NMI Newsroom

CDC Publishes Updated Message Mapping Guides, Opens General Onboarding for STD and Congenital Syphilis
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC posted updated versions of the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) HL7 STD (v1.0.2, v1.1.0) and congenital syphilis (CS) (v1.0.1, v1.1.0) message mapping guides (MMGs) to the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center.  CDC also is opening up general onboarding to all jurisdictions for STD and CS.

Please note that STD v1.1.0 and CS v1.1.0 are the preferred versions to start; however, CDC will continue to support STD v1.0.2 or CS v1.0.1 for onboarding. For jurisdictions currently implementing previous MMG versions (STD v1.0, STD v1.0.1, or CS v1.0), they should adopt STD v1.0.2 or CS v1.0.1 to have the most updated value sets and assess their systems for when they can move to STD v1.1.0 or CS v1.1.0.

MMG Updates
The updated MMG versions include the following:

  • Updated data elements STD v1.1.0 and CS v1.1.0
    • added 14 data elements for STD v1.1.0 mostly focused on medications and complications
    • added 7 data elements for CS v1.1.0 focused on the lab interpretative section and linking to maternal cases
    • changed the name of 2 data elements for STD v1.1.0
    • changed the name of 2 data elements for CS v1.1.0
  • Updated value sets STD (v1.0.2, v1.1.0) and CS (v1.0.1, v1.1.0)

Onboarding Information
Onboarding for the STD and CS MMGs is now open to all jurisdictions. The NNDSS team and the CDC STD and CS programs will work with jurisdictions to validate their HL7 messages by using these new MMGs. Jurisdictions who have completed work by using older versions of the MMGs should review the current versions and consider implementing them before onboarding. The NNDSS team understands that states have other emergency response needs that may take precedence at this time and is opening the onboarding process for these MMGs for jurisdictions who are interested.

Other NNDSS HL7 MMGs open for general onboarding are the following:

  • arboviral v1.3
  • congenital syphilis v1.x
  • coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
  • generic v2
  • hepatitis
  • STD v1.x.

The following additional resources are available on the NNDSS Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center to help jurisdictions implement message mapping guides:

CDC is receiving, processing, and provisioning data in the new HL7 format through the Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System as the result of collaboration by teams across CDC and our partners at the Association of Public Health Laboratories, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and several jurisdictions who piloted these guides. These pilot jurisdictions have been invaluable to the NNDSS effort by providing their time and expertise during the piloting process.

About NNDSS
CDC conducts case surveillance through NNDSS. In the case surveillance process, about 3,000 health departments gather and use data on disease cases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

As technology, data, and exchange standards evolve, CDC is strengthening and modernizing the infrastructure that supports NNDSS. As part of the Data Modernization Initiative, CDC is enhancing the ability of NNDSS to provide comprehensive, timely, and high-quality data for public health decision-making. Through this multi-year initiative, CDC is making the NNDSS technological infrastructure more robust so that it is based on interoperable, standardized data and exchange mechanisms.

For questions about the updated guides or to begin onboarding, please reach out to the CDC Electronic Data Exchange mailbox at edx@cdc.gov. For more information about NNDSS, please access the NNDSS website at https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/.

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NNDSS Publishes Finalized Annual Infectious Disease Data
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC is pleased to announce that finalized 2018 National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) annual infectious disease data are now available as tables on the data and statistics section of the NNDSS webpage. In addition to links to the tables, hosted by the CDC Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiological Research (WONDER), the website provides detailed information about notifiable disease surveillance and the data themselves.

Annual infectious disease data are helpful to public health officials, policy makers, and researchers because they show the occurrence and population distribution of conditions of public health concern across the country. Year-to-year comparisons provide insights into historic trends and emerging patterns.

Highlights of the tables include the following:

  • Table 1 displays annual reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and incidence rates for the United States overall, excluding U.S. Territories.
  • Tables 2a–2q display annual reported infectious notifiable disease cases for the United States overall, by state, by region, and for five U.S. Territories (American Samoa, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands).
  • Table 3 displays reported infectious notifiable disease cases by month for the United States overall, excluding U.S. Territories.
  • Tables 4–7 display reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and rates by age group, sex, race, and ethnicity, respectively, for the United States overall, excluding U.S. Territories.

The list of nationally notifiable diseases for 2018 is available on the NNDSS website along with the respective national surveillance case definitions. Surveillance case definitions are a set of uniform criteria to define a disease or condition for public health surveillance. They enable public health to classify and count cases consistently across reporting jurisdictions.

