Catalog of Data Resources

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This table has seven columns and 50 rows. Please be sure to scroll to the right and down to access all of the information and resources.

Data Resource and Organization

What data modernization topics are addressed in this resource?

Workforce capabilities and coordination include: (a) data science, epidemiology, and laboratory science capabilities; and (b) training and development programs

What data modernization topics are addressed in this resource?

Data quality, completeness, and timeliness include: (a) coverage of surveillance data, (b) data quality and completeness, and (c) timeliness of data and reporting

What data modernization topics are addressed in this resource?

Health information systems, data sharing, and interoperability include: (a) electronic data exchange; (b) interoperability and data sharing; (c) use of shared services that support data modernization

Jurisdictions Included in the Resource

How were data collected?

How can jurisdictions access this resource?

Catalog of Data Resources

Reconciling Supply and Demand for State and Local Public Health Staff in an Era of Retiring Baby Boomers (2018)

American Journal of Preventative Medicine

Estimates and projections about state and local public health workforce size Does not include information on individual jurisdictions Data extracted from four, related data collections: ASTHO State Profiles (2016), NACCHO Local Health Department Profiles (2016), Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (2016), and CDC and ASTHO Workforce Gaps Survey (2016)

Access article at: Reconciling Supply and Demand for State and Local Public Health Staff in an Era of Retiring Baby Boomers (2018)external icon

Requires paid subscription.

Additional information: Jonathan Leider

Needs Assessment and a Model Agenda for Training the Public Health Workforce, 2000

American Journal of Public Health

Description of training priorities and identified competencies that guided prioritization ME, NY NJ, PA, RI, and VT 78 regional and national public health leaders completed stepwise, individual and collaborative work to assess and prioritize training needs

Access report at Needs Assessment and a Model Agenda for Training the Public Health Workforce, 2000 (PDF - 3 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Additional information: Margaret A. Potter

State Health Agency and Local Health Department Workforce: Identifying Top Development Needs

American Journal of Public Health

Workforce needs and gaps based on occupation, salary, training, and availability of qualified personnel 41 states and 36 local health departments (report does not specify participants) Human resource personnel and senior deputies from 46 state health agencies and senior leaders from 112 local health departments were sent a web-based survey

Access article at: State Health Agency and Local Health Department Workforce: Identifying Top Development Needsexternal icon

Additional information: Angela Beck

Charting a Future for Epidemiologic Training, 2015

Annals of Epidemiology

Information on macro-level trends that influence training needs and required capabilities Does not include information on individual jurisdictions A group of well-seasoned epidemiologists identified relevant literature and conducted in-depth interviews with 15 experienced epidemiologists

Access article at: Charting a Future for Epidemiologic Training, 2015 external icon

Additional information:
Ross C. Brownson

 

2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey

The Arizona Prevention Research Center, University of Arizona

Workforce training and professional development needs, education and experience, relevant training, and place of employment

AZ, CA, CO, CT, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, and WY

Washington, DC

Guam, Puerto Rico, Republic of Palau, and U.S. Virgin Islands

1,767 Community Health Workers from 45 states and 4 territories completed a web-based survey distributed through local, state, and national professional associations, programs, and allies

Access national and state reports at: 2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Surveyexternal icon

Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP) Assessments (2007-2018)

Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL)

Public health laboratory (PHL) workforce strengths and weaknesses, current and future shortages, competencies, and professional development activities and needs Strengths and weaknesses related to surveillance infrastructure for chronic diseases, infectious diseases, and newborn screening Capabilities relevant to integrated management systems for data storage, analysis, retrieval, reporting, and exchange

AL, AZ, CO, CT, DE, FL, IA, ID, IL, IN, ME, MI, MN, MS, MT, NC, NH, NJ, NM, NV, OR, RI, SD, TX, VA, VT, WI, and WY

Fairfax County, VA; Louisville, KY; and Milwaukee, WI

Stakeholders participated in a one-day, facilitated self-assessment process that included discussion of essential services and application of a rubric to determine performance levels

Access reports at: Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP) Assessments (2007-2018)external icon

Additional information: Tina Su

Laboratory Informatics Self-Assessments Tool 2016 Assessment Report

Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL)

