Federated States of Micronesia: Providing Better Care for Diabetes Patients

One in three residents in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM) has diabetes. In 2013, three in four FSM states declared a state of emergency because of the rising rates of chronic diseases and the challenges in addressing them, such as limited resources and access to care. A Non-Communicable Disease (NCD) Step Survey confirmed that NCDs pose a significant threat to health to FSM residents. FSM used a major portion of its Preventive Health and Health Services (PHHS) Block Grant funds to increase its ability to track health services and provide coordinated care for people dealing with chronic diseases, particularly diabetes.

In 2014, FSM’s public health workforce trained in new ways to manage chronic diseases and reach more patients with timely care. FSM introduced a Chronic Care Model, patterned after CDC’s coordinated care approach. The model uses a multi-pronged plan for care that includes self-management, organization of healthcare and community linkages, and effective communication among patients, families, and healthcare teams. The FSM Department of Health and Social Affairs also began training public health workers to improve care for chronic disease patients in major hospitals and island clinics throughout FSM.

During the trainings, public health staff members learned how to work across health organizations and share information to improve patient care. They also learned how to use the chronic disease electronic management registry, which tracks the number and types of services provided.

In 2014, FSM tracked the care provided to more than 2,600 diabetes patients. These patients received more than 1,300 flu and pneumococcal vaccines, along with 110 foot examinations. Nearly 600 of the patients received an A1C blood test, which measures a person’s average blood sugar level over 8–12 weeks and helps providers treat patients more effectively and prevent potentially life-threatening complications.

As a result of PHHS Block Grant funding, 133 staff members are now trained and ready to implement the Chronic Care Model and provide essential care to diabetes patients in FSM.

Story year: 2015

Photo: The word diabetes with a heart and stethoscope.

FSM used a major portion of its PHHS Block Grant funds to increase its ability to track health services and provide coordinated care for people dealing with chronic diseases, particularly diabetes.

Check other previous PHHS Block Grant success stories from Federated States of Micronesia

Page last reviewed: April 17, 2018