Note 6 at the bottom of the 2018 NNDSS tables describes the population used in the incidence rate calculations, how the incidence rates were computed, and any age restrictions used in calculation of the rates.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika virus disease and Zika virus infection, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and E. coli. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather data on these diseases from sources such as healthcare providers, hospitals, and laboratories and use the data to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

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NNDSS Announces New Message Mapping Guide for Tuberculosis and Latent TB Infection HL7 Case Notifications
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), in collaboration with the CDC Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, is pleased to announce a finalized HL7 message mapping guide (MMG) is now available for tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection. Public health jurisdictions can prepare to send their disease notifications by using this MMG, which is posted on the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center.

CDC developed this MMG to support public health’s response needs as part of the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI). The NMI Technical Assistance and Onboarding teams are ready to assist jurisdictions in implementing the new messages and in obtaining approval to begin transmitting them.  Please contact edx@cdc.gov to request technical assistance or to begin the onboarding process.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika virus infection, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website.

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NNDSS Announces New Message Mapping Guides for Trichinellosis and Babesiosis HL7 Case Notifications
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), in collaboration with the CDC Division of Parasitic Diseases, Center for Global Health, is pleased to announce that finalized HL7 message mapping guides (MMGs) are now available for trichinellosis and babesiosis. Public health jurisdictions can prepare to send their disease notifications by using these MMGs, which are posted on the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center.

CDC developed these MMGs to support public health’s response needs as part of the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI). The NMI Technical Assistance and Onboarding teams are ready to assist jurisdictions in implementing the new messages and in obtaining approval to begin transmitting them.  Please contact edx@cdc.gov to request technical assistance or to begin the onboarding process.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika virus infection, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website.

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NNDSS Program Manager Vacancy Now Reposted
National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

For administrative reasons, CDC reposted the NNDSS Program Manager vacancy in the Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) as an Atlanta-based “Health Scientist (Informatics)” position (601-GS-14). It is available on USAJobs from 3/8/19 to 3/21/19 as the following:

CDC encourages all those who are interested in the position to apply. If you applied before, please be sure to re-apply to this posting.

Because the application is detailed and thorough, we recommend that applicants begin the submission process as quickly as possible and save their information frequently as they are working in the system.

If you have any questions, please contact Lesliann Helmus, DHIS associate director for surveillance, at lth7@cdc.gov.

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NNDSS Announces New Message Mapping Guide for Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases HL7 Case Notifications
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS), in collaboration with the CDC National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, is pleased to announce that a finalized HL7 message mapping guide (MMG) is now available for foodborne and diarrheal diseases (FDD). Public health jurisdictions can prepare to send their FDD diseases notifications by using this MMG, which is posted on the NNDSS HL7 Case Notification Resource Center at https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/case-notification/message-mapping-guides.html.

CDC developed this MMG to support public health’s response needs as part of the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI). The NMI Technical Assistance and Onboarding teams are ready to assist jurisdictions in implementing the new messages and in obtaining approval to begin transmitting them.  Please contact edx@cdc.gov to request technical assistance or to begin the onboarding process.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website at http://www.cdc.gov/nmi/index.html.

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NNDSS Publishes Finalized Annual Infectious Disease Data
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

CDC is pleased to announce that finalized 2017 National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) annual infectious disease data are now available as tables on the data and statistics section of the NNDSS webpage. In addition to links to the tables, hosted by the CDC Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiological Research (WONDER), the website provides detailed information about the data themselves.

Highlights of the tables include the following:

  • Table 1 displays reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and rates for the United States overall.
  • Tables 2a–2q display reported infectious notifiable disease state and territory specific case counts.
  • Table 3 displays reported infectious notifiable disease cases by month for the United States overall.
  • Tables 4–7 display reported infectious notifiable disease case counts and rates by age group, sex, race, and ethnicity, respectively, for the United States overall.

The list of nationally notifiable diseases for 2017 is available on the NNDSS website along with the respective national surveillance case definitions. Surveillance case definitions are a set of uniform criteria to define a disease or condition for public health surveillance. They enable public health to classify and count cases consistently across reporting jurisdictions.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, viral hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, and E. coli. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather data on these diseases from sources such as healthcare providers, hospitals, and laboratories and use the data to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

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Relaunched NMI Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center Improves User Navigation and Ease of Use
NNDSS - Nationally Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The CDC National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) Modernization Initiative (NMI) is pleased to announce the relaunch of the NMI Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center. The NMI team incorporated user feedback from subject matter experts, partners, and public health departments to completely overhaul the structure of the original site to improve user navigation and ease of use. The NMI Technical Assistance and Training Resource Center is a one-stop-shop for users to access the guidance, tools, and help they need to implement NNDSS HL7 case notification messages and to learn more about and request technical assistance.

