NQDW References

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Telephone Quitlines: A Resource for Development, Implementation, and Evaluation. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services: 2004.
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  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs – 2007. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: 2007.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Quitting smoking among adults—United States, 2001– 2010. MMWR. 2011; 60(44):1513-1519.
  3. Fellows, JL., Bush T., McAfee T, and Dickerson J. Cost effectiveness of the Oregon quitline “free patch initiative.” Tobacco Control. 2007; 16(Suppl_1): i47-52.
  4. Fiore MC, Jaén CR, Baker TB, et al. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Clinical Practice Guideline. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. May 2008.
  5. Hollis, JF., McAfee TA., Fellows JL., Zbikowski SM., Stark M., Riedlinger K. (2007). The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of telephone counseling and the nicotine patch in a state tobacco quitline. Tobacco Control 16(Suppl_1): i53-59.
  6. North American Quitline Consortium. (2008). Unpublished Data from the Annual Survey of Quitlines in North Americaexternal icon. Phoenix, AZ. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  7. North American Quitline Consortium. (2009). Exploring a National Data Warehouse for U.S. Quitlines pdf icon[PDF–220 KB]external icon. Report developed by the North American Quitline Consortium National Data Warehouse Workgroup. Accessed on June 10, 2013.
  8. North American Quitline Consortium (2011). Unpublished Data – Results from the 2010 NAQC Annual Survey of Quitlinesexternal icon. Phoenix, AZ. Accessed on June 10, 2013.
  9. Ossip-Klein, D. and McIntosh, S. (2003). Quitlines in North America: Evidence base and applications. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 326(4), 201-205.
  10. Rabius V., Pike KJ., Wiatrek D., McAlister AL. “Effects of frequency and duration in telephone counselling for smoking cessation.” Tobacco Control. 2007; 16(Suppl_1): i71-74.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Key Outcome Indicators for Evaluating Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: 2005.
  12. Task Force on Community Preventive Services. (2011). Increasing Tobacco Use Cessation: Multicomponent Interventions that Include Telephone Supportexternal icon. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  13. Tinkelman D., Wilson SM., Willett J., Sweeney CT. Offering free NRT through a tobacco quitline: impact on utilisation and quit rates. Tobacco Control. 2007; 16(Suppl_1): i42-46.
  14. USDHHS (2000). With understanding and improving health and objectives for improving health. In: Healthy People 2010. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  15. USDHHS (2004). The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Service, Public Health Service, CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.
  16. USDHHS (2006). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.
  17. USDHHS (2010). Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2020external icon. Washington, DC. Accessed [June 19, 2012].
  18. Zhu, S. (2000). Telephone Quitlines for Smoking Cessation. Smoking and Tobacco Control Monograph No. 12. Population Based Smoking Cessation Proceedings of a Conference on What Works to Influence Cessation in the General Population. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health. November 2000.