Module 2A: Infrastructure to Accommodate Pedestrians and Bicyclists

Community/Municipality:                                                    

Please answer these questions based on the community / municipality selected.


Plans  and Policies

The Plans referred to in this module are those adopted by a local or regional authority. Plans can stand alone (e.g., Pedestrian Plan, Bicycle Plan) or be part of a Comprehensive Plan (e.g., Master Plan, General Plan). “Plan” is capitalized to indicate that it is a document adopted by a local or regional authority.

The Policies referred to in this module are those written and adopted by a local, regional, or state authority. Policies include local ordinances (such as zoning regulations, subdivision ordinances, street design guidelines) passed by local governing authorities, such as a city council or board of commissioners.


2A.1 Does your state have planning or policy guidance/requirements that affect local or regional products or processes related to pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure?

  • Yes → describe:                                                                                                                                                          
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

The next questions are about Vision Zero. Vision Zero is an initiative to reduce the number of fatalities and serious injuries involving road traffic on the highway system to zero.

2A.2 Does the community address reducing traffic related deaths and injuries using Vision Zero through a plan?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.3 Does the community address reducing traffic related deaths and injuries using Vision Zero through a policy, ordinance, or resolution?

  • Yes, there is a policy or ordinance
  • Yes, there is a resolution
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

The next questions are about Complete Streets. Complete Streets are streets that make it easy to cross the street, and drive a car, bicycle, or walk along the street. Streets designed to allow safe access for all users, including public transportation riders, bicyclists, pedestrians, transit users, and motorists.

2A.4 Does the community address Complete Streets through a plan? (It may be a Complete Streets Plan or included in another Plan, but specifically indicated as such.)

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.5 Does the community address Complete Streets through a policy, ordinance, or resolution?

  • Yes, and there is a policy or ordinance
  • Yes, and there is a resolution
  • No → skip to #2A.7
  • Not applicable → skip to #2A.7
  • Don’t know → skip to #2A.7

2A.6 Complete Streets

Complete Streets
Does the Complete Streets policy, ordinance, or resolution require or suggest: Require Suggest No Not applicable Don’t know
a. Prioritizing population(s) with the greatest need, with considerations for equity and inclusion?
b. Private development projects need to comply?
c. Interagency coordination between agencies such as public health, housing, planning, engineering, transportation, public works, city council, and the mayor or executive office?
d. The adoption of state-of-the-practice design guidance or the development/ revision of internal design policies or guides?
e. New or revised land use policies, plans, or zoning ordinances to specify how they will support and be supported by Complete Streets?
f. Performance measures?
g. Decision criteria to encourage prioritization for Complete Streets implementation?
h. Consideration of pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit riders when repaving roads?
i. Implementing agencies modify administrative guidance (e.g., employee performance, traffic operations, design manuals, timely project completion)
to accommodate Complete Streets implementation?
j. New construction and reconstruction projects account for the needs of all transportation modes and users of the road network?
k. Maintenance projects and ongoing operations, such as resurfacing, repaving, restriping, rehabilitation, or other types of changes to the
transportation system account for the needs of all transportation modes and users of the road network?

 

The next questions are about shared-use paths. Shared-use paths are paved (e.g., greenways) or unpaved (e.g., trails) accommodations for pedestrians and bicyclists for transportation or recreation.

Note: Sidewalks are not included as part of shared-use paths since they are considered pedestrian only infrastructure. Sidewalks are addressed in Module 2 Section B: Infrastructure to Accommodate Pedestrians.

2A.7 Does the community address linking or connecting existing and planned shared-use paths through a Plan?

  • Yes, and the Plan was adopted 0–<5 years ago
  • Yes, and the Plan was adopted 5–<10 years ago
  • Yes, and the Plan was adopted 10 or more years ago
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.8 Does the community address linking or connecting existing and planned shared-use paths through policies?

  • Yes, and the policy is routinely enforced
  • Yes, and the policy is not routinely enforced
  • No → Skip to #2A.10
    Not applicable → Skip to #2A.10
  • Don’t know → Skip to #2A.10

Policies

2A.9 Shared-use paths

Shared-use paths
Do the community’s policies require or suggest shared-use paths be built for: Require Suggest No Not applicable Don’t know
a. Residential development?
b. Commercial development?
c. Any redevelopment?

2A.10 Allowing vehicles at a traffic light to turn right on red puts pedestrians and bicyclists at more risk for injury. Does the community have a policy restricting “right turn on red” signals?

  • Yes, and the policy applies to all intersections
  • Yes, and the policy applies to some intersections
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.11 Does the community have a policy that allows variation in the width of the paved streets depending on the character of the area, projected volume of traffic, and/or desired speed of traffic?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.12 Does the community have a process to add traffic calming measures to streets?