PHL workforce informatics competencies, skills, and ability to maintain electronic training records Informatics capabilities related to capturing demographic data, complex statistical analyses, data visualization, spatial data, and data to track sample quality and test turnaround times Informatics capabilities related to sharing data electronically such as electronic laboratory reports, Health Level Seven International (HL7) standards, electronic test orders and results, and other relevant standards

AR, AZ, HI, IA, ID, IN, MN, MO, NC, ND, NE, NH, NY, OK, OR, SC, UT, VA, VT, and WI

Erie County, NY; Fairfax County, VA; Marion County, IN; Philadelphia, PA; and Placer County, CA

Laboratory personnel self-assess informatics capabilities via a web-based application that includes data analysis and visualization modules

Access national summary report at: Laboratory Informatics Self-Assessments Tool (PDF - 2 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Public health laboratory directors can access jurisdiction-level data at:APHL Informatics Self-Assessment Toolexternal icon

Additional information: Rachel Shepherd (240) 485-2796

Focus on Public Health Laboratories: A Workforce Survey Report (2018)

Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL)

PHL workforce demographics, leadership composition, salaries, tenure, recruitment, retention, and satisfaction

50 states

Washington, DC

APHL analyzed data on workplace attitudes and perceptions from web-based surveys of laboratorians distributed via Qualtrics in 2011 and 2016

Access report at: Focus on Public Health Laboratories: A Workforce Survey Report (2018) (PDF - 44 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Additional information:
Lorelei Kurimski
Tina Su

Meaningful Use: Stage 2 Public Health Readiness

Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL)

Information on submission of electronic immunization data, electronic syndromic surveillance data, reportable laboratory results, and cases to disease registries from health care facilities or providers

AK, AL, AR, AZ, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, and WV

Washington, DC

New York City, NY

APHL extracted data from web sites, summarized the information, and noted that jurisdictions are only source of verified data

Access database at: Meaningful Use: Stage 2 Public Health Readinessexternal icon

2018 Training Needs Assessment Survey Report

Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL)

PHL workforce demographics and needs (e.g., training topics, preferred learning methods)

50 states

Washington, DC

Puerto Rico

Laboratorians completed a web-based survey and PHL directors, managers, and other key informants participated in 10 virtual focus groups Access report at: 2018 Training Needs Assessment Survey Report (PDF - 40 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Profile of State and Territorial Public Health Volume 4 (2016)

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)

Information on use of core and informatics competencies, the status of workforce development plans to address training needs and develop core competencies, vacancies and retirement, and use of informatics career series

Information on coverage of population-based prevention services; screening and treatment activities; public health laboratory services; public health registry maintenance; data collection epidemiology, and surveillance activities.

Status of Meaningful Use compliance messages from electronic syndromic surveillance, electronic case reporting (eCR), registries, and electronic laboratory reporting (ELR)

Capabilities related to bidirectional data exchange and reporting

Capabilities related to data sharing across multiple levels

AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV, and WY

Washington, DC

Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Puerto Rico, Republic of Palau, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands

Senior deputies of public health agencies complete a web-based survey and direct certain portions to other personnel.

Access report at: Profile of State and Territorial Public Health external icon

Access jurisdiction profiles at: ASTHO Profile of State Public Health, Volume Fourexternal icon

Access de-identified dataset at: ICPSR Find & Analyze Data (ICPSR 37216)external icon

Additional information: ASTHO

Forces of Change Survey (2017)

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)

Information on staffing and job losses Status of management and promotion of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) for opioid surveillance

All states except RI and HI

Washington, DC

Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands

Web-based survey administered to state and territorial senior health deputies

Access report at: Forces of Change Survey (2017)external icon

Access de-identified dataset at: ICPSR Find & Analyze Data (ICPSR 37223)external icon

Additional information: ASTHO

National Public Health Performance Standards Assessment Version 3.0 - State Public Health System Assessments

Association of State and Territorial Health Organizations (ASTHO)

Workforce expertise and skills in statistics, epidemiology, and information management systems; availability of skilled workers to meet needs; workforce recruitment and retention effectiveness; strengths and weaknesses in core competencies needed to deliver essential services; and initiatives to meet current education needs and improve future education Ability to examine the timeliness and relevance of reports and findings; whether surge capacity is sufficient; use of relevant standards to establish system-wide expectations; and measure and report performance to partners Data reporting and sharing capabilities related to electronic data exchange at multiple levels; public health threats via the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) and compatible systems; electronic communication with state clinical laboratories in one hour; links among environmental, food, blood, veterinary, and forensic laboratories; and participation in the national laboratory response network ASTHO does not maintain a comprehensive list of completed assessments Facilitated group discussion produces data entered in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that generates jurisdiction-level reports

