Outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis Infections Linked to Peaches

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Updated August 27, 2020 at 2:00 PM ET

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, Canadaexternal icon, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)external icon are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to peaches.

Recalls and Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers
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At A Glance
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Do not eat, serve, or sell recalledexternal icon loose or bagged peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company LLC, or food made with these peaches.

  • Check your homes for recalled peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company LLC, and for recalled food made with these peaches, such as peach salsa.
  • Don’t eat recalled peaches. Throw them out or return them to the store.
    • Recalled peaches were sold at different stores under various brand names.
    • Peaches were sold in bags and individually (bulk/loose peaches).
    • If you can’t tell where the peaches are from, don’t eat them. Throw them out.
    • Don’t eat food made with these peaches.
  • Check your kitchen and refrigerator for recalled peaches. If you freeze fresh peaches to use later, check your freezer, too.
  • Companies that recalled peaches or food made with them include Aldi pdf icon[PDF – 2 pages]external icon, Food Lion,external icon Hannaford,external icon Krogerexternal icon (and affiliated retailers: City Market, Fry’s, Food 4 Less, Foods Co., Jay-C, King Soopers, Ralphs, and Smiths), Russ Davis Wholesale,external icon Target,external icon Walmart,external icon and Wegmans.external icon Other retailers also may have sold these peaches.
    • The recalled bulk/loose peaches were sold in grocery stores in various ways, typically loose in bins for shoppers to select.
      • The peaches may have the following stickers with Price Look Up (PLU) numbers on them: 4037, 4038, 4044, 4401, 94037, 94038, 94044, 94401. However, not all peaches with these PLU codes are supplied by Prima Wawona. If you are unsure of the brand or variety of your loose peaches, ask your retailer or supplier or throw them out.
    • Brands and product codes for recalled peaches sold in bags include:
      • Wawona Peaches – 033383322001
      • Wawona Organic Peaches – 849315000400
      • Prima® Peaches – 766342325903
      • Organic Marketside Peaches – 849315000400
      • Kroger Peaches – 011110181749
      • Wegmans Peaches – 077890490488
    • Recalled peach salsa was sold under three brand names and labeled as “Perfectly Peach Salsa”. See the recall noticeexternal icon for more details.
  • Wash and sanitize places where peaches were stored, including countertops and refrigerator drawers or shelves. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.
  • Restaurants and retailers, as well as suppliers, distributors, and others in the supply chain, should clean and sanitize any surfaces that may have come in contact with recalled peaches, including cutting boards, countertops, refrigerators, and storage bins. If peaches from other sources were mixed with recalled peaches, all peaches should be discarded.
Symptoms of Salmonella Infection
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  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 6 hours to 6 days after being exposed to the bacteria.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment.
  • In some people, the illness may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body.
  • Children younger than 5 years, adults 65 years and older, and people with weakened immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.
  • For more information, see Symptoms of Salmonella Infection.

Take these steps if you have symptoms of a Salmonella infection:

  • Talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
  • Report your illness to your local health department.
    • The health department will likely call you for an interview to ask you about foods you ate in the week before you got sick.
  • Assist public health investigators by answering their questions when they contact you.
Latest Outbreak Information
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  • Since August 19, 2020, 10 more ill people and three new states were added to this investigation. The states are Connecticut, Kentucky, and Missouri.
  • As of August 27, 2020, a total of 78 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from 12 states.
    • Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 3, 2020.
    • 23 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.
  • Epidemiologic evidence indicates that peaches are the likely source of this outbreak.
    • In interviews with 45 people, 38 (84%) reported eating fresh peaches in the week before their illness started.
  • On August 25, 2020, Russ Davis Wholesale recalledexternal icon peach salsa and gift baskets made with recalled Prima Wawona peaches. Recalled peach salsa was sold under three brand names and labeled as “Perfectly Peach Salsa”.
  • On August 23, 2020, officials in Canadaexternal icon linked its outbreak to peaches imported from the United States.
  • On August 22, 2020, Wawona Packing Company LLC expanded its recallexternal icon to include bulk, or loose, peaches. The company had previously recalled bagged peaches that were sold under several brand names at a variety of stores.
  • This investigation is ongoing to identify other retailers that may have sold contaminated peaches.
  • CDC will provide more information as it becomes available.
Investigation Details

August 27, 2020

CDC, public health and regulatory officials in several states, Canada, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections linked to peaches.

As of August 27, 2020, a total of 78 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Enteritidis have been reported from 12 states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Map of Reported Cases page.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from June 29, 2020, to August 3, 2020. Ill people range in age from 1 to 92 years, with a median age of 44. Sixty-four percent of ill people are female. Of 67 ill people with available information, 23 hospitalizations have been reported. No deaths have been reported.

Illnesses might not yet be reported due to the time it takes between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks. Please see the Timeline for Reporting Cases of Salmonella Infection for more details.

Whole genome sequencing analysis of 32 bacterial isolates from ill people did not predict any antibiotic resistance. Standard antibiotic susceptibility testing by CDC’s National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) laboratory is underway.

Whole genome sequencing analysis shows that an outbreak of Salmonella Enteritidis infections in Canada is related genetically to this outbreak in the United States. This means that people in both of these outbreaks are likely to share a common source of infection.

Investigation of the Outbreak

Epidemiologic evidence indicates that peaches are the likely source of this outbreak. This investigation is ongoing to identify other retailers that may have sold contaminated peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company LLC.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 45 people with information, 38 (84%) reported eating fresh peaches in the week before their illness started. This percentage is significantly higher than results from a survey pdf icon[PDF – 29 pages] of healthy people in which 20% reported eating peaches in the week before they were interviewed. Of the 31 people who reported information on how the peaches were packaged, 19 (61%) reported buying loose peaches and 12 (39%) reported buying pre-bagged peaches.

FDA’s traceback investigation is ongoing to identify the source of this outbreak and to determine if potentially contaminated product has been shipped to additional retailers.

Consumers should not eat any recalled peaches packed or supplied by Prima Wawona or Wawona Packing Company LLC.

CDC will provide updates when more information becomes available.

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