  • Yes, and the process is routinely used and produces the desired results
  • Yes, and the process is routinely used, but does not produce the desired results
  • Yes, and the process is not routinely used, but does produce the desired results
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.13 Does the community have a policy regarding unleashed dogs?

  • Yes, and the policy is routinely enforced
  • Yes, but the policy is not routinely enforced
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.14 Street Trees

Street trees
Do the community’s zoning regulations or local ordinances require or suggest planting street trees for: Require Suggest No Not applicable Don’t know
a. Residential developments?
b. Commercial developments?
c. Any redevelopment?

2A.15 Does the community have a speed limit reduction policy?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.16 Does the community use the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTOexternal icon) best practices for design for people who walk, bicycle, or use transit?

  • Yes
  • No, but a different set of best practices are used
  • No → skip to #2A.18
  • Not applicable → skip to #2A.18
  • Don’t know → skip to #2A.18

2A.17 How often does the community follow best practices for design for people who walk, bicycle,  or use transit from the NACTO or another organization?

  • Always
  • Usually
  • Sometimes
  • Rarely
  • Never
  • Don’t know

Environment

The following questions are about the built environment infrastructure in the community.
This section focuses on shared-use paths, including paved and unpaved trails, available in the  community. Shared-use paths do not include sidewalks or side paths (e.g., wide sidewalks along roads).

2A.18 How many linear miles of shared-use paths are currently available in the community? This does not include sidewalks or side paths. If there are no shared-use paths, enter zero.

  •                       linear miles
  • Miles not tracked
  • Not applicable → skip to #2A.23
  • Don’t know

2A.19 Safety Amenities

Safety amenities
Does the community have the following safety amenities on most or all shared-use paths for pedestrians and bicyclists? Yes No Not applicable Don’t know
a. Lighting
b. Emergency call boxes

2A.20 Is there a map of the community’s shared-use paths available to the public? Include maps developed for the community; do not include web-based maps such as Google Maps.

  • Yes
  • No, but a map is in development
  • No, and there is no map in development
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.21 Does maintenance on shared-use paths occur in the community (e.g., keeping surfaces level and in good repair, clearing debris and snow, and cutting back vegetation) through

a.  A scheduled process?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

b.  Routine inspections?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

c.  At citizen’s request?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

d.  By property owners who are responsible for shared-use path maintenance?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

e.  Other?
Please describe:                                                                                                                                                                          

2A.22 Does the community routinely count users on shared-use paths?

  • Yes – manual counting
  • Yes – automated counting (e.g., infrared, video)
  • Yes – both manual and automated counting
  • No
  • Not applicable Don’t know

Resources

The following questions area about resources to support plans, policies, and built environments that impact walking and bicycling.

2A.23 Does the community ask developers to pay a fee to help with expenses for new parks, open spaces, paths elsewhere in the community as a substitute for requiring developers to include those spaces in new projects?

  • Yes
  • No → skip to #2A.25
  • Not applicable → skip to #2A.25
  • Don’t know → skip to #2A.25

2A.24 What is the fee structure or rate?

  • Fee structure:                                                                                                                                                           
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.25 Resources

Resources
Does the community have resources identified to: Yes No Not applicable Don’t know
a. Redevelop roads to accommodate walking and bicycling?
b. Spend on other types of pedestrian and bicycle projects?
c. Maintain and repair shared-used paths?
d. Acquire land for new connections and build new shared use paths?

2A.26 Does the community prioritize using federal transportation funding for pedestrian, bicycle or multi-modal facilities over vehicle only facilities?

  • Yes → describe:                                                                                                                                                           
  • No
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know

2A.27 What percent of the community’s local annual transportation funding was invested in pedestrian and bicycle projects in the last 12 months?

  •               %
  • Not applicable
  • Don’t know
Terms and Definitions

Complete Streets: Streets that make it easy to cross the street, drive a car, bicycle, or walk along the street. Streets designed to allow safe access for all users, including public transportation riders, bicyclists, pedestrians, transit users, and motorists.

Comprehensive plan: The adopted official statement of a governing body of a local government that sets forth (in words, maps, illustrations, and/or tables) goals, policies, and guidelines intended to direct the present and future physical, social, and economic development that occurs within its planning jurisdiction and that includes a unified physical design for the public and private development of land.

Local roads: Streets that provide local access. They may include non-arterial roads.

Performance measures: Quantitative and qualitative metrics used to evaluate transportation projects and/or the transportation system.

Shared-use paths: Paths that include paved (e.g., greenways) or unpaved (e.g., trails) accommodations for pedestrians and bicyclists useful for transportation or recreation.

Traffic calming: Design measures to improve safety for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users by slowing motor vehicle traffic (e.g., speed humps, landscaped islands in the middle of intersections).