Data are available in individual jurisdictions

Information on the assessment process and tool: ASTHO Accreditation and Performance National Public Health Performance Standardsexternal icon

Additional information: Joya Coffman

Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Prevention and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases (ELC) Cooperative Agreement Quarterly Monitoring Information (2018-2020)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Workforce capabilities and training priorities in five domains: bioinformatics,  epidemiology, health information systems, laboratory, and leadership and management Characteristics of syndromic surveillance system data, facilities that contribute data to the BioSense platform, and data sources used for syndromic surveillance in the jurisdictions Information on integration across surveillance systems and registries in the jurisdiction, data exchange between local and state jurisdictions, and characteristics of integrated surveillance systems, extent to which electronic laboratory reports shared, jurisdiction-specific data reporting requirements, and extent to which PHL can access various health information systems

50 states

Washington, DC

Chicago, IL; Houston, TX; Los Angeles County, CA; New York City, NY; and Philadelphia, PA

American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Puerto Rico, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Republic of Palau, and U.S Virgin Islands

Grantees report the information quarterly via a web-based application

Grantees can access data at: Community Project REDCapexternal icon

2017 Epidemiology Capacity Assessment

Report Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Information on funds available; training needs and opportunities; number of epidemiologists by program area; staffing needs and priorities; and training, hiring, and retention challenges

50 states

Washington, DC

American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and U.S. Virgin Islands

Epidemiologists completed a web-based questionnaire that included multiple question formats

Access report at: 2017 Epidemiology Capacity Assessment Report (PDF - 105 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Access previous report at: 2004 National Assessment of Epidemiologic Capacity: Findings and Recommendations (PDF - 75 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

For jurisdiction level data: CSTE (770) 458-3811

2013 Environmental Health Epidemiologic Capacity Assessment of State and Territorial Health Departments

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Information on number of environmental epidemiologists and activities, functions, and work performed Capacity to disseminate and share data and access information technology support and data from various public health sources

50 states

Washington, DC

6 territories
(report does not specify participants)

41 jurisidictions with at least one environmental epidemiologist completed a web-based or paper survey Access report at: 2013 Environmental Health Epidemiologic Capacity Assessment of State and Territorial Health Departments (PDF - 38 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

2009 National Assessment of Epidemiology Capacity Report Findings and Recommendations

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Information on current workforce, training needs, staff turnover, recruitment, and retention Use of geocodes for address data Electronic laboratory reporting and national surveillance systems use

50 states

Washington, DC

State and territorial epidemiologists completed a web-based assessment that included three modules and distributed an worksheet to each epidemiologist in the health department to obtain more granular information about competency and training issues Access report at: 2009 National Assessment of Epidemiology Capacity Report (PDF - 122 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

2004-2010 National Assessments of Electronic Laboratory Reporting in Health Departments Findings and Recommendations

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Information on number of personnel in place, personnel needed, and training needed related to electronic laboratory reporting activities Barriers to implement electronic laboratory reporting

50 states

Chicago, IL; Denver, CO; Indianapolis, IN; and Los Angeles, CA

Federated States of Micronesia

Participants populate a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet received and returned via email

Access report at: 2004-2010 National Assessments of Electronic Laboratory Reporting in Health Departments (PDF - 4 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

National Assessment of HIV/AIDS Surveillance Capacity (2009)

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Surveillance workforce gaps and needs, training needs and priorities, and salaries for key positions Information on surveillance activities and practices, geographic information systems to map surveillance data, differences in required reporting across jurisdictions Capability to receive electronic laboratory reports and links to state or local databases, electronic or manual

48 states and 2 Territories or Freely Associated States (report does not specify participants)

Washington, DC

Chicago, IL; Houston, TX; Los Angeles, CA; New York City, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and San Francisco, CA

Participants from jurisdictions funded by CDC to conduct case surveillance for HIV/AIDS completed a web-based or paper survey that included 206 questions in 12 domains of work

