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Adolescent Vaccination Messaging for Practice Hold Lines

CDC has created messages that can be used for your practices hold lines. These messages, or messages like them, can be heard by parents who call the office and are placed on hold. This turns their wait-time into a time where they can be educated about adolescent vaccination and HPV vaccine.

  • August is National Immunization Awareness Month. Did you know that as your children get older, they are at increased risk for some infections? Also, the protection provided by some childhood vaccines begins to wear off. As you prepare your preteen or teen for back-to-school, protect their health by getting them vaccinated according to the recommended immunization schedule. All boy and girls who are 11 or 12 years old should be receiving vaccines to help protect them against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, HPV cancers, and meningitis. Talk to your child’s doctor or nurse about the vaccinations recommended for your preteen or teen.
  • School will be out soon, and many families will be getting ready for summer vacations, camps, and other fun activities. Before you start your summer, make an appointment for your preteen’s vaccinations. Vaccines help your kids stay healthy, and many states require certain vaccinations before school starts in the fall. While your kids should get a flu vaccine every year, there are three other vaccines for preteens that should be given when kids are 11- 12 years old. Talk to your child’s doctor about Meningococcal, HPV, and Tdap vaccines or visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines/teen today.
  • Did you know that both girls and boys need to get HPV vaccine when they are 11 or 12 years old? Each year, about 17,000 women and 9,000 men are affected by the cancers caused by HPV. You can protect your children with HPV vaccination. If your child hasn't started or finished the HPV vaccine series, make an appointment with their doctor today! Now is the perfect time to ask about HPV vaccine for your preteens and teens.
  • If you haven’t already vaccinated your sons and daughters against HPV, it’s not too late. Ask your child’s doctor at any appointment about getting HPV vaccine. The series is 3 shots over six months’ time and can protect your child from HPV related cancers, such as cervical cancer, later in life. Take advantage of any visit to the doctor—such as an annual health checkup or physicals for sports, camp, or college—to ask the doctor about HPV and the other shots your preteens and teens need. For more information on HPV and HPV vaccination visit www.cdc.gov/hpv.
  • Any visit to the doctor— from an annual health checkup to a physical for sports, camp, or college—can be a good time for preteens and teens to get their recommended vaccinations. There are four vaccines recommended for preteens and teens—these vaccines help protect your children, their friends, and their family members. While your kids should get a flu vaccine every year, Tdap, Meningococcal, and HPV vaccines should be given when kids are 11- 12 years old. Ask your child’s doctor or nurse about the immunizations your preteen or teen need to protect them against serious diseases.
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