the body

Tobacco use* causes cancer throughout the body.

Picture of body identifying 12 tobacco-related cancers.

  • Mouth and throat (oral cavity and pharynx)
  • Voice box (larynx)
  • Esophagus
  • Lung, bronchus, and trachea
  • Stomach
  • Kidney and renal pelvis
  • Pancreas
  • Liver
  • Urinary bladder
  • Uterine cervix
  • Colon and rectum
  • Acute myeloid leukemia

* Tobacco use includes smoked (cigarettes and cigars) and smokeless (snuff and chewing tobacco) tobacco products that, to date, have been shown to cause cancer.

Tobacco-related cancers are higher among some groups:

Table of groups that are more likely to get tobacco-related cancers

Group Photo Description
Men Photo shows two men talking.
African Americans Photo shows an African American woman and man standing next to each other.
People living in counties with low education Photo shows traditional rural classroom with wooden desks and wooden floor.
People living in counties with high poverty Photo shows low-income apartment complex.

SOURCE: CDC Vital Signs, November, 2016


Tobacco-related cancer deaths have decreased over time

Year Male Female
1980 180.4 80.6
1981 179.9 80.7
1982 181.2 81.4
1983 180.4 82.7
1984 181.6 83.8
1985 180.6 84.2
1986 179.6 84.5
1987 179.8 84.9
1988 178.7 85.5
1989 179.3 87.2
1990 180.2 88.0
1991 178.3 88.4
1992 175.7 88.8
1993 174.4 89.0
1994 171.8 88.8
1995 169.5 89.2
1996 166.6 88.5
1997 164.3 88.0
1998 162.1 88.0
1999 158.1 86.4
2000 157.3 87.2
2001 155.7 86.5
2002 153.6 86.3
2003 150.6 85.3
2004 147.6 84.0
2005 146.2 83.2
2006 142.9 82.6
2007 140.3 81.7
2008 138.1 80.4
2009 135.1 78.6
2010 133.7 77.9
2011 130.5 76.6
2012 128.3 75.4
2013 125.4 74.0
2014 122.8 72.9

Tobacco-related cancers across the United States

US map of annual rate of tobacco-related cancers per 100,000 persons (2009–2013)

Category Rank State

Rate

Category 1 1 Puerto Rico

126

126 – 182 2 Utah

131

3 New Mexico

154

YELLOW 4 Colorado

159

5 Wyoming

166

6 Arizona

168

7 California

169

8 Idaho

175

9 Hawaii

177

10 Minnesota

181

11 Virginia

181

12 Montana

182

Category 2 13 Texas

184

183 – 196 14 Oregon

184

15 Maryland

184

ORANGE 16 Nebraska

187

17 South Dakota

187

18 Washington

188

19 North Dakota

189

20 Florida

189

21 Vermont

192

22 Kansas

192

23 Wisconsin

193

24 New Jersey

196

Category 3 25 Georgia

197

197 – 205 26 Alaska

197

27 District of Columbia

198

RED 28 Massachusetts

199

29 South Carolina

199

30 North Carolina

199

31 New York

200

32 Michigan

200

33 New Hampshire

201

34 Connecticut

202

35 Iowa

202

36 Ohio

203

37 Oklahoma

205

38 Rhode Island

205

Category 4 39 Alabama

207

206 – 248 40 Illinois

208

41 Pennsylvania

208

BROWN 42 Delaware

209

43 Missouri

209

44 Indiana

210

45 Tennessee

210

46 Arkansas

210

47 Maine

211

48 Louisiana

221

49 Mississippi

222

50 West Virginia

225

51 Kentucky

248

Category 5 – no data 52 Nevada

More data available at: www.cdc.gov/uscs


ABOUT 1.3 MILLION tobacco-related cancer deaths have been avoided since 1990.

CDC funds 65 Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs (US states, DC, tribes, and territories) to:

Graphic of cancer control continuum highlighting prevention, early detection and care,  survivorship, and good health for all.

PREVENTION

CREATE

Tobacco-free environments to help prevent cancer.

EARLY DETECTION AND CARE

INCREASE

Access to early detection and care for tobacco-related cancers.

SURVIVORSHIP

HELP

Cancer survivors who use tobacco quit.

GOOD HEALTH FOR ALL

IMPROVE

Cancer outcomes for everyone, especially communities with higher tobacco-related cancers and deaths.

SOURCE: CDC Vital Signs, November, 2016

Page last reviewed: July 28, 2017