PE Fellow and Alumni Biographies

Adrienna Bingham, PhD, MA

During her fellowship, Adrienna was assigned to the National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. She worked on projects such as a dynamic compartmental model of the US HIV epidemic, an agent-based model charactering sexual transmissions of HIV in the US, and an HIV disease progression mode. Adrienna earned her doctoral and master’s degrees in applied science from the College of William and Mary.

Jiajia Chen, PhD

During his fellowship, Jiajia was assigned to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health. His projects included postpartum care, adverse maternal and infant health conditions, and opioid misuse related to maternal and child outcomes. He earned his doctoral degree in economics from the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he constructed a two‐sector model of physician behavior and used predictions from this model to guide his empirical analysis.

Yu Chen, PhD, MS

During her fellowship, Yu was assigned to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Diabetes Translation. She used her statistical and econometric expertise while working on projects such as projecting future burden of diabetes and its complications; geographical variation in medical expenditures; and the use of health services and diabetes preventative care among older adults. She earned her doctoral degree in economics and her master’s degree in statistics from the University of Georgia.

Christopher Dunphy, PhD, MS

During his fellowship, Christopher was assigned to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, Health Systems and Trauma Systems Branch. He worked on projects such as opioid prescribing in the US, evaluating addiction severity, and state opioid support. He earned his doctoral degree in health economics and his master’s degree in agricultural and developmental economics from Ohio State University.

Samuel Eppink, PhD, MA

During his fellowship, Samuel was assigned to the National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of STD Prevention. He worked on projects such as conducting an economic analysis of an HSV screening and treatment program in the US; identifying optimal use of resources across STD programs; and researching the threat of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea. He earned his doctoral and master’s degree in economics from Vanderbilt University.

Kai Hong, PhD, MS

During his fellowship, Kai was assigned to the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Immunization Services Division. He focused on the effects of non-health policies on health outcomes and econometrics. He earned his doctoral degree in economics from Vanderbilt University, his master’s degree in economics from Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and his master’s degree in systems science from the Beijing Normal University.

Jingjing Li, PhD, MPH, MBBS

During her fellowship, Jingjing was assigned to the National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Research Application and Evaluation Branch. She worked on projects such as effectiveness of activities supported by DASH Cooperative Agreement 1308; recommendations for adolescent and school health program improvement; and effect of district or school level policies and practices on individual-level health outcomes. She earned her medical and master’s degrees from Wuhan University in China and her doctoral degree in behavioral sciences and health education from Emory University.

Ngoc Nguyen, PhD

During her fellowship, Ngoc was assigned to the National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. She worked on projects such as a dynamic compartmental model of the US HIV epidemic, an agent-based model charactering sexual transmissions of HIV in the US, and an HIV disease progression mode. She earned her doctoral degree in industrial and systems engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

Joohyun Park, PhD, MS

During her fellowship, Joohyun was assigned to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Diabetes Translation. She worked on projects such as applying the CDC/Research Triangle Institute Diabetes Cost-effectiveness model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the prevention and control of diabetes. She applied the microsimulation of nutrition, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of food/nutritional policies for preventing type 2 diabetes. She earned her doctoral and master’s degrees social and administrative sciences in pharmacy from the University of Wisconsin.

Carlo Davila Payan, PhD, MS

During his fellowship, Carlo was assigned to the Center for Global Health, Global Immunization Division. He worked on projects such as value of information analysis, disease impact modeling of country strategic investment plans, new vaccine introduction costing, and supplemental immunization activity efficiency analysis. He earned his doctoral degree in industrial and systems engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and his master’s degree in industrial engineering from Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico.

Lauren Steinbaum, PhD

During her fellowship, Lauren was assigned to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. She worked on modeling the health and economic impact of achieving the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program action plan, the Program Impact model, and studying the health and economic burden of cancer at the state level. She earned her doctoral degree in industrial engineering and operations research from Stanford University.

Zhiqiu Ye, PhD

During her fellowship, Zhiqiu was assigned to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, Applied Research and Evaluation Branch. She worked on projects such as literature review of economic burden of cardiovascular disease; economic burden of cardiovascular disease; and development of cost collection tools and analytic methods for program cost studies. She earned her doctoral degree in health services research and policy analysis from the University of Rochester.

Weiming Zhu, PhD, MS

During his fellowship, Weiming was assigned to the National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. He earned his medical and master’s degrees from Fudan University in China and his doctoral degree in epidemiology from the University of California at Los Angeles.

Maria Aslam, PhD, MA

Fellowship Assignment:  National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During her fellowship, Maria identified and analyzed public health issues across five areas: school health, HIV, STD, viral hepatitis, and TB.  She also evaluated the impact of National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Epidemiologic and Economic Modeling Agreement, Program Collaboration and Service Integration, and Core Indicators projects; determined the economic impact of school health policies and infectious diseases (HIV, STD, VH, and TB); and applied econometric tools (linear and non-linear modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, cross-section and panel data analysis, small area estimation, difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity design, and interrupted time series) to current work of the center. She earned her doctoral and master’s degrees in economics from Emory University.

Mandar Bodas, PhD, MHA

Fellowship Assignment: HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

During his fellowship, Mandar worked on projects related to opioids, childhood obesity, Medicare and Medicaid, and health systems. He is an Indian-trained physician. He earned his doctoral degree in health policy from the Virginia Commonwealth University.  His dissertation focused on ways to apply theoretical frameworks from health economics to evaluate various socioeconomic determinants of maternal and child health.  From this, he wrote an investigation of the contribution of neighborhood socioeconomic factors to early childhood obesity in the United States.

Srimoyee (Sri) Bose ,PhD, PhD, MA, MS

Fellowship Assignment: Utah Department of Health

During her fellowship, Sri worked on topics such as syringe exchange, home visitation, hypertension, neonatal health, opioids, Medicaid utilization, diabetes and asthma prevention, and family planning. She earned her doctoral degree in public health from Georgia State University, doctoral and master’s degrees in economics from the University of West Virginia, and her master’s degree in economics from Presidency College in India. Her public health dissertation focused on late stage breast cancer diagnosis and survival among younger women in the United States, pre and post Affordable Care Act.  Her economics dissertation looked at the effects of health care expenditure in the economic development of the United States from 2000-2009.

