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Public Health Accreditation and Prevention Status Reports Crosswalk

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CDC’s Prevention Status Reports (PSRs) align with the expectations of the national accreditation standards established by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) and therefore are a resource to people engaged in efforts relating to the national accreditation standards. In particular, the PSRs can play a valuable role in providing and highlighting data from federal sources for consideration in data-driven efforts (assessment, performance management), as well as pinpointing opportunities for action and providing valuable information that can be used in exploring and developing new policies. For more information on the national public health accreditation program, visit www.phaboard.org or www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth/accreditation.

The following crosswalk shows the PHAB domains and standards that provide the most relevant connections to use of the PSRs.

Domain 1

Domain 1: Conduct and Disseminate Assessments

Conduct and disseminate assessments focused on population health status and public health issues facing the community

Standard 1.1: Participate in or Lead a Collaborative Process Resulting in a Comprehensive Community Health Assessment

Standard 1.1 addresses state/community health assessment activities, which include the requirement to use data from a variety of sources.

Relationship to PSRs:  The data highlighted in the Public Health Problem section of the PSR state reports can contribute to data used to describe the health of a population and contributing factors that affect health outcomes.


Standard 1.3: Analyze Public Health Data to Identify Trends in Health Problems, Environmental Public Health Hazards, and Social and Economic Factors that Affect the Public’s Health

Standard 1.3 requires health departments to analyze health data to identify trends and factors that affect health.

Relationship to PSRs:  Per PHAB guidance, the PSRs offer the opportunity to “use reports produced by CDC” to disseminate data analysis and health findings to various audiences on a variety of public health issues. The public health burden and status data found in the Public Health Problem section of the PSR state reports can be used to support this PHAB standard.


Standard 1.4: Provide and Use the Results of Health Data Analysis to Develop Recommendations Regarding Public Health Policy, Processes, Programs, or Interventions

Standard 1.4 requires health departments to provide and use health data analysis to develop recommendations regarding public health policies, processes, programs, and interventions.

Relationship to PSRs:  The data highlighted in the Public Health Problem and Solutions and Ratings sections of the state PSRs can serve as a source of federal data as required by measure 1.4.2 (using data summaries from federal sources) as long as the state health department demonstrates how it supplemented the PSR data with additional data that it collected and analyzed.

Example of PSR use:

The specific PSR indicator rating data, the public health burden data, or both can be used as secondary data sources when health departments conduct community health assessments. For example, to highlight the burden of tobacco use or the status of tobacco use prevention activities, health departments can use the information in the Tobacco Use PSR’s public health problem section, the status of the state’s implementation of policies to address tobacco use, or both.

Domain 3

Domain 3: Inform and Educate about Public Health

Inform and educate about public health issues and functions

Standard 3.1 Provide Health Education and Health Promotion Policies, Programs, Processes, and Interventions to Support Prevention and Wellness

Standard 3.1 requires health departments to promote population health by providing public health information that encourages the adoption of healthful behaviors and activities. As mentioned in measure 3.1.1, the information must be accurate, accessible, and actionable.

Relationship to PSRs:  The PSR state summaries and state topic reports (specifically, public health burden data and information) can be used as secondary data sources for gathering knowledge about health issues. Information from the policies and practices section of the state topic reports can be a source for evidence-based interventions. The PSRs are a tool for sharing and communicating this information in a clear and effective manner.


Standard 3.2 Provide Information on Public Health Issues and Public Health Functions Through Multiple Methods to a Variety of Audiences

Standard 3.2 requires health departments to have processes and procedures for communicating with external audiences. Processes and procedures should address both accessing information from outside sources and communicating to people outside of the department.

Relationship to PSRs:  The PSR state summaries and state topic reports can be used as external data sources about health issues and as tools for communicating this information to a wide variety of audiences.

Example of PSR use:

PSR topic reports and state summaries can be used to communicate how well the state is implementing select evidence-based policies and practices.

