Polio Photos

WARNING: Some of these photos might be unsuitable for children. Viewing discretion is advised.

These photos are from CDC’s Public Health Image Library.

CDC Poliovirus Laboratory

CDC scientist using a robotic plate stacker to collect data from the stained serology plates to measure the polio antibodies in blood.

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Scientist using a robotic plate stacker to collect data from the stained serology plates to measure the polio antibodies in blood.

CDC scientist extracting viral RNA from samples of poliovirus genetic material for molecular testing.

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CDC scientist extracting viral RNA from samples of poliovirus genetic material for molecular testing.

CDC scientist is using a sequencing instrument, a Sanger sequencer, to determine the genetic makeup of the isolated poliovirus.

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CDC scientist using a sequencing instrument, a Sanger sequencer, to determine the genetic makeup of the isolated poliovirus.

CDC scientist preparing samples for next generation sequencing during the poliovirus testing process.

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CDC scientist preparing samples for next generation sequencing during the poliovirus testing process.

CDC scientist working with samples to be tested using a real-time PCR machine called a thermocycler to identify the various types of poliovirus.

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CDC scientist working with samples to be tested using a real-time PCR machine called a thermocycler to identify the various types of poliovirus.

CDC scientist performing a virus plaque assay to determine the amount of virus in the cell culture isolates.

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CDC scientist performing a virus plaque assay to determine the amount of virus in the cell culture isolates.

CDC scientist adding a stool sample to the cell culture medium to test for poliovirus.

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CDC scientist adding a stool sample to the cell culture medium to test for poliovirus.

CDC scientist concentrating poliovirus from sewage to grow the virus in cultured cells, and then test it using molecular methods.

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CDC scientist concentrating poliovirus from sewage to grow the virus in cultured cells, and then test it using molecular methods.

Effects of Paralytic Poliomyelitis

A child with a deformity of her right leg caused by poliovirus infection.

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A child with a deformity of her right leg caused by poliovirus infection.

Mother kneeling next to her young child outside their home

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A child in Nigeria with lower limbs deformity due to Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP).

Man with a right leg deformity caused by polio.

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Man with a right leg deformity caused by polio.

A patient with arm paralysis caused by poliovirus infection.

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A patient with arm paralysis caused by poliovirus infection.

Two polio survivors in Nigeria (photo credit: Paul Chenoweth, 2007).

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Two polio survivors in Nigeria (photo credit: Paul Chenoweth, 2007)

A few examples from public health professionals and from the Immunization Action Coalition

Child in Nigeria with a leg partly paralyzed from polio

A child in Nigeria with a leg partly paralyzed from polio (Photo by Stacie Dunkle, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

A young girl with leg braces following poliomyelitis, Chad (Photo by Minal Patel, STOP volunteer).

A young girl in Chad with leg braces following poliomyelitis, (Photo by Minal Patel, STOP volunteer)

Boys with leg deformities following polio.

Boys with leg deformities following polio.

Courtesy of World Health Organization.

Courtesy of World Health Organization

The wild poliovirus usually paralyses children under 5 years old.

The wild poliovirus usually paralyzes children under 5 years old.

Related Resources

Page last reviewed: September 28, 2021
Content source: Global Immunization