Kai Hong, PhD, MS, MS

Fellowship Assignment: Wagner School of Public Policy at New York University

During his fellowship, Kai focused on using econometrics to improve the health and well-being of population. He earned his doctoral degree in economics from Vanderbilt University, his master’s degree in economics from Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and his master’s degree in systems science from the Beijing Normal University.

Gloria Kang, PhD, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Zoonotic and Emerging Infectious Diseases

During her fellowship, Gloria studied various infectious diseases with the center. She earned her doctoral degree in biomedical and veterinary sciences and her master’s degree in public health, infectious diseases from the Virginia Polytechnic University. Her dissertation focused on social, behavioral, and economic factors affecting influenza and vaccination in the United States.

Lyudmlya (Lucy) Kompaniyets, PhD, MS, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Lucy studied the costs of childhood obesity and its related comorbidities on both the national level and the state-by-state level, estimated cost effectiveness of weight management programs children and adolescents, and estimated costs associated with obesity-related chronic diseases. She earned her doctoral degree in economics and master’s degree in statistics from Washington State University.  She wrote her dissertation on the relationship between body mass index and participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.  She earned her master’s degree in agricultural economics from University of Kentucky.

Lia Scott, PhD, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Lia worked on projects for the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and the Colorectal Cancer Control Program. She gained experience at CDC designing and implementing studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques, spatial analysis, and geographic information systems as part of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control. She earned her doctoral and master’s degrees in public health from Georgia State University.  For her dissertation, she studied micro- and macro-level factors that contribute to disparate rates of breast cancer diagnosis.

Raul Segura-Escano, PhD, MA

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services

During his fellowship, Raul worked with the Division of Scientific Education and Professional Development. He earned his doctoral degree in economics from the City University of New York, Graduate School & University Center, and his master’s degree in economics from Hunter College.  His dissertation focused on the economic and health effects of the Boston Marathon bombings. He also studied opioid use, housing shocks, food stamps, and behavioral health.

Rieza Soelaeman, PhD, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Environmental Health

During her fellowship, Rieza focused on the feasibility of state and local health departments to conduct testing for blood lead. She examined longitudinal trends of childhood blood lead testing rates, mean blood lead levels before and after passage of lead laws requiring blood lead testing, and the cost of testing and retesting to CDC criteria. She earned her doctoral degree from Tulane University in Global Health Management and Policy and her master’s degree in public health in epidemiology from the University of Michigan.  Her dissertation focused on the economics of skilled birth attendance in Indonesia.

Andrea Strahan, PhD, MPP

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

During her fellowship, Andrea examined variations among state policies to control opioids and medical care utilization by opioid abusers. She worked with states to enhance and maximize State Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs and implemented insurer-health system interventions aimed at preventing prescription drug overdose and abuse. She earned her doctoral degree in economics from Emory University and her master’s degree in public policy from the University of Chicago. Her dissertation focused on various policies affecting women and infant health.  She gained a wide range of experiences evaluating the impact of social programs.

Shichao Tang, PhD, MPA, MA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

During his fellowship, Shichao applied his strong econometric skills to help build and extend the center’s policy portfolio by identifying sexual violence and child maltreatment policies and data sources. He evaluated the impact of low income housing tax credits on violence and the cost effectiveness of primary prevention programs implemented by Rape Prevention and Education programs to prevent the perpetration of sexual violence. He earned his doctoral degree in economics from Indiana University/Purdue University at Indianapolis and his master’s degree in public administration from Indiana University at Bloomington. His dissertation applied various causal econometric models to understand the impact of substance abuse on employment.

Gina Turrini, PhD, MPP

Fellowship Assignment: HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

During her fellowship, Gina worked on projects related to opioids, childhood obesity, Medicare and Medicaid, and health systems. She earned her doctoral degree in applied microeconomics and her master’s degree in public policy from Duke University.  She gained experience utilizing the tools of applied microeconomics to study health, human capital, and public policy around the world.

Mahlet Woldetsadik, PhD, MPHIL, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health

During her fellowship, Mahlet evaluated the impact of CDC’s global health security investments. Specific projects included the evaluation of international outbreaks of infectious diseases, international public health capacity-building, and an economic evaluation of the Global Rapid Response Team. She earned her doctoral and master’s of philosophy degrees in public policy analysis from the RAND Pardee Graduate School.  She also earned her master’s degree in public health from Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sante Publique, Paris, France. She studied social policies domestically and internationally and gained experience in refugee health and health protection of displaced populations that is highly applicable to the work at CDC.

Aziza Arifkhanova, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignement: Denver Health Deparment

During her fellowship, Aziza expanded her scope of practice to include opioids. She earned a doctoral degree in public policy analysis at the Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School and a master’s degree in economics from Florida State University. Aziza wrote her dissertation on clinician scope of practice and how that has changed under the Affordable Care Act.

Biplab Datta, PhD, MA, MS

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health, CDC

During his fellowship, Biplab performed sound research that informed health policy decision-making. He earned a doctoral degree in economics from Georgia State University, a master’s degree in economics from Simon Fraser University, and a master’s degree in applied economics from the University of Dhaka. His dissertation focused on three topics: the financing link between K-12 education and pollution; how public infrastructure stimulates private sector productivity; and the trade-offs between untangled subsidies and targeted social safety net programs in developing countries.

Yanyun (Julia) He, PhD, MA, MBA

Fellowship Assignment: California Department of Public Health

During her fellowship, Yanyun studied the impact of California’s new tobacco tax on various aspects of tobacco use; impact of the minimum age increase on tobacco uptake; impact of retail sales fee increase on sales to minors; and the cost effectiveness of a tobacco media campaign. She earned a doctoral and master’s degree in economics and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Her dissertation was on the influence of parents and peers on adolescent smoking. Yanyun studied a range of policies and their influence on smoking behaviors and became familiar with a number of smoking-related data sets. Yanyun also co-authored a publication in the International Journal of Environmental Research in Public Health titled “The Association between Warning Label Requirements and Cigarette Smoking Prevalence by Education-Findings from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS).”

Seonghye Jeon, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

During her fellowship, Seonghye investigated costs and efficiencies, compared to standard testing methodologies, of laboratory testing methods using the new genetic “deep sequencing” technologies; modeling the impact of Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) Core Action Packages on disease morbidity and mortality; and estimating the burden of brucellosis and the impact of cattle vaccination in Kenya. She earned a doctoral degree in industrial and systems engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Xu Ji, PhD, MPH, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During her fellowship, Xu estimated the impact of state policies on comprehensive smoking ban on the rate and cost of adverse infant health outcomes such as preterm birth using a nationwide database; estimated cost of hypertension in pregnant women; and study the economic impact of state perinatal quality collaborative. She earned a doctoral degree in health services research and policy and a master’s degree in public health from Emory University.  Prior to that, she studied health administration and pharmacy science in China.  Xu performed three studies on mental health implications of discontinuous insurance coverage and state Medicaid eligibility policies.

