Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

The control and prevent diabetes evidence summary banner.

Fast Facts
  • Prediabetes is when you have blood sugar level higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes.
    • About 84 million Americans 18 years and older have prediabetes.
  • In 2017, the estimated medical and non-medical (disability, work loss, premature death) cost of diabetes in the United States was $327 billion.
  • Approximately 95% of diabetes is type 2 diabetes, which can be prevented or delayed with lifestyle change.
Evidence-Based Intervention

Expand access to the National Diabetes Prevention Program’s (National DPP) lifestyle change program, an evidence-based intervention to prevent or delay onset of type 2 diabetes in adults at high risk. The year-long program uses a CDC-approved curriculum, is facilitated by a trained lifestyle coach, and focuses on making realistic behavior changes through healthy eating, increasing physical activity, and managing stress.

What You Can Do to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Healthcare Providers

Learn more about type 2 diabetes by visiting the American Medical Association’s (AMA) Prevent Diabetesexternal icon website.

Payers

  • Offer the National DPP lifestyle change program to your eligible members or beneficiaries by:
    • Applying for CDC recognition to offer the program yourself.
    • Contracting with a CDC-recognized organization already offering the program locally or online.

Employers

  • Offer the National DPP lifestyle change program for your eligible employees by:
    • Applying for CDC recognition to offer the program at your worksite.
    • Contracting with a CDC-recognized organization to offer the program in-person at your worksite or online.

Selected Studies Behind the Intervention

National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP)

A person’s lifestyle influences their chances of developing type 2 diabetes.

Studies show that structured lifestyle programs like the National DPP lifestyle change program can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes in adults who are at high risk for the disease.

The program is based on the science of the Diabetes Prevention Program research study, and several translation studies that followed, which showed that making realistic behavior changes helped:

  • Participants lose 5-7% of their body weight.
  • Adults with prediabetes lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58%.
  • Adults over 60 years old with prediabetes lower their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 71%1.
Resources

National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP)
CDC’s website describing the National DPP, research behind the National DPP, tools, and resources.

National DPP Infographicimage icon
A two page graphic information flyer.

AMA Prevent Diabetesexternal icon
The American Medical Association offers a comprehensive assessment and guided process to support your healthcare organization with implementing a diabetes prevention strategy, including access to an evidence-based diabetes prevention, lifestyle-change program.

Do I Have Prediabetes?external icon
Includes a risk test and general lifestyle tips for prediabetes.

Diabetes Prevention Impact Toolkit
Includes information to project the health and economic impact of the National DPP lifestyle change program on your population at risk for type 2 diabetes.

National Diabetes Prevention Program Coverage Toolkitexternal icon
This online toolkit was developed to provide information about the mechanics of covering the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) lifestyle change program.

National Diabetes Prevention Program Customer Service Center
The Customer Service Center contains a wealth of resources, answers to frequently asked questions, and discussion posts to make it quick and easy for you to find answers on your own and within the National DPP.

1 Li R, Qu S, Zhang P, Chattopadhyay S, Gregg EW, Albright A, et al. Economic evaluation of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs to prevent type 2 diabetes among persons at increased risk: A systematic review for the Community Preventive Services Task Force. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2015. doi: 10.7326/M15-0469.