Domain 4:

Domain 4: Engage with the Community

Engage with the community to identify and address health problems

Standard 4.1: Engage with the Public Health System and the Community in Identifying and Addressing Health Problems through Collaborative Processes

Standard 4.1 addresses the need for health departments to engage the community members they serve in an ongoing dialogue about community issues, options, and alternatives. Community ownership increases the effectiveness of health improvement efforts.

Relationship to PSRs:  The PSR state summaries and state topic reports can be used as tools to educate and mobilize partners around specific policies and practices of importance.

Standard 4.2: Promote the Community’s Understanding of and Support for Policies and Strategies that will Improve the Public’s Health

Standard 4.2 addresses the need for health departments to engage the community, governing entities, advisory boards, and elected officials about policies and strategies that will promote the public’s health. Community input and support is an important public health tool in developing and implementing policies and strategies. It is important to gain community input to ensure that a policy or strategy is appropriate, feasible, and effective.

Relationship to PSRs:  The policies and practices highlighted in the Solutions and Ratings section of the state topic reports can be used to foster dialogue about establishing, implementing, and revising policies and practices to improve the community’s health.

Example of PSR use:

PSR topic reports and state summaries can be used as is or repurposed into fact sheets or other communication tools to educate stakeholders about policies and practices that could improve the community’s health.

Domain 5

Domain 5: Develop Public Health Policies and Plans

Develop public health policies and plans

Standard 5.1: Serve as a Primary and Expert Resource for Establishing and Maintaining Public Health Policies, Practices, and Capacity

Standard 5.1 requires that health departments play a central and active role in establishing policies and practices whenever governing entities, elected officials, governmental departments, or others set policies and practices that have public health implications.

Relationship to PSRs:  The PSRs serve as an important resource for health departments working to establish and maintain public health policies and practices. Such work includes monitoring policies under consideration, contributing to deliberations concerning public policy, and informing governing entities and others about the potential impacts of policies being considered. The policies and practices highlighted in the Solutions and Ratings section of the state topic reports can provide valuable information about evidence-based interventions and policies to consider regarding high-priority public health problems.

Standard 5.2: Conduct a Comprehensive Planning Process Resulting in a Tribal/State/Community Health Improvement Plan

Standard 5.2 describes expectations for a health improvement planning process and for the plan that should result. Community members, stakeholders, and partners can use a solid community health improvement plan to set priorities, direct the use of resources, and develop and implement projects, programs, and policies.

Relationship to PSRs:  The policies and practices highlighted in the Solutions and Ratings section of the state topic reports and the state summaries can be used as a secondary data source to identify potential policy changes and to facilitate a dialogue about how to implement those changes.

Standard 5.3: Develop and Implement a Health Department Organizational Strategic Plan

Standard 5.3 addresses the requirement that health departments develop and implement an organizational strategic plan. This strategic plan focuses on the entire health department and provides a guide for making decisions about allocating resources and taking action to pursue strategies and priorities.

Relationship to PSRs:  The PSR state summaries and the state topic reports (specifically, the Public Health Problem and Solutions and Ratings sections) can be used by health departments to inform the priorities and activities included in organizational strategic planning.

Example of PSR use:

Many of the policies and practices in the PSRs are supported by a strong evidence base and can be used when health departments consider interventions to address public health problems through policy development and planning. Interventions supported by The Community Guide or US Preventive Services Task Force include all four Alcohol-Related Harms indicators, the three Motor Vehicle Injuries indicators that address specific laws (seat belt, child passenger restraint, and ignition interlock), the smoke-free ordinances policy under Tobacco Use, and the pharmacist collaborative drug therapy management policy under Heart Disease and Stroke.

Domain 6

Domain 6: Enforce Public Health Laws

Enforce public health laws

Standard 6.1: Review Existing Laws and Work with Governing Entities and Elected/Appointed Officials to Update as Needed

Standard 6.1 addresses the need for health departments to work with the appropriate entities to change law when needed. Public health laws should be current with public health knowledge, practices, and emerging issues. Laws also may need to be revised to be current with societal actions and behaviors that place individuals or groups at health risk.