Jaya Khushalani, PhD, MHA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During her fellowship, Jaya performed an economic evaluation of the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program modeling the future health burden and economic costs of cancer care and survivorship in the U.S., and economic evaluations of state breast and cervical cancer screening programs. She earned a doctoral degree in health services organization and research from Virginia Commonwealth University. Her dissertation was on decomposing racial and ethnic differences in receipt of immediate breast reconstruction surgery. During her time at VCU, Jaya developed analytic models for cancer screening and received a Susan G Komen fellowship to support her dissertation. She has 5 publications in peer-reviewed journals.

Zihao Li, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC

During his fellowship, Zihao focused on development and optimization of a range of models including the HIV Optimization and Prevention Economics (HOPE) Model; an agent-based model characterizing sexual transmissions of HIV in the US, DHAP’s HIV disease progression model; and a model to optimize scarce resources to prevent the most new cases of HIV. He earned doctoral and master’s degrees in operations research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.  His dissertation applied computer algorithms to the problem of allocating limited resources to people with preferences.

Nisha Nataraj, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC

During her fellowship, Nisha focused on prescription drug overdose. Specific projects included cluster modeling of opioid prescribing practices; identification of comorbidities most associated with opioid overdose; simulation modeling of the chronic pain population on prescription opioids; and work directly with States to advance and evaluate comprehensive state-level interventions that address opioid overuse, misuse, abuse, and overdose.  She earned a doctoral degree from North Carolina State University and a master’s of science degree from Rochester Institute of Technology, both in industrial and systems engineering. Her dissertation focused on modeling for the care of complex patients.

Qihua Qiu, PhD, MA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

During her fellowship, Qihua participated in the analyses of foodborne outbreaks and food recalls; evaluated the effects of socioeconomic status or regional economic conditions on foodborne illnesses; and applied economic models to estimate the cost and burden of foodborne outbreaks. She earned a doctoral degree in economics from Georgia State University. She developed a list of working papers out of her dissertation, which looked at the economics of health risky behaviors. One of the papers summarizes her work using Bayesian methods published in the Journal of Development Economics.

Hui Shao, PhD, MHA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During his fellowship, Hui applied CDC/Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Diabetes Cost-effectiveness Model (CDC/RTI DCEM) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the prevention and control of diabetes; applied the new CDC/RTI Gestational Diabetes Cost-effectiveness Model (CDC/RTI GDCEM) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of screening for and managing gestational diabetes; and determined the geographical variation in medical expenditures and the use of health services and diabetes preventive care among older adults. He earned a doctoral degree in public health from Tulane University and a master’s degree in healthcare administration from Shandong University. His dissertation focused on updating the risk engine for diabetes progression and mortality in the US. He worked with very large data sets, and published 19 writings.

Austin Williams, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC

During his fellowship, Austin identified the optimal uses of rapid syphilis testing; analyzed the impact of public funding for STD prevention; and performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of interventions for chlamydia prevention. He earned his doctoral degree in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His dissertation focused on the health costs of environmental exposures.

Keith Branham, DrPH, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

During his fellowship, he focused on issues related to Medicaid, CHIP, individual market, and uninsured populations. He earned a doctoral degree in health management and policy and a master’s degree in public health from the University of Kentucky. His dissertation focused on prescription opioid policy and heroin use in the United States and his master’s thesis focused on health status and access to care among the uninsured in Kentucky.

Nelly Josefina Mejia Gonzalez, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health, CDC

During her fellowship, Nelly investigated the burden of enteric fever in Asia, program costs for influenza vaccine introduction; cost effectiveness of maternal influenza vaccine integration into antenatal care settings; and the economic benefit of 2nd year of life vaccination in Ghana.  Her manuscript, “Neighborhood Food Environment, Diet, and Obesity Among LA County Adults,” recently won the Preventing Chronic Disease 2015 Annual Student Paper Contest. She earned a doctoral degree in policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica, CA.  For her dissertation, she developed three essays on obesity and dietary habits focusing on empirical analyses of the effects of cash transfers and food environment.

Sarah Elizabeth Lewis, PhD, MSPH

Fellowship Assignment: Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

Sarah earned a doctoral degree in health policy from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and a master’s degree in health services research from Emory University. Her dissertation focused on assessing quality of non-cancer chronic care and medication adherence for comorbidities among men with prostate cancer.

Boon Peng Ng, PhD, MS, MA

Fellowship Assignment: Division of Diabetes Translation

During his fellowship, Boon leveraged his knowledge of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) administrative data to assess health services usage, medical expenditures, and the health and economic impact of naturally occurring health policies and interventions, including public health policies, health insurance policies, and clinical-community partnerships on populations of interest. He earned doctoral and master’s degrees in health economics from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. He also earned a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and worked for Ford Motor Company as an engineer/technical instructor.

Chanhyun Park, PhD, MEd, MPharm, RPh

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During her fellowship, Chanhyun reviewed cost-effectiveness analyses of antihypertensive drugs; estimated economic burden of hypertension by comorbidity status; and identified patterns of antihypertensive drug utilization and expenditures. Her goal was to contribute reliable evidence that allows healthcare professionals to make better clinical decisions, government agencies to create better healthcare policy, and even industry to develop better medications and medical devices. She earned a doctoral degree in health outcomes research from the University of Texas at Austin and two master’s degrees in quantitative methods and clinical pharmacy.  Her dissertation focused on comorbidity measures to predict clinical and economic outcomes among elderly gynecologic cancer survivors. Chanhyun published 11 articles in peer-reviewed journals.

Fatma Romeh M. Ali, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During her fellowship, she assessed the impacts of policies on tobacco use and smoking cessation; assessed the impact of electronic cigarettes advertising on adults demand for electronic cigarettes and transitions to and from other nicotine products; and assessed the impact of tobacco control funding on smoking-related medical care utilization and associated healthcare expenditures. She earned a doctoral degree in economics from Georgia State University. Her dissertation examined the effect of parental education on reproductive decision making and child health in developing countries. She used both econometric analysis and causal inference techniques such as regression discontinuity and difference in differences to extract exogenous variations and establish causal impacts. The first essay of her dissertation was published in the Review of Economics of the Household.