Access national report at: National Assessment of HIV/AIDS Surveillance Capacity (2009) (PDF - 24 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Survey of HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis and Viral Hepatitis Case Reporting Practices in Tribally-Operated and Urban Indian Health Facilities Final Report on Survey Findings 2004

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Capabilities to identify and report HIV, sexually transmitted disease, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis; and training and staffing needs Information on case reporting methods in jurisdictions (e.g., electronic, paper); current use or interest in electronic case reporting; clinical information systems used; reporting between tribal, state, and local health departments; and reporting barriers Indian Health Service regions: Alaska, Pacific Coast (CA, ID, OR WA), Northern Plains (IA, IN, ND, NE, MI, MN, MT,  SD, WI, WY), Southwest (AZ, CO, NM, NV, UT), and East (AL, FL, LA, KS, MA, ME, MS, NC, NY, OK, PA, RI, SC, TN, TX) Following pre-survey outreach, 66 participants from tribal and urban Indian health facilities completed an anonymous, web-based or paper survey

Access report at: Survey of HIV, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Tuberculosis and Viral Hepatitis Case Reporting Practices in Tribally-Operated and Urban Indian Health Facilities Final Report on Survey Findings 2004 (PDF - 126 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Assessment of Capacity in 2012 for the Surveillance, Prevention and Control of West Nile Virus and Other Mosquito-borne Virus Infections in State and Large City/County Health Departments and How it Compares to 2004

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Personnel needs and  distribution by education level and functional role; access to entomologist or public health veterinarian; training requirements; and laboratory testing capabilities Reporting requirements for human, avian, equine and mosquito surveillance Laboratory reporting to West Nile Virus surveillance program, ArboNET, and state health department

50 states

Washington, DC

Chicago, IL; Houston, TX; Los Angeles, CA; New York City, NY; Philadelphia, PA; and 15 local health departments not identified in the report

Participants from 71 health departments that met specific criteria completed a web-based survey in Epi Info or hard copy sent via email

Access report at: Assessment of Capacity in 2012 for the Surveillance, Prevention and Control of West Nile Virus and Other Mosquito-borne Virus Infections in State and Large City/County Health Departments and How it Compares to 2004 (PDF - 118 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

A National Assessment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Other Chronic Neurologic Conditions State Surveillance Programs
A Report for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) (2009)

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Information on processes to establish surveillance systems that use shared records and challenges related to establishing and maintaining surveillance systems CA, DE, ID, MA, NE, NM, NY, SC, and SD Participants completed a seven question, web-based survey and, for states that conduct amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease surveillance, a telephone interview too Access report at: A National Assessment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Other Chronic Neurologic Conditions State Surveillance Programs
A Report for the ATSDR (2009) (PDF 13 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) State Profiles (2012)

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Joint ELR Taskforce

ELR characteristics that include architecture, system functions, volume of cases received, and number of entities that report (e.g., hospitals, independent laboratories) DE, FL, ID, KS, MA, NE, NJ, NY, and TN Jurisdiction representatives participated in a workgroup that developed the profiles as part of a roadmap for ELR planning, implementation, and maintenance Access report at: Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) State Profiles (2012) (PDF - 26 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

2013 National Assessment of Epidemiology Capacity Findings and Recommendations for Chronic Disease, Maternal & Child Health, and Oral Health

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Workforce capacity in three program areas, number of full-time epidemiologists in place and  needed, and epidemiology competency and training needs Capacity to access public health data sources in a timely manner and software to conduct data analyses Availability of an online, public access, and queryable system to display epidemiologic data

48 states (report does not specify participants)

Washington, DC

Lead epidemiologists in three program areas completed a web-based or paper survey and received information from previous surveys to ensure consistent enumeration methods Access report at: 2013 National Assessment of Epidemiology Capacity Findings and Recommendations for Chronic Disease, Maternal & Child Health, and Oral Health (PDF - 98 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Disaster Surveillance Capacity in the United States Results from a 2012 CSTE Assessment

Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Information on current personnel for disaster surveillance Types of surveillance data used and adequacy of each surveillance system (i.e., mortality, morbidity, and syndromic surveillance) Information on electronic technologies used to collect data, electronic syndromic surveillance systems used, and data sharing activities

50 states

Washington, DC

5 territories (report does not specify participants)