Key Highlights
Key highlights of the new site include the following:

  • Easy Navigation: The new site provides easy navigation to three main topics of interest to users (arboviral implementation, all other conditions implementation, and technical assistance) directly from the home page.
  • Resource Roundup: The home page also includes a roundup of resources helpful to users, including information on eSHARE, Secure Access Management Services access, and new NMI job aids. In addition, the revamped site contains a new Resources page that bundles all resources together comprehensively.
  • Arboviral Implementation Instructions Upfront: For arboviral implementation, step-by-step implementation instructions moved to the top of the webpage and are highlighted so that users can quickly find them.
  • New Implementation Process Landing Page for All Other Conditions: For implementation of all other conditions, the new site completely overhauls how the implementation process is presented by adding an implementation process landing page, complete with clickable arrows that move users through the four phases of the process. Each phase of the process has its own landing page as well, with step-by-step instructions designed to help users navigate quickly through the information and pick up where they might have left off:
  • New Technical Assistance Information and Resources: The new site also includes a comprehensive technical assistance area with four key components:
  • New NMI Job Aids: In addition, the new site incorporates a new feature called “job aids” to assist users through the NMI implementation and onboarding process. The current eight job aids cover technical assistance and onboarding and are presented as downloadable PDFs on the new NMI Job Aids roundup webpage. More job aids are planned for the future.

About NNDSS
To protect Americans from serious disease, NNDSS helps public health monitor, control, and prevent about 120 diseases. These national notifiable diseases are important to monitor nationwide and include infectious diseases such as Zika, foodborne outbreaks such as E. coli, and noninfectious conditions such as lead poisoning. About 3,000 public health jurisdictions gather and use data on these diseases to protect their local communities. Through NNDSS, CDC receives and uses these data to keep people healthy and defend America from health threats.

About the NNDSS Modernization Initiative
NNDSS relies on the monitoring and disease control activities performed by local and state public health jurisdictions across the country. The NNDSS Modernization Initiative is making it faster and easier for public health jurisdictions to send data to CDC, and CDC is improving how we deliver these data to our disease programs.

As part of the NMI effort and through collaboration and commitment from subject matter experts across multiple CDC national centers and involvement of jurisdiction partners and other key stakeholders, CDC is developing and adopting new-generation MMGs for HL7 case notifications. With these guides, CDC will migrate from legacy messaging structures to the widely adopted HL7 standards that provide content standardization and interoperable message exchange structures. In addition to providing core data elements and data exchange formats, these new MMGs will satisfy CDC program requests for disease-specific variables for notifiable conditions.

The Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System is new CDC-built and operated software that supports the core functions of receiving, processing, and provisioning data for nationally notifiable diseases (NND) based on HL7 standards and new technology. MVPS validates and processes NND HL7 case notification messages sent by public health jurisdictions and provisions the data to CDC programs for their national surveillance efforts.

For more information about NMI, please access the NMI website.

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DHIS AD for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus Receives 2018 CSTE Distinguished Partner Award
NNDSS - National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System

The Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance (DHIS) is pleased to announce that DHIS Associate Director (AD) for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP, received the 2018 Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) Distinguished Partner Award. CSTE President Janet Hamilton, MPH; surveillance section administrator, Florida Department of Health; recognized Ms. Helmus for her achievements on June 12, 2018, at the CSTE President’s Banquet at the CSTE Annual Conference in West Palm Beach, Florida.

In her role as DHIS AD for Surveillance, Ms. Helmus coordinates surveillance activities within the division and acts as a liaison with surveillance activities in other parts of CDC. Prior to this position, she joined CDC in 2014 as the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) Program Manager in DHIS. In this role she oversaw NNDSS activities and coordinated the NNDSS Modernization Initiative (NMI), including working with teams to develop new HL7-based message mapping guides (MMGs); design the software to validate, process, and provision NNDSS data; and provide technical assistance to submitting jurisdictions as they implement the new messages.

Prior to her role at CDC, Ms. Helmus served in epidemiology and surveillance positions at the state level in both Ohio and Virginia and chaired the CSTE Surveillance Practice and Implementation Subcommittee for many years.