Krishna Prasad Sharma, PhD, MA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During his fellowship, Krishna investigated the effectiveness and cost of various strategies in National Breast and Cervical Cancer Control Program and Colorectal Cancer Control Program. He earned doctoral and master’s degrees in health economics from Wayne State University. His dissertation focused on the effect of technological change on health care cost and expenditures. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Medicare-linked data, he investigated how medical expenditures on cancer care evolved over time (1991-2005) and estimated the effect of technological change on cost attributed to cancer care.

Wafa Tarazi, PhD, MHA

Fellowship Assignment: Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation

During her fellowship, Wafa worked on several projects, including hospital financial performance; the association between social risk factors and performance on Medicare quality measures (IMPACT Act-Study B); and affordability of prescription drugs. She earned a doctoral degree in health policy and research from Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and a master’s degree in health administration from Washington State University. Her dissertation focused on the impact of public health insurance coverage and cancer care. Her master’s thesis focused on the impact of health reforms on the financial viability of California hospitals. While at VCU, Wafa held a Susan G. Komen Graduate Fellowship in health disparities.

Georgianne Fay Tiu, DrPH, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During her fellowship, Georgianne performed analytic studies on healthy eating, school nutrition, school-based physical activity and physical education, and management of chronic conditions in school settings in the United States. She earned a doctoral degree in health management and policy from the University of Kentucky and a master’s degree in leadership, management and policy from the University of Cincinnati. Linking 2013 data from the National Association of County and City Health Officials with the Area Health Resource Files, her dissertation investigated if a local health department choices in the provision of cancer and cardiovascular disease screening activities is contingent on the supply and availability of primary care providers in the community.

ThuyQuynh N. Do, PhD, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

During her fellowship, ThuyQuynh investigated the economic impact of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) in the U.S.; assessed the healthcare resource use and costs associated with spina bifida and Fragile X syndrome; and examined the impacts on caregivers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. She earned a doctoral degree in socio-medical sciences from the University of Texas Medical Branch, a graduate certificate in geographic information science and technology from the University of Southern California, and a master’s degree in epidemiology from Virginia Commonwealth University. Her dissertation focused on mammography disparities among Asian Americans using the Andersen’s Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

Nidhi Khurana, PhD, MPhil

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention

During her fellowship, Nidhi investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions. She used mathematical models to study the impact of delivering Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in individuals at high risk of HIV in the United States. She also served as the inter-agency President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Expenditure Analysis advisor for Ghana. She advised PEPFAR Ghana on reporting requirements of PEPFAR expenditures and provided technical assistance to use that data for evidence-based budgeting. She earned doctoral and master’s degrees in engineering and applied sciences from Yale University. Her dissertation focused on investigating motion and stability of particles in flows using numerical methods.

Kwame A. Nyarko, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

During his fellowship, Kwame conducted cost-of-illness analyses using claims data on children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. He used claims data to model the effects of policies and interventions on use of healthcare services and costs for children with autism spectrum disorder. He also conducted cost-effectiveness analyses of food fortification, including the recent voluntary folic acid fortification of corn masa flour. He earned a doctoral degree from the University of Iowa in health services and policy, with a concentration in health economics. His dissertation focused on the implications of the folic acid fortification mandate on infant and child health.

Jamison Pike, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

During her fellowship, Jamison examined the economic burden of preventable outbreaks and working on projects for the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. As the CDC lead for the Joint Initiative on Vaccine Economics V, she evaluated the Healthy People 2020 objectives relating to vaccination and vaccination coverage. Specifically, she examined the financial, economic, and epidemiologic relationships between vaccine preventable infectious diseases and chronic disease, and quantifying reimbursement barriers to adult vaccination. She also worked on systematic reviews regarding the application of productivity costs to cost of illness and cost effectiveness. She was awarded the NCIRD Public Health Professional of the Future for her work. She earned doctoral and master’s degrees in economics from the University of Wyoming. Part of her dissertation used real options analysis to examine strategic implementation of appropriate emerging infectious diseases prevention and control policies. Her work was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science and cited in Time magazine.

Tao Ran, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

During her fellowship, Tao worked on projects such as the national disease burden of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; national cost related to cognitive development of children due to prenatal exposure to mercury; and the cost benefit study of installing carbon monoxide detectors in residential houses. Tao worked projects on water fluoridation, consumers’ willingness to pay for nutrition information, and school-based health centers. She earned a doctoral degree in environmental and natural resource economics and a master’s degree in applied statistics from Louisiana State University.

Kristi-Warren Scott, PhD, MBA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Environmental Health

During her fellowship, Kristi evaluated interventions to reduce rates of the ill working. This included on-call staffing plans, paid sick leave, and training on the importance of not working while ill. She assisted with the assessment of state and local implementation of food safety policies and practices associated with preventing restaurant staff working when ill; improving hand-washing practices; and minimizing bare hand contact with food. This assessment also reviewed requiring trained, certified kitchen managers to be present during all hours of operation. She earned a doctoral degree in consumer economics at the University of Georgia and a master’s degree from Benedictine University in Illinois. Her dissertation was titled “Overweight and Obesity: Do Subjective Measures of Food Access Matter?”

Samuel Shillcutt, Jr. PhD, MSc, MSc

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During his fellowship, Samuel focused on economic evaluations of tuberculosis (TB) interventions, developing projections of future cases of TB under a range of scenarios, and developing budget and regulatory impact analyses related to TB control. He worked internationally to understand and control infectious diseases and has written 15 peer-reviewed articles in various publications. He earned a doctoral degree in health systems from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, a master’s degree in human biology from Oxford University, and a master’s degree in economic evaluation in health care from City College of London. His dissertation focused on an economic evaluation of diarrhea alleviation in India.

Eduardo A. Undurraga, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

During his fellowship, Eduardo focused on understanding the effectiveness and costs of interventions to prevent and control infectious diseases, such as Ebola, rabies, and shigellosis. He earned a doctoral degree in social policy from the Heller School, Brandeis University, and received formal training in hydraulic engineering.