Lead epidemiologists in 53 jurisdictions completed a web-based survey that included 33 questions on five topic areas related to disaster epidemiology in state and territorial health departments Access report at: Disaster Surveillance Capacity in the United States Results from a 2012 CSTE Assessment (PDF - 17 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

2017 National Findings Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS)

de Beaumont Foundation

Information on workforce demographics, satisfaction, engagement, skill gaps and priority training needs, and interests and needs related to data used to assess community health and make decisions

All states except CO, NJ, and OR

Washington, DC

Austin, TX; Baltimore, MD; Boston, MA; Chicago, IL; Cleveland, OH; Columbus, OH; Denver, CO; Detroit, MI; Fort Worth, TX; Houston, TX; Indianapolis, IN; Kansas City, MO; Las Vegas, NV; Long Beach, CA; Los Angeles, CA; Miami, FL; Minneapolis, MN; Oakland, CA; Phoenix, AZ; Portland, OR; San Antonio, TX; San Diego, CA; San Francisco, CA; San Jose, CA; and Seattle, WA

Web-based survey completed by employees in key organizations and random sample of local health departments with at least 25 personnel and serve at least 25,000 people

Access report at: 2017 National Findings Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) (PDF - 16 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Explore findings online at: Explore the Data PH WINSexternal icon

Request data at: PH WINSexternal icon

Pandemic Influenza Readiness Report on Laboratory and Epidemiology Capacity – United States and Territories, 2015

Health Security

Information on capacity to collect epidemiologic and clinical case information, conduct surveillance for influenza mortality, and investigate influenza-associated deaths Information on capacity to transfer laboratory, surveillance, and case investigation data electronically

50 states

Chicago, IL; Los Angeles County, CA; and New York City, NY

Washington, DC

American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Puerto Rico, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Republic of Palau, and U.S. Virgin Islands

62 state, local, and territorial public health departments that participate in the Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program were asked to complete the Pandemic Influenza Readiness Assessment, a web-based survey developed by CDC

Access article at: Pandemic Influenza Readiness Report on Laboratory and Epidemiology Capacity – United States and Territories, 2015external icon

Requires paid subscription.

Additional information:
Luis Lowe

CDC's “Flexible” Epidemiologist: A Strategy for Enhancing Health Department Infectious Disease Epidemiology Capacity (2017)

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

Information on activities, effectiveness, impact, and gaps addressed by Flexible Epidemiologists AZ, CO, GA, KS, ME, MT, TN, and WI Fourteen in-depth interviews with key personnel from eight state health departments

Access article at: CDC's “Flexible” Epidemiologist: A Strategy for Enhancing Health Department Infectious Disease Epidemiology Capacity (2017)external icon

Additional information: Christina Chung

Thinking Beyond the Silos: Emerging Priorities in Workforce Development for State and Local Government Public Health Agencies (2014)

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

Workforce priorities, needs, and characteristics; barriers to improvement; and preferred training delivery methods Does not include information on individual jurisdictions. 31 representatives of public health organizations and federal agencies participated in key informant interviews, collaborative work to summarize priorities identified via data collection, and an in-person meeting to build consensus regarding priorities Access article at: Thinking Beyond the Silos: Emerging Priorities in Workforce Development for State and Local Government Public Health Agencies (2014)external icon

Workforce Competencies in Syndromic Surveillance Practice at Local Health Departments, 2016

Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

Information on self-reported proficiency and years of experience in syndromic surveillance Information on syndromic surveillance systems management and capacity to access data from their own system, a state system, or other source 226 jurisdictions from 31 states (report does not specify participants) Participants completed the web-based Biosurveillance Needs Assessment Survey conducted by the International Society for Disease Surveillance and National Association of County and City Health Officials Access article at: Workforce Competencies in Syndromic Surveillance Practice at Local Health Departments, 2016external icon

MCH Workforce Capacity: Maximizing Opportunities Afforded by a Changing Public Health System (2019)

Maternal and Child Health Journal

Workforce development activities and resources to support proficiency in systems integration, evidence-based decision-making, and change management and adaptive leadership 35 states (report does not specify participants) Data on maternal and child health personnel were extracted from the 2014 Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS)

Access article at: MCH Workforce Capacity: Maximizing Opportunities Afforded by a Changing Public Health System (2019)external icon

