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Recalls and Advice to Consumers, Restaurants, and Retailers

Final Update

This outbreak appears to be over. Consumers and restaurants should always handle and cook eggs safely to avoid foodborne illness from raw eggs. Wash hands and items that came into contact with raw eggs with soap and water.


Photo of shell eggs.

Consumers should always handle and cook eggs safely to avoid foodborne illness from raw eggs. It is important to handle and prepare all fresh eggs and egg products carefully.

  • When eating eggs at home or in a restaurant, make sure the eggs are cooked until both the yolk and the white are firm. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
  • Wash hands and items that came into contact with raw eggs—including, counter tops, utensils, dishes, and cutting boards—with soap and water.
  • If you have eggs that were recalled:
    • Throw out the eggs or return them for a refund.
    • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where recalled eggs were stored. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.

Contact a healthcare provider if you have:

  • High fever (temperature over 101.5°F).
  • Diarrhea for more than 3 days that is not improving.
  • Bloody stools.
  • Prolonged vomiting that prevents you from keeping liquids down.
  • Signs of dehydration, such as:
    • Making very little urine.
    • Dry mouth and throat.
    • Dizziness when standing up.

Restaurants and retailers should always handle and cook eggs safely to avoid foodborne illness from raw eggs. It is important to handle and prepare all fresh eggs and egg products carefully.

  • Cook eggs until both the yolk and the white are firm. Egg dishes should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F (71°C) or hotter. Scrambled eggs should not be runny.
  • Wash hands and items that came into contact with raw eggs—including, counter tops, utensils, dishes, and cutting boards—with soap and water.
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell recalled eggs.
    • Wash and sanitize any crates or other containers where recalled eggs were held or sold. Use a solution of chlorine bleach and hot water or another appropriate sanitizer, following the instructions provided on the label.
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