Relationship to PSRs:  The status of select policies and practices highlighted in the Solutions and Ratings section of the state topic reports (i.e., Alcohol-Related Harms, Food Safety, Motor Vehicle Injuries, and Tobacco Use) can be used to evaluate laws (existing and proposed) for consistency with evidence-based and expert-recommended public health practices.

Standard 6.2: Educate Individuals and Organizations on the Meaning, Purpose, and Benefit of Public Health Laws and How to Comply

Standard 6.2 highlights the responsibility of health departments to educate the public about public health laws and to inform community members about the meaning behind the law, the purpose for the law, the benefits of the law, and compliance requirements.

Relationship to PSRs:  Information in the Solutions and Ratings section of certain state topic reports (e.g., Alcohol-Related Harms, Food Safety, Motor Vehicle Injuries, and Tobacco Use) can be used as a tool for understanding the meaning and purpose of corresponding public health laws.

Example of PSR use:

The PSRs contain a number of legal interventions that are consistent with evidence-based and expert-recommended public health practices; health departments can refer to them when reviewing and investigating laws to address specific public health topics. Examples include laws addressing alcohol use (wine, beer, and distilled spirits excise taxes and dram shop liability); graduated driver licenses; seatbelt use; and tobacco use (cigarette excise taxes and smoke-free policies).

Domain 9

Domain 9: Evaluate and Continuously Improve

Evaluate and continuously improve processes, programs, and interventions

Standard 9.1: Use a Performance Management System to Monitor Achievement of Organizational Objectives

Standard 9.1 requires the health department to use a performance management system to monitor the performance of public health processes, programs, interventions, and other activities to effectively and efficiently improve the health of the population.

Relationship to PSRs:  Health departments can use the rating scales for the policies and practices found in the Solutions and Ratings section of the state topic reports and data in the National Summary as data sources for national expectations (e.g., “green” rating criteria) and information for data-driven processes anticipated through performance management.

Standard 9.2: Develop and Implement Quality Improvement Processes Integrated Into Organizational Practice, Programs, Processes, and Interventions

Standard 9.2 requires that health departments implement a quality improvement program that involves regular use of quality improvement approaches, methods, tools, and techniques, as well as application of lessons learned from evaluation.

Relationship to PSRs:  Health departments can use the rating scales for the policies and practices found in the Solutions and Ratings section of the state topic reports and data in the National Summary as data sources for national expectations (e.g., “green” rating criteria) and information for data-driven processes anticipated through quality improvement.

Example of PSR use:

The “green” rating level for each of the PSR policies and practices offers a goal when users implement any of the interventions in the PSRs. Health departments can use the current rating for a PSR indicator to identify opportunities to improve their state’s status.

Domain 10

Contribute to and apply the evidence base of public health

Standard 10.1: Identify and Use the Best Available Evidence for Making Informed Public Health Practice Decisions

Standard 10.1 highlights the importance of evidence-based public health practice, which requires that a health department use the best available evidence in making decisions and in ensuring the effectiveness of processes, programs, and interventions. Evidence-based practice assures that a health department’s resources are being used in the most effective manner. Health departments should access information about evidence-based practices and apply that information to their processes, programs, and interventions.

Relationship to PSRs:  The policy and practice solutions in the Solutions and Ratings section of state topic reports are a resource for information on what policies and practices are effective for addressing certain public health problems on the basis of established evidence or expert recommendations.

Standard 10.2: Promote Understanding and Use of the Current Body of Research Results, Evaluations, and Evidence-based Practices with Appropriate Audiences

Standard 10.2 emphasizes the importance of effective communication between public health practitioners and the public, governing entities, and other audiences to encourage advocacy for research and to contribute to the science of public health. Health departments should encourage the use of research results, evaluations, and evidence-based practices.

Relationship to PSRs:  The policy and practice solutions in the Solutions and Ratings section of state topic reports can be used to communicate opportunities to implement evidence-based or expert-recommended practices that are based on research.

Example of PSR use:

All of the policies and practices included in the PSRs are supported by scientific evidence or expert recommendations and may be used as a resource to address certain public health problems.

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