Additional information: Ilana Raskind

State Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems—United States, 2007 and 2010

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Information on  capacity to conduct electronic disease surveillance, use interoperable surveillance systems, use integrated surveillance systems, and receive electronic laboratory reports

50 States

Washington, DC

National Electronic Disease Surveillance System coordinators and state epidemiologists completed a  web-based survey conducted by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)

Access report at: State Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems—United States, 2007 and 2010

2012 summary report at: 2012 NEDSS Assessment Summary (PDF - 2 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Additional information: K Turner

National Assessment of Capacity in Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories — United States, 2011

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

Workforce job classifications, number of employees, laboratory capacity by program area, and workforce recruitment and retention 50 states 80 public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratory directors completed a web-based questionnaire that included items on capacity to perform necessary services

Access report at: National Assessment of Capacity in Public Health, Environmental, and Agricultural Laboratories — United States, 2011

Additional information: Matthew L. Boulton

National Public Health Performance Standards Version 3.0 - Local Public Health System Assessments

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)

Workforce composition, gaps, and challenges; credentialing requirements for essential positions; and training needs and opportunities Information on geographic information systems use and geocoded data available; systems to ensure accurate, timely, and unduplicated collection and reporting; and surveillance system capabilities (e.g., access to data sets, compliance with information exchange guidelines) Capabilities related to electronic data sharing and integration of public health data from different sources NACCHO does not maintain a comprehensive list of completed assessments Facilitated group discussion produces data entered in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that generates jurisdiction-level reports

Data are available in individual jurisdictions

Additional information: NACCHO Performance Standards

2018 The Forces of Change in America's Local Public Health System

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)

Information on staffing and training gaps related to information systems Use of syndromic surveillance system or other surveillance systems to report Influenza, food-borne illnesses, and opioid-related events Information on interoperability among information systems and data exchange with hospital emergency departments Does not include information on individual jurisdictions; Data are stratified by local health department size (small, medium, and large) and governance type (state, local, or shared) 591 personnel in local health departments completed a web-based questionnaire in Qualtrics

Access report at: 2018 The Forces of Change in America's Local Public Health System (PDF - 65 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Requests data at: NACCHO Profile Studyexternal icon

2019 National Profile of Local Health Departments

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)

Information on workforce size, staffing patterns, staffing by occupation, jobs lost due to layoffs or attrition, and use of core competencies to support workforce development programs Epidemiology and surveillance services by size of population served Implementation and use of information technology (IT) systems for immunization registries, electronic disease reporting, electronic lab reporting, electronic health records, and health information exchange 49 states (excludes RI because no sub-state public health units at time of study) Following pre-survey outreach, 1,496 personnel in local health departments completed a core, web-based questionnaire and a subset of participants completed one of two supplemental modules too

Access 2019 and 2016 reports at: National Profile of Local Health Departmentsexternal icon

Access public-use data at: National Profile of Local Health Departments, United States, 2016, Restricted-Use Level 1 Data (ICPSR 37144)external icon

The State of Health Informatics Capacity and Needs of Local Health Departments (2016)

National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health at Georgia Southern University

Information on personnel informatics capacity and informatics professional development and training needs Capabilities relevant to health information systems and IT infrastructure;  electronic health records use; data and analytical software use; current informatics activities; and proportion of health departments that create development or selection criteria for information systems Does not include information on individual jurisdictions; data are stratified by local health department size and governance type Following a mini-survey, informatics personnel from a representative sample of 650 local health departments received a web-based survey sent via Qualtrics

Access article at: The State of Health Informatics Capacity and Needs of Local Health Departments (2016)external icon

Access infographic at: The State of Health Informatics Capacity and Needs of Local Health Departmentsexternal icon

Additional information: NACCHO PH Informatics

2010 Tribal Public Health Profile: Exploring Public Health Capacity in Indian Country

National Indian Health Board (NIHB)

Information on the number of employees; occupation types employed; number of staff dedicated to data management, epidemiology, and surveillance activities; and technical assistance and training needs Information on data sharing agreements and shared databases across multiple types of organizations Indian Health Service Areas: Aberdeen, AK, Albuquerque, Bemidji, Billings, CA, Nashville, Navajo, Oklahoma City, Phoenix, Portland, and Tucson 145 directors and administrators of Tribal Health Organizations completed a web-based questionnaire developed by the National Indian Health Board