Hilary K. Whitham, PhD, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention

During her fellowship, Hilary assisted with ongoing work on a dynamic compartmental model of the U.S. HIV epidemic. She worked on other projects such as assisting with micro-costing of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); examining men who have sex with men (MSM) behaviors across the HIV continuum of care; and updating health utility estimates for the HIV-positive population to inform cost-effectiveness analyses. She earned doctoral and master’s degrees in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota. Her academic research focused on identifying optimal cervical cancer prevention strategies for HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa using both epidemiology methods and Markov cohort cost-effectiveness modeling.

Xilin Zhou, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Xilin played a lead role in several projects. One of her projects aimed to understand the growth in spending on anti-diabetic drugs in the past three decades. In another project, she estimated the excess cost attributable to diabetes among patients with cardiovascular diseases. She also led a team of five colleagues reviewing the literature on the cost-effectiveness of interventions to diabetes. Her other projects included applying, validating, improving and expanding the CDC-Research Triangle Institute Diabetes Cost-effectiveness Model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the prevention and control of diabetes. She earned a doctoral degree in economics from Georgia State University.

Caresse Campbell, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

During her fellowship, Caresse collaborated with international partners on topics such as the determination of national disease burdens and evaluating the cost-effectiveness of proposed anthrax and brucellosis interventions. She earned a doctoral degree in health services research at the University of Alabama and a master’s degree in global health from Emory University. Her doctoral research focused on addressing issues in health outcomes, disease management and health disparities.

Bradford Greening, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases

During his fellowship, Bradford contributed to a number of projects such as providing frequent updates to Ebola case projections; evaluating the cost-effectiveness of providing anti-malarial prophylaxis to contacts of Ebola cases; providing estimates of international and domestic Ebola treatment bed needs; and evaluating efficiency and effectiveness of contact tracing systems. These assignments allowed him to work not only domestically in the CDC Emergency Operations Center, but also internationally in both Sierra Leone and Senegal. Other non-Ebola project areas included capacity of public health laboratories; cost-effectiveness of vaccination strategies and drug administration campaigns; and mathematical modeling for emergency preparedness scenarios. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, he continued in a permanent position with the same center. He earned a doctoral degree in ecology and evolution from Rutgers University. His dissertation focused on the analysis of information capacity and learning potential in social animal groups using higher-order networks.

Mei-Chuan Hung, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Mei-Chuan ran projects to estimate the health benefits and lifetime treatment cost-savings of meeting the Healthy People 2020 objectives for reducing invasive colorectal cancer and late-stage breast cancer in the United States. She earned a doctoral degree in health services research and quantitative policy analysis from the National Taiwan University and a master’s degree in epidemiology from the National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. Her dissertation focused on epidemiology, quality of life, survival, and cost-effectiveness of patients under prolonged mechanical ventilation in Taiwan.

Lidia Kayembe, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health

During her fellowship, Lidia worked closely with the Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Dominican Republic country teams. She served as an expenditure analysis advisor for President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programs, which allowed her to work in country offices and participate in various international strategic meetings held across Africa. She deployed to Guinea for several months as part of the CDC’s Ebola Response as a data manager on the Epidemiology team. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, Lidia accepted a permanent position in CGH on the Global Immunization Division (GID). She earned a doctoral degree in health economics at the University of Ottawa and a master’s degree in economics from Concordia University. Her dissertation focused on millennium development goals.

Gabrielle Ferro Miller, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Gabrielle led multiple research projects, including analyses of school district level policies and individual eating behaviors; evaluations of physical activity programs; and prevalence and cost of chronic diseases. She also worked on analyses related to school start time, injury behaviors, and trends in adolescents’ beverage consumption patterns using the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. She developed a webpage and infographic on the dangers of energy drinks for adolescents, which can be found on CDC’s Healthy Schools web site. She served on the Health Economics Research Group steering committee, led workshops on CDC’s School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity, and participated in the Science Ambassadors and Disease Detectives programs. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, Gabrielle accepted a permanent position at CDC’s National Center for Injury Control and Prevention, Division of Analysis, Research, and Practice Integration. She earned doctoral and master’s degrees in food and resource economics from the University of Florida. Her dissertation examined the impact of U.S. social welfare programs (e.g., the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and the National School Lunch Program) on individuals’ behavior.

María E. Negrón, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

During her fellowship, María worked on projects related to the economic burden of norovirus, cost-effectiveness of norovirus vaccine, and the impact of pharmacy vaccine administration policy on herpes zoster vaccine coverage. She was deployed twice to Sierra Leone as part of the data management team to assist in the CDC Ebola Response. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she accepted a position in CDC’s National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology. She earned a doctoral degree in veterinary epidemiology from the University of Calgary and a master’s degree in comparative epidemiology from Purdue University. Her dissertation focused on the role of bacteria in inflammatory bowel disease.

Ketra Rice, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Ketra conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of a patient navigation intervention to increase colonoscopy screening and an agent-based model of consumer decision making for colonoscopy screening. She worked on integrating disease burden in resource allocation models for the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) and helped design a study to assess the impact of changes in health care coverage on women screened for breast and cervical cancer screening through the NBCCEDP. She delivered economic evaluation workshops to the Health Resources Services Administration and provided technical assistance on economic evaluation to the state of Alabama Department of Public Health. She also co-authored a paper on integrating measures of equity in public health funding strategies and co-authored a second paper assessing the primary care provider network of the NBCCEDP. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, Ketra accepted a position in CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. She earned a doctoral degree in public policy and management and a master’s degree in agricultural economics from Ohio State University. Her dissertation examined the role of spatial factors in policy analysis and health disparities research.

Bisma Ali Sayed, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases

During her fellowship, Bisma evaluated the costs and benefits of expanding mandatory tuberculosis (TB) screening requirements to nonimmigrant long-term visa holders arriving in the United States from moderate to high incidence TB countries. She was actively involved in CDC’s Ebola Response; worked in the Emergency Operations Center; deployed to Sierra Leone; and conducted research to estimate the economic costs of implementing Ebola exit screening in West Africa. She also worked at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Innovation Center leading evaluations for new health care payment and service delivery models. She earned a doctoral degree in medical sociology with a specialization in statistics from the University of Miami.