Kathryn Turner, PhD, MPH; CSTE Immediate Past Surveillance and Informatics Steering Committee Chair; and deputy state epidemiologist; chief, Bureau of Communicable Disease Prevention, Idaho Division of Public Health; nominated Ms. Helmus for the award for using her experience at both the state and federal levels to produce effective and valuable collaboration between CSTE and CDC in surveillance and informatics. She noted that Ms. Helmus has served on the planning committees of the CSTE Annual Conference Surveillance and Informatics Sunday Workshop and Surveillance and Informatics Track every year and is actively involved as a CSTE Associate Member in numerous subcommittee and workgroup activities.

In addition, Dr. Turner recognized that Ms. Helmus has been key to the progress of NMI and has actively solicited input from jurisdictions regarding how NMI could benefit their day-to-day activities and how the NMI process could be improved. Ms. Helmus’s leadership has led to improved CDC program participation in NMI and shortened MMG development time to less than half of what it was when the initiative began.

“Lesliann’s leadership at the national and state level, and within CSTE, combined with the significant dedication, energy, and enthusiasm she brings to our collective efforts deserve recognition,” stated Dr. Turner. “Lesliann represents the best of public health and her professional achievements are evidence of her outstanding commitment to the field of applied epidemiology.”

The CSTE Distinguished Partner Award recognizes an individual or organizational unit who makes significant contributions to CSTE and the work of its membership over the previous year. Selection criteria include:

  • active collaboration with CSTE, its leadership, and its members;
  • significant support of the CSTE mission; and
  • impact on CSTE.
Figure 1: DHIS AD for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP (left), receives the 2018 CSTE Distinguished Partner Award from CSTE President Janet Hamilton, MPH.

DHIS AD for Surveillance Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP (left), receives the 2018 CSTE Distinguished Partner Award from CSTE President Janet Hamilton, MPH.

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NMI Workshop—Monday, August 20, 2018

WSA2: National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System Modernization Initiative Message Mapping Guide: Implementation Technical Assistance Workshop ppt icon[4 MB, 59 Slides, 508]

Presenters: CDC and NMI partner, Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL)

Workshop facilitated by the NMI team, focused on the NMI implementation and onboarding process, and on NMI technical assistance.

  • NMI Pre-onboarding/Implementation
  • NMI Onboarding
  • NMI Evaluation
  • Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System (MVPS) Dashboard Feedback
  • Ask the Experts Panel: Featuring State and Local Health Departments

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Sharing Session—Tuesday, August 21, 2018

B06: Designing Reusable and Scalable Options for Public Health Data Exchange ppt icon[11 MB, 80 Slides, 508]

Presenters: APHL

Sharing session facilitated by APHL, focused on tools, resources, and processes that public health agencies can use to implement NNDSS HL7 case notifications as part of NMI.

The session included the following topics:

  • NMI Implementation Spreadsheet
  • Configurable Route Template in Orion Rhapsody
  • NMI Implementation and Technical Assistance Guidebook
  • Q & A

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Sharing Session—Tuesday, August 21, 2018

D01: NMI Update: Using Informatics to Streamline Notifiable Disease Data Submission and Improve Data Availability ppt icon[3 MB, 51 Slides, 508]

Presenters: CDC

Sharing session focused on the innovation, streamlined processes, and improved flexibility and re-usability of components that NMI has developed to help accelerate the transition to HL7 messaging for NNDSS case notifications.

The session included the following topics:

  • Introduction and Brief NMI Update
  • MVPS Update
  • Message Mapping Guide Authoring Tool (MMGAT) Overview
  • NMI Onboarding/Technical Assistance/Evaluation
  • Q & A

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Lightning Session—Tuesday, August 21, 2018

D05: Best Practices for Managing Public Health Informatics Data Exchange Projects ppt icon[9 MB, 53 Slides, 508]

Presenters: APHL

APHL Project Managers shared best practices for managing electronic data exchange project, illustrated through experiences delivering technical assistance across a variety of message use cases. Each presentation described an electronic data messaging project, and shared key management strategies used, considerations for ensuring scalable and maintainable solutions, and different approaches to tackling challenges that arise with public health information exchange.

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MMWR: Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks
Vol. 64, No. 54 – August 11, 2017

Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks: Surveillance Data Published Between April 1, 2016 and January 31, 2017 — United States
Kimberly Thomas, MPH; Ruth Jajosky, DMD; Ralph J. Coates, PhD; et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;64:1–6.

The Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks: Surveillance Data Published Between April 1, 2016 and January 31, 2017 — United States contains official statistics for nationally notifiable noninfectious conditions and disease outbreaks. The Summary includes a synopsis of major findings from published surveillance reports for nationally notifiable noninfectious conditions and disease outbreaks, internet links to the complete published surveillance reports, and links to data and tables displaying current and historical descriptive statistics for each condition.

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MMWR: Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases
Vol. 64, No. 53 – August 11, 2017

Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions — United States, 2015
Deborah A. Adams; Kimberly R. Thomas, MPH; Ruth Ann Jajosky, DMD; et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;64:1–143

Health care providers in the United States are required to report certain infectious diseases to a specified state or local authority. A disease is designated as notifiable if timely information about individual cases is considered necessary for prevention and control of the disease. Each year, CDC publishes a summary of the cases of notifiable disease reported for the most recent year for which data is available. This report presents a summary of notifiable diseases for 2015.

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NMI Highlighted in APHL Lab Matters Article
Presentation from the 2016 America Evaluation Association Annual Conference
October 27, 2016

Using a Mixed Methods Design for Public Health Informatics to Evaluate Capacity and Improve Services ppt icon[5.2 MB, 23 Slides, 508]

Authors:

  • Sebastian Romano, MPH; CDC
  • Virginia Dick, PhD; CSTE
  • Michele Hoover, MS; CDC

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2016 MMWR  Weekly infectious disease summary
Vol. 63, No. 54 – October 14, 2016

Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions — United States, 2014
Adams DA, Thomas KR, Jajosky R, et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;63(No. 54).

Health-care providers in the United States are required to report certain infectious diseases to a specified state or local authority. A disease is designated as notifiable if timely information about individual cases is considered necessary for prevention and control of the disease. Each year, CDC publishes a summary of the cases of notifiable disease reported for the most recent year for which data is available. This report presents a summary of notifiable diseases for 2014.

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2016 MMWR  Weekly noninfectious disease summary
Vol. 63, No. 55 – October 14, 2016

Introduction to the Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks — United States
Ralph J. Coates, PhD; Martha Stanbury, MSPH; Ruth Jajosky, DMD; et al.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;63:1–4

The 2016 Summary of Notifiable Noninfectious Conditions and Disease Outbreaks — United States contains official statistics for the occurrence of nationally notifiable noninfectious conditions and disease outbreaks and is published for the second time in the same volume of MMWR as the annual Summary of Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Conditions. The summary includes seven chapters addressing the following subjects: acute pesticide-related illness and injury arising from occupational exposure, acute nonoccupational pesticide-related illness and injury, cancer, elevated blood lead levels among children, elevated blood lead levels among adults, silicosis, and foodborne and waterborne disease outbreaks.

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Presentation from the 2016 Public Health Informatics Conference
August 24, 2016

NNDSS Modernization Initiative Update ppt icon[5.4 MB, 56 pages, 508]

Authors:

  • Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP; CDC
  • Ruth Jajosky, DMD, MPH; CDC
  • Andrew Kuehl, MIT, PMP; CDC
  • Michele Hoover, MS; CDC

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Video featuring Paula Yoon

National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System with Paula Yoon, ScD, MPH

Learn how notifiable disease surveillance works across public health.

Video featuring Lesliann Helmus

Conversations on public health surveillance with Lesliann Helmus, MS, CHTS-CP

Learn about recent improvements to notifiable disease surveillance at CDC.

CSTE presentation - National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System Modernization Initiative (NMI) Progress and Future Directions

National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System Modernization Initiative (NMI) Progress and Future Directions

View the recording from the 2019 CSTE Annual Meeting.media iconexternal icon

CSTE presentation - Enhancements to the Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System (MVPS)

Enhancements to the Message Validation, Processing, and Provisioning System (MVPS)

View the recording from the 2019 CSTE Annual Meeting.media iconexternal icon

CSTE presentation - Bring Your Own System: Implementing IIS Integration in a Public Health Surveillance System Using a System-Agnostic Approach for Interoperability

Bring Your Own System: Implementing IIS Integration in a Public Health Surveillance System Using a System-Agnostic Approach for Interoperability

View the recording from the 2019 CSTE Annual Meeting.media iconexternal icon

Video featuring Michael F. Iademarco, MD, MPH

Conversations on public health surveillance with Michael F. Iademarco, MD, MPH

Learn about the opportunities and challenges for public health surveillance.

Video featuring Hillard Weinstock, MD, MPH

Conversations on public health surveillance with Hillard Weinstock, MD, MPH

Learn why public health surveillance should take advantage of new and emerging technologies.

Page last reviewed: February 25, 2021