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"We Were There" - Diacetyl and Popcorn Lung Disease

 

Not Everything Is Better with Butter-flavoring: Popcorn Lung Disease and the Dangers of Diacetyl

Header image for the latest installment of

On Wednesday, January 30th the “We Were There” lecture series presented “Not Everything Is Better with Butter-flavoring: Popcorn Lung Disease and the Dangers of Diacetyl,” at the Roybal Campus, Alexander D. Langmuir Auditorium.

Welcome to “We Were There,” a quarterly lecture series featuring past and present CDC researchers as they share their personal perspectives on historically important, epidemiologic and laboratory investigations. Each presentation provides insight into the rich past of CDC and gives the audience a chance to hear first-hand accounts from the responders.

In 2000, a physician reported that eight former microwave-popcorn factory workers had developed a rare and disabling lung disease, bronchiolitis obliterans. Four of the eight workers were ill and put on lung transplant waiting lists. After investigating numerous possible sources, researchers ultimately determined the cause of lung damage: a vapor from butter flavoring added to the popcorn.

Attendees heard a fascinating story of how disease detectives unraveled the mystery of popcorn-lung disease, and how we can protect workers from permanent lung damage caused by diacetyl in butter flavoring. Speakers included Kay Kreiss, MD, Ann F. Hubbs DVM, PhD, and Kristin J. Cummings, MD, MPH.

Resources

  • SPEAKER BIOS – Biographies for the 3 speakers featured during the second “We Were There” lecture, “Not Everything Is Better with Butter-flavoring: Popcorn Lung Disease and the Dangers of Diacetyl”

 

  • EVENT POSTER – Poster featuring the 3 speakers: Kay Kreiss, MD, Ann F. Hubbs DVM, PhD, and Kristin J. Cummings, MD, MPH.

 

  • Page last reviewed: February 5, 2019
  • Page last updated: February 5, 2019
  • Content source:
    • Office of the Associate Director for Science
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