Donglan Zhang, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Centers for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Donglan led several research projects updating the economic burden of hypertension and hyperlipidemia in the Unites States. She presented her research findings in scientific conferences such as the Academy Health annual meeting and the American Heart Association scientific sessions. She also synthesized economic evidence to support several national initiatives in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention including the Million Hearts and the Sodium Reduction Initiative. In addition, Donglan provided technical assistance for evaluation of the WISEWOMEN program and actively participated in research projects related to global CVD prevention and the Paul Coverdell National Stroke Registry. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she joined the University of Georgia as a tenure-track assistant professor in health policy and management. She earned a doctoral degree in health policy and management from the University of California–Los Angeles and a master’s degree in health economics from Fudan University. Her dissertation focused on an agent-based model to examine how upstream policies can change unhealthy dietary behaviors in an urban adult population.

Yuanhui Zhang, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Yuanhui led the project on estimating the health and economic benefits of implementing indoor tanning restrictions on melanoma prevention in the United States. She also worked on analyses related to the current breast cancer screening rate and the associated costs for commercially insured women. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, Yuanhui joined RTI International as a research scientist. She earned doctoral degree and master’s degrees in operations research from North Carolina State University. Her dissertation focused on robust optimal control, of treatment decisions for patients with type-2 diabetes.

Stephanie Chan, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During her fellowship, Stephanie conducted a literature review on costs, burden, and cost effectiveness of tuberculosis (TB) prevention, developed a cost calculator for the medical and programmatic costs of TB, and reviewed the policy implications to prevent or control tuberculosis. She also served as a subject matter expert for the PE Fellowship. She earned a doctoral degree in economics and policy analysis from the RAND Pardee Graduate School. Her dissertation focused on the effectiveness of U.S. environmental and social policies to reduce and prevent obesity.

Weiwei Chen, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

During her fellowship, Weiwei led projects in examining childhood vaccine price trends and collaborated with local partners on a project assessing the benefit of partial series vaccine administration in a mobile clinic setting. Her activities included other economic research related to young adults aging out of dependent coverage under the Affordable Care Act, human papillomavirus (HPV) coverage based on insurance claims database, and childhood immunization coverage based on a Socioeconomic Status Module of the National Immunization Survey. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she continued her research in health economics and public health at Florida International University. She earned a doctoral degree in economics from the University of Memphis. Her dissertation focused on health economics and applied microeconomics, with research topics such as health expenditure elasticity and the effects of insurance coverage on utilization.

Yao-Hsuan Chen, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases and National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During her fellowship, Yao-Hsuan investigated inverse optimization methodology applied in healthcare, conducted data mining in longitudinal risk transmission network data, developed a dynamic network growth model, conducted a modeling literature review summarizing school closure effectiveness in an influenza pandemic, redesigned the burial team’s route planning in West Africa, and identified international flights with a high risk of importing Ebola patients into the United States. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she continued on with NCHHSTP to further develop and refine various HIV models used in identifying optimal investment strategies for the prevention of new HIV infections. She earned a doctoral degree in industrial engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Muhammad Jami Husain, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During his fellowship, Muhammad provided research and consultation in applied public health economics. His projects focused on tobacco use, hunger, and economy-wide impact of tobacco use elimination in Bangladesh, Global Adult Tobacco Survey results in Thailand and Turkey, ‘Data to Action’ curriculum module on policy briefs, and the World Health Organization tax model for the 2015 Global Tobacco Report. He led and coordinated research for the Bill and Melinda Gates funded WHO-CDC-CDC Foundation project (2014-2018) in 23 African countries and provided supervision and input in building data analysis and research writing capacity in the region. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, Muhammad continued on with NCCDPHP, OSH as a senior service fellow. He earned a doctoral degree in economics from the University of Keele. His dissertation focused on population health and life expectancy implications on economic wellbeing from macro- and micro-level data. He authored several publications focusing on economic analysis of health outcomes.

Ji Lin, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During his fellowship, Ji worked on several projects, including projection of diabetes burden in the US adult population through 2060, cost-effective analysis of intensive glycemic control for older adults with diabetes, and cost-effectiveness of the new cholesterol guidelines on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, he continued with a permanent position with NCCDPHP. He earned a doctoral degree in biomedical engineering from Purdue University.

Tweodaj Mengistu, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health

During her fellowship, Tweodaj conducted cost and cost-effectiveness analyses, primarily in the area of maternal and child health and Prevention of Maternal-to-Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS. She played an active role in providing technical assistance on economic and financial issues to U.S. government teams administering the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in developing countries. She gained experience in economic policy research at both multinational and national research organizations. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she joined CGH as an economist. She earned a doctoral degree in policy analysis from Pardee RAND Graduate School. Her dissertation focused on the emerging infrastructure financing mechanisms in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Marco Mesa-Frias, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Office of the Associate Director for Policy

During his fellowship, Marco participated in research and analysis work to assess the economic impact of proposed health policies, programs, and budgets. He also provided technical consultation on economic methods, data, and evidence on the health and economic consequences of alternative policies, programs, and legislative proposals affecting public health and prevention. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, he continued on with OADP as a senior service Fellow. He earned his doctoral degree in public health and policy from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. His dissertation focused on modeling complex interventions in environmental health impact assessments. He was the primary author for the article “Uncertainty in environmental health impact assessment: Quantitative methods and perspectives” in the International Journal of Environmental Health Research.

Joseph D. Njau, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health

During his fellowship, Joseph provided economic assessment of measles and rubella outbreak costs in Romania and trained field epidemiology students in Indonesia to conduct analysis of economic burden of sporadic measles and outbreak response costs. He assisted in developing a cost assessment tool to help World Health Organization (WHO) member countries switch from trivalent oral polio to bivalent oral polio. CGH awarded Joseph a competitive grant to conduct an economic evaluation of mobile phone short messages to improve measles immunization coverage during supplementary immunization activities in Zimbabwe. Joseph participated in collaborative projects with outside institutions including Sabin Vaccine Institute. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, he continued on with CGH as a senior service fellow. He earned his doctoral degree in economics and health policy from Emory University. His dissertation focused on the economic and social implications of large scale implementation of malaria control interventions.

Sarah Pallas, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health

During her fellowship, Sarah served as the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) expenditure analysis advisor for Haiti and the Dominican Republic, conducted a cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of GeneXpert tuberculosis diagnosis for people living with HIV/AIDS in Cambodia, and designed a cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of using HIV viral load for initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Swaziland. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she continued working with CGH as a health economist. She earned her doctoral degree in health policy and management from Yale University. Her dissertation, “Effects of Donor Proliferation in Health Sector Aid on Health Program Performance in Low-and Middle-Income Countries,” used econometric methods to test whether increases in the number of development aid donors impacted population health outcomes from 1995-2010 in 155 countries, with in-depth case studies in Vietnam and Ghana.

