Organization of Work: Occupational Stress Index (OSI)

NOTE: This page is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated.

Workers putting puzzle pieces together

Occupational Stress Index (OSI)

http://unhealthywork.org/other-job-stress-models/occupational-stress-index-osiexternal icon

ID = 085

Content Area(s)

  • Benefits and compensation systems
  • Decision making processes
  • Flexibilization
  • Job content
  • Labor relations
  • Management of health and safety
  • Organizational culture