Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) Photos

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses and a member of the family Picornaviridae.

Click on image to enlarge.

Surface view of EV-D68 looking down an icosahedrtal 2-fold axis.

Image source: Yue Liu and Michael G. Rossmann, Purdue University
The publication of this study was by Yue Liu, Ju Sheng, Andrei Fokine, Geng Meng, Woong-Hee Shin, Feng Long, Richard J. Kuhn, Daisuke Kihara, Michael G. Rossmann (all at Purdue University)

Surface view of EV-D68 looking down an icosahedrtal 2-fold axis. Note the 5 fold axes to the North and South of the central 2-fold axis and the 3-fold axes to the East and West of the central 2-fold axis. The colors correspond to the distance of the surface from the center of the virus. Red regions are about 155 Å (15nm), and the blue color corresponds to about 130A (13nm) from the center. The colors (red, yellow, green, blue) follow the order of colors in a rainbow. Thus the “highest” (mountainous) region are reddish, whereas the lowest regions are blue (water). A few electron microscopy images of the EV-D68 virus are shown in the black and white background. The possible drug binding site is under the surface shown here.

Click on image to enlarge.

This thin section transmission electron micrograph (TEM) reveals numerous, spheroid-shaped Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions, which are members of the family Picornaviridae.

Image source: Cynthia S. Goldsmith and Yiting Zhang, CDC

This photo shows an electron micrograph of a thin section of EV-D68, showing the numerous, spherical viral particles.

Click on image to enlarge.

This thin section transmission electron micrograph (TEM) reveals numerous, spheroid-shaped Enterovirus-D68 (EV-D68) virions, which are members of the family Picornaviridae. Note that some of the viral particles appear as if they are “empty”, missing their contents of single-stranded RNA (ssRNA).

Image source: Cynthia S. Goldsmith and Yiting Zhang, CDC

This photo shows an electron micrograph of a thin section of numerous, spherical EV-D68 viral particles. Note that some of the viral particles appear as if they are “empty,” missing their contents of single-stranded RNA.

 Top of Page

TOP