Kristina Rabarison, DrPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Kristina conducted economic studies for the Prevention Research Centers, Workplace Health Promotion, and Health Aging programs. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she continued to work in NCCDPHP as a senior service Fellow. She earned her doctoral degree in health services management from the University of Kentucky. Her dissertation focused on the analysis of expenditure causes and consequences of Title V block grant investments on select maternal and child health outcomes. Her research experience includes projects funded by the Office of The Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in the Department of Health and Human Services, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Xu Wang, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Xu calibrated the impact of price increases on tobacco use and smoking cessation, the use of price-related promotions, tax avoidance and evasion behaviors, and evaluated the effectiveness of various tobacco control policies, regulations, and interventions. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she continued her research at NCCDPHP as a health economist. She earned her doctoral degree in economics from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). Her dissertation evaluated a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) on birth outcomes and breastfeeding behaviors, with a special focus on identifying plausibly causal program effects and deriving implications for policy.

Jing Xu, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

During her fellowship, Jing developed a decision-analytic model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of seasonal inactivated influenza vaccination among pregnant women. This study reflected a significant addition to prevention effectiveness literature, as the influenza landscape in the United States greatly changed after 2009. She estimated vaccine needs of uninsured adults following Medicaid expansions under CDC. She also performed other economic research related to immunization services utilization among privately insured population using medical claim data. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, she joined the Office of Public Health Strategy and Analysis at the Food and Drug Administration. She earned her doctoral degree in economics from Emory University.

Kun Zhang, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Office of the Associate Director for Policy

During his fellowship, Kun analyzed the medical costs of obesity to large, self-insured employers in the United States. Later, he transferred to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control where he identified, developed, and evaluated public health strategies and interventions at health system or state-level and deemed promising by the CDC. Examples included enhanced Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, third-party payer strategies, and policy/legislative initiatives. He also oversaw multiple research projects funded by or through the CDC. After graduating from the PE Fellowship, he continued his work with NCIPC as a senior service fellow. He earned his doctoral degree in health services research from Emory University. His dissertation focused on the financial and health implications of Medicare home health care reimbursement policy change using the annual Medicare Current Beneficiaries Survey.

Madeleine Baker-Goering, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Office of the Associate Director for Policy

During her fellowship, Madeleine focused on economic and policy research around hypertension management and control, which was largely performed using MarketScan datasets. She contributed to a multi-year CDC contract with Health Partners Institute for Education and Research that used microsimulation models to assess the health, economic, and budget impacts of interventions and policies to prevent cardiovascular disease. She earned her doctoral degree in economics from Duke University. Her dissertation focused on experimental approaches to analyzing the role of information in behavioral and environmental economics.

HeeKyoung Chun, ScD, MA

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health

During her fellowship, HeeKyoung performed a comprehensive economic and policy analysis of the Field Epidemiology Training Programs. In addition, she developed models to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment strategies for reducing mother–to–child transmission of HIV and Hepatitis B virus. Prior to her fellowship, she served as an Association for Prevention Teaching and Research fellow at CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. She earned her doctoral degree in work environment policy with minors in epidemiology and economics from the University of Massachusetts. She earned her master’s degree in economics from Boston University. Her dissertation examined the relationship between job insecurity and workers compensation filings.

Edward Coffield, PhD, MA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During his fellowship, Edward led or co-led research teams that: found an association between Shape Up Somerville—a child-focused community-wide obesity intervention—and reductions in parent body mass indexes; estimated the cost-savings associated with Shape Up Somerville; and, produced the first edition of CDC’s Physical Education Profiles. He also participated in a meta-analysis project which examined the relationship between school recess and student behaviors as well as an investigation into whether enjoyment of physical activity mediates physical activity participation. In addition to his research, Edward provided subject matter expertise to the School Health Branch’s external partners on conducting economic analyses of their programs and primed the School Health Branch to continue its economic-based research. Following his fellowship, Edward began working in a faculty position at Hofstra University in New York. He earned a doctoral degree in economics from the University of Utah and a master’s degree in economics from the University of New Hampshire.

Kara Contreary, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services

During her fellowship, Kara worked on a review of a forecast of the public health and economic impact of expanding Medicaid coverage of smoking cessation therapy; an evaluation of the U.S. infant rotavirus vaccine program; and a project identifying “outlier counties” which have better health than expected given the population’s socioeconomic status. She also performed economic reviews for the Guide to Community Preventive Services. She earned her doctoral degree in economics and her master’s degree in research economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her dissertation featured three examples of applied theoretical economics about incentives within organizations.

Lin Fan, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During his fellowship, Lin’s projects included a review of the literature describing the history of, and current indications for, screening pregnant women for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). He also performed a cost analysis of routine testing for hepatitis B viral load among HBsAg-positive pregnant women. He conducted a cost effectiveness evaluation of screening for hepatitis B viral load among pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B infection. In addition, Lin analyzed the antiviral treatment during pregnancy for women with hepatitis B using MarketScan data. He was also involved in the economic evaluation of a multistate hepatitis A outbreak. He earned a doctoral degree in health services research and policy from the University of Rochester. His dissertation examined rural-urban disparities in the use of preventive care.

Evin Uzun Jacobson, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response

During her fellowship, Evin worked on two primary projects: the development of a preparedness index and an assessment of the costs of preparedness in the United States. She earned a doctoral degree from the University of North Carolina and a master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin, both in industrial engineering. Her dissertation focused on resource allocation models in the aftermath of mass casualty events.

Hee Soo Joo, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Hee studied indirect costs of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and economic evaluations of CVD prevention or intervention programs. Her manuscript, “A literature review of indirect costs associated with stroke,” was published in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease. She earned a doctoral degree in economics from the State University of New York (SUNY), Albany. Her dissertation examined income and education related disparities in cardiovascular outcomes and diabetes.

