Cigarette, Cigar, and Marijuana Use Among High School Students — United States, 1997–2013

October 16, 2015 / Vol. 64 / No. 40

 

 


MMWR Introduction

CDC analyzed data from the 1997–2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS) among U.S. non-Hispanic white (white), non-Hispanic black (black), and Hispanic students in grades 9–12 to examine trends in the prevalence of current 1) exclusive cigarette or cigar use, 2) exclusive marijuana use, and 3) any use of the three products. CDC further examined the prevalence of current marijuana use among current users of cigarettes or cigars. During 1997–2013, significant linear decreases occurred in exclusive cigarette or cigar use; however, significant linear increases occurred in exclusive marijuana use. Any cigarette, cigar, or marijuana use significantly decreased overall and among all sex and racial/ethnic subgroups during the study period, whereas marijuana use among cigarette or cigar users increased significantly among all sex and racial/ethnic subgroups. Significant nonlinear trends in exclusive marijuana use and marijuana use among cigarette or cigar users also were identified among black and Hispanic students. Increased exclusive marijuana use and use of marijuana among cigarette or cigar users could undermine success in reducing tobacco use among youths. Closer collaboration between public health professionals to address prevention of tobacco and marijuana use might be beneficial in the development of evidence-based policies and programs to prevent tobacco and marijuana use.

Reducing current use of cigarette, cigar, and marijuana among U.S. youth might be achieved through multifaceted, targeted implementation of evidence-based program and policy interventions, in concert with active engagement of multiple stakeholders, including parents, schools, communities, and the media. Enhanced and sustained tobacco and marijuana use surveillance can help in monitoring trends and patterns of use, including the measurement of progress toward achieving Healthy People 2020 objectives related to the use of these substances among youth. Policy and programmatic efforts may benefit from approaches that focus on reducing the use of tobacco and marijuana among youth.

MMWR Highlights

Prevalence of exclusive cigarette and/or cigar use among white, black, and Hispanic U.S. high school students, 1997–2013

  • The proportion of high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars exclusively decreased from 20.5% in 1997 to 7.4% in 2013.
  • The proportion of white high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars exclusively decreased from 23.0% in 1997 to 9.8% in 2013.
  • The proportion of black high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars exclusively decreased from 10.6% in 1997 to 2.4% in 2013.
  • The proportion of Hispanic high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars exclusively decreased from 15.5% in 1997 to 4.2% in 2013.

Prevalence of exclusive marijuana use among white, black, and Hispanic U.S. high school students, 1997–2013

  • The proportion of high school students using marijuana exclusively increased from 4.2% in 1997 to 10.2% in 2013.
  • The proportion of white high school students using marijuana exclusively increased from 3.0% in 1997 to 7.1% in 2013.
  • The proportion of black high school students using marijuana exclusively increased from 9.2% in 1997 to 16.6% in 2013.
  • The proportion of Hispanic high school students using marijuana exclusively increased from 5.9% in 1997 to 14.2% in 2013.

Prevalence of any use of cigarette and/or cigar or marijuana among white, black, and Hispanic U.S. high school students, 1997–2013

  • The proportion of high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars and marijuana decreased from 46.1% in 1997 to 29.9% in 2013.
  • The proportion of white high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars and marijuana decreased from 48.0% in 1997 to 29.8% in 2013.
  • The proportion of black high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars and marijuana decreased from 38.3% in 1997 to 30.0% in 2013.
  • The proportion of Hispanic high school students using cigarettes and/or cigars and marijuana decreased from 43.4% in 1997 to 30.1% in 2013.

Prevalence of marijuana use among cigarette and/or cigar smokers among white, black, and Hispanic U.S. high school students, 1997–2013

  • The proportion of high school student cigarette and/or cigar smokers who also use marijuana increased from 51.2% in 1997 to 62.4% in 2013.
  • The proportion of white high school student cigarette and/or cigar smokers who also use marijuana increased from 48.8% in 1997 to 56.7% in 2013.
  • The proportion of black high school student cigarette and/or cigar smokers who also use marijuana increased from 63.7% in 1997 to 82.0% in 2013.
  • The proportion of Hispanic high school student cigarette and/or cigar smokers who also use marijuana increased from 58.6% in 1997 to 73.6% in 2013.

 

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