Access report at: 2010 Tribal Public Health Profile: Exploring Public Health Capacity in Indian Country (PDF - 48 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Additional information: Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle (202) 507-4089

National Assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Workforce, 2011

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)

Information on number of staff employed at national and regional-levels and by discipline; desired professional skills; and training needs Does not include information on individual jurisdictions Sample of employers of occupational safety and health professionals completed one web-based survey and providers of academic training in relevant disciplines completed another web-based survey Access report at: National Assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Workforce, 2011 (PDF - 246 pages)pdf icon

HealthIT.gov Appendix IV - State and Local Public Health Readiness for Interoperability (2020)

Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC)

Readiness for syndromic surveillance systems, electronic laboratory reporting, registry reporting, and electronic case reporting

AK, AL, AR, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, ME, MD, MI, MN, MO, MS, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, TN, UT, VT, WA, WI, and WV

Washington, DC

New York City, NY

ONC compiled and maintains a list of jurisdiction-level websites with relevant information (e.g., local implementation guides, contact information) but the information varies by site Access appendix at: Appendix IV - State and Local Public Health Readiness for Interoperabilityexternal icon

2008 National Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) Snapshot Survey Summary of Results

Oregon Health Authority Acute and Communicable Disease Prevention Section

ELR training needs, personnel available for system maintenance and changes, and desired personnel to implement or maintain ELR Implementation barriers; reporting and interface related challenges; status of ELR components; data sharing with local health departments, national laboratories, and CDC; and NEDSS and Public Health Information Network features such as firewalls and data transport capabilities

AL, AK, AZ, CO, CT, DE, FL, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, LA, ME, MA, MI, MN, MO, MT, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, SD, TN, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, and WI

Chicago, IL; Denver, CO; Indianapolis, IN; Los Angeles, CA; and New York City, NY

Federated States of Micronesia

Invited participants in state and local health departments completed a web-based survey prepared in collaboration with an editorial board that included representatives of state, local, government, and non-government organizations

Access report at: 2008 National Electronic Laboratory Reporting (ELR) Snapshot Survey (PDF - 27 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Additional information: J.A Magnuson

Health Department Accreditation Data (2020)

Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB)

Recruitment, hiring, and retention of qualified public health workers; competency assessments; and training opportunities Information on timely reporting of notifiable diseases, laboratory test results, and case investigation results Data sharing mechanisms between state, local, and tribal health departments

AL, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, ID, IL, IA, KS, LA, ME, MD, MA, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NJ, NM, NY, ND, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, UT, VT, WA, and WI

Houston, TX; Los Angeles, CA; and Washington, DC

Cherokee Nation Health Services, OK; Forest County Potawatomi Health & Wellness Center Community Health Department, WI; and Oneida Nation, WI

Data are extracted from documentation submitted for accreditation purposes

Access jurisdiction-level data at: PHABexternal icon

Additional information: Jessica Kronstadt

Epidemiology Workforce Capacity in 27 Large Urban Health Departments in the United States, 2017

Public Health Reports

Epidemiology workforce structure and leadership; current and ideal staffing and gaps; capacity to address Essential Public Health Services and capacity gaps; and training priorities 27 local health departments (not specified in the report) that are members of the Big Cities Health Coalition (BCHC) BCHC amended the 2017 Epidemiology Capacity Assessment to address local health departments and collected data via a web-based questionnaire Access article at: Epidemiology Workforce Capacity in 27 Large Urban Health Departments in the United States, 2017external icon

Core Courses in Public Health Laboratory Science and Practice: Findings from 2006 and 2011 Surveys

Public Health Reports

Rankings and completion of core subjects related to education and training of laboratory staff

50 states

Washington, DC

Puerto Rico

Public health and environmental laboratory directors completed a web-based survey in 2006 and public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratory managers and directors completed a web-based survey in 2011

Access article at: Core Courses in Public Health Laboratory Science and Practice: Findings from 2006 and 2011 Surveys external icon

Additional information: John Deboy (240)485-2745

Public Health Quality Improvement Exchange (PHQIX)

Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Methods used to implement or improve workforce satisfaction, training, orientation, internships, and retention Processes to address data weaknesses (e.g., completeness, timeliness, geographic coverage) Successful methods for cross-jurisdictional collaboration to improve death data delivery