Andrew J. Leidner, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During his fellowship, Andrew worked on projects related to hepatitis C disease progression and the economic evaluation of early diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. He earned a doctoral degree in agricultural economics from Texas A&M University. His dissertation involved three economic essays on water resource management in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

Brian Maskery, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

During his fellowship, Brian’s projects revolved around economic evaluations of tuberculosis screening protocols for U.S.-bound immigrants and presumptive treatment of U.S.-bound refugees against intestinal parasites, schistosomiasis, and malaria. He also assisted other center researchers on economic analyses of hepatitis B, C, and HIV screening programs for refugees. He earned a doctoral degree in environmental engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His dissertation examined various models to incorporate private demand and herd protection into vaccine policy models

Yu Teng, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

During his fellowship, Yu 1) refined the Progression and Transmission of HIV/AIDS model to understand and predict HIV transmission within U.S. communities, with a focus on examining the cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve retention in HIV care; and 2) derived annual HIV diagnostic probability from HIV surveillance data. He earned a doctoral degree in biomedical engineering from the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering at Purdue University. His dissertation focused on optimal screening strategy design for chlamydia infection in young women.

La’Marcus T. Wingate, PharmD, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

During his fellowship, La’Marcus evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different strategies to screen for tuberculosis in populations migrating to the United States. He presented his preliminary findings at the Eastern Economics Association Conference. Upon completion of the fellowship, La’Marcus began an appointment as an assistant professor within the Department of Pharmacy Administration at the Howard University College of Pharmacy. He earned a doctoral degree in pharmacy and a doctoral degree in health outcomes and policy research from the University of Tennessee, Health Science Center. He was awarded one of six dissertation fellowships from the Boston College Center for Retirement Research for his dissertation which used conjoint analysis to evaluate senior citizens’ preferences for Medicare Part D prescription drug plans.

Ninee S. Yang, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

During her fellowship, Ninee performed research on the costs of teen pregnancy and teen pregnancy prevention, the impact of change in Medicaid reimbursement policy on long-acting reversible contraception, and the costs of preterm birth in the United States. She earned a doctoral degree in economics from Wayne State University and a master’s degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin. Her dissertation focused on the effect of changes in benefit drug design among individuals with diabetes in large employer-sponsored insurance plans.

Emine Yaylali, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STV, and TB Prevention

During her fellowship, Emine applied operations research and decision analytic methods to determine the most efficient allocation of HIV prevention resources and the cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions and programs among risk populations. She earned doctoral and master’s degrees in operations research from North Carolina State University. Her dissertation focused on models for alerting decisions in public health.

Chun Hai (Isaac) Fung, PhD, MSc

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

During his fellowship, Isaac conducted studies related to the development of an economic model to determine the cost-effectiveness of an influenza vaccine in Bangladesh, providing economic evaluation support to the International Emerging Infections Programs, and supporting the division’s preparedness activities, responding to modeling and evaluation requests as needed. Following the PE Fellowship, Isaac accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, Georgia Southern University, teaching infectious disease epidemiology and other epidemiology courses to masters of public health students.  He earned a doctoral degree in infectious disease epidemiology from the Imperial College of London and a master’s degree in the control of infectious diseases from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. His dissertation modeled the impact of an HIV intervention program among female sex workers in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Gery P. Guy, PhD, MPH

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC

During his fellowship, Gery focused on breast cancer screening among low-income or uninsured women, colorectal cancer test use in the United States, and estimating medical costs associated with cancer in the Medicaid population. Following the PE Fellowship, Gery accepted senior service Fellow position as a health economist in the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. He earned a doctoral degree in health services research and health policy and a master’s degree in public health from Emory University. His dissertation examined the effect of health insurance expansions on insurance status, access to case, and labor market participation. He published an article, “The Effects of Cost Sharing on Access to Care among Childless Adults” in the Health Services Research journal.

Ya-Lin (Aileen) Huang, PhD, MS

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC

During her fellowship, Aileen worked on projects related to determining the costs and cost-effectiveness of HIV behavioral interventions as delivered in the field, identification of the costs and cost-effectiveness of new HIV screening technologies and strategies to diagnose HIV early in the course of infection and prevent transmission, and assessment of the costs and benefits of HIV infrastructure, including the HIV surveillance system. She earned a doctoral degree in health services research and health policy from Emory University. Her dissertation focused on the practice patterns and outcomes associated with vaginal births after caesarian section.

Lisa O’Brien, PhD, MSc

Fellowship Assignment: Center for Global Health, CDC

During her fellowship, Lisa determined the macroeconomic effects of HIV treatment programs in developing country settings, identified the optimal delivery of HIV counseling and testing services in outpatient clinics, and understood the external benefits of HIV programs in reducing “orphan-hood” in Ethiopia. She earned a doctoral degree in medical sciences and a master’s degree in pharmaceutical sciences from the University of Toronto. Her dissertation was a risk-benefit assessment of the use of antidepressants during pregnancy from an economic, safety, and pharmacokinetic perspective.

Samuel K. Peasah, PhD, MBA

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC

During his fellowship, Samuel developed CDC’s official seasonal influenza estimates, direct and indirect costs associated with influenza infections and cost-effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination among those recommended to receive annual vaccination, and costs of influenza-associated outcomes in developing countries. Following the PE Fellowship, Samuel accepted a position as Research Assistant Professor within the pharmacy practice in the School of Pharmacy at Mercer University (Atlanta Campus) conducting health outcomes research and teaching health policy related courses. He earned a doctoral degree in health services research and a master’s degree of business administration from the University of Florida. His dissertation studied the impact of Medicare’s nosocomial infections policy on patient outcomes and hospitals’ financial performance.

Cora K. Peterson, PhD, MSc

Fellowship Assignment: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC

During her fellowship, Cora made economic and comparative analyses of data on healthcare use and expenditures associated with birth defects using national and state-level datasets. She performed longitudinal cost analysis of Medicaid health service use for children with selected birth defects; cost-effectiveness analysis of newborn screening for the early identification of children with critical congenital heart defects; and pre-gestational diabetes screening for the prevention of birth defects. Following the PE Fellowship, she accepted a Senior Service Fellow position as a health economist in the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Analysis, Research and Practice Integration.  She earned doctoral and master’s degrees in social policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her dissertation assessed the National School Lunch Program’s long-term health impact as well as the role of commodity foods in American schools.

Charles Stoecker, PhD

Fellowship Assignment: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC

During his fellowship, Charles focused on an estimation of the incremental costs and benefits associated with changes in immunization policy, program, and practice in the United States and estimating the cost-effectiveness of using innovative vaccines and vaccine schedules. Following the PE Fellowship, he accepted an assistant professor position specializing in health economics at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in the Department of Global Health Systems and Development where he teaches health economics and econometric methods to master’s degree and doctoral students. He earned a doctoral degree in economics from the University of California, Davis. His dissertation examined the long-term impacts of early life events such as exposure to extreme temperature.