AL, AZ, CA, CO, CT, FL, GA, ID, IL, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NY, NC, OH, OK, OR, PA, RI, SC, TX, UT, VT, WA, WI, and WY

Counties presented as interactive map

Jurisdictions submit information about public health quality improvement initiatives to an online database to disseminate information and support peer-to-peer knowledge exchange

Access an interactive map of state and county activitiesexternal icon

Searchable database external icon

Additional information: A Harris

Summary Report 2016 Tribal Public Health Workforce Needs Assessment

Rocky Mountain Tribal Epidemiology Center

Description of workforce that includes personnel age, education, salary, employer, funding source for position, language, tribal affiliation, intent to leave, job satisfaction and needs, training needs and gaps, and workforce strengths All tribal health programs and urban health clinics in Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho Directors of tribal health programs and urban health clinics completed a web-based survey received via email and posted on the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council website Report available on request: Dyani Bingham

Texas Health Information Technology Employer Needs Assessment Report (2012)

Texas State University-San Marcos

Information on competencies for Health Information Technology (HIT) personnel; personnel gaps; and barriers to train, hire, and retain qualified personnel

TX

Houston, TX

Urban and rural employers participated in 13 in-person and virtual focus groups and completed a web-based survey Access report at: Texas Health Information Technology Employer Needs Assessment Report (2012) (PDF - 60 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

Tribal Epidemiology Centers Public Health Infrastructure Program (TECPHI) Year 1 Progress Report - FY2018 Building Public Health Capacity and Infrastructure in Indian Country

Tribal Epidemiology Centers

Information on positions funded by the program;  distribution of hires by education, role, and affiliation with a tribe; successes and challenges in  recruitment and hiring; and technical training opportunities Information on partnerships and collaborations to improve data access; number of new or expanded data-sharing agreements; improved communication via data sharing and dissemination activities; technical assistance successes and challenges; and use of new software or systems for data visualization Alaska Native Epidemiology Center; Albuquerque Area Southwest Tribal Epidemiology Center; California Tribal Epidemiology Center; Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Epidemiology Center; Great Plains Tribal Epidemiology Center; Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc. Tribal Epidemiology Center;  Navajo Epidemiology Center; Northwest Tribal Epidemiology Center; Oklahoma Area Tribal Epidemiology Center; Rocky Mountain Tribal Epidemiology Center; United South and Eastern Tribes, Inc. Tribal Epidemiology Center; and Urban Indian Health Institute Data extracted from three sources: TECPHI performance measure data, TECPHI photo narrative project, and Fiscal Year 2018 Annual Performance Reports submitted to the CDC in April 2018

Access report at: Tribal Epidemiology Centers Public Health Infrastructure Program (TECPHI) Year 1 Progress Report - FY2018 (PDF - 64 pages)pdf iconexternal icon

TECPHI awardees can obtain their data from personnel who submitted the information to CDC

Additional information: TECPHI

Enumeration and Characterization of the Public Health Nurse Workforce Findings of the 2012 Public Health Nurse Workforce Surveys

University of Michigan Center of Excellence in Public Health Workforce Studies

Information on public health nurses, including workforce size; recruitment and retention; years of experience; job functions, job title classifications, and program work areas; and training needs

AL, AK, AZ, AR, CA, CO, CT, DE, FL, GA, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, OR, PN, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, WA, WV, WI, and WY

Washington, DC

Boston, MA; Louisville, KY; Milwaukee, WI; New York City, NY; Pasadena, CA; Philadelphia, PA; Richmond, VA; St. Joseph, MO; and Wilkes-Barre, PA

Participants completed one of two web-based surveys: (1) an organizational-level survey distributed to key informants in all 50 states and (2) an individual-level survey distributed to registered nurses in local health departments Access report at: Enumeration and Characterization of the Public Health Nurse Workforceexternal icon

Community Health Worker National Workforce Study, 2007

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration

Workforce use in healthcare delivery, current size and trends, activities that define the occupation, and training opportunities Authors compiled and examined data sources, authors estimated numbers of community health workers based on Census data, employers completed a web-based survey, and employers and community health workers in four states participated in in-depth interviews Access report at: Community Health Worker National Workforce Study, 2007 (PDF - 285 pages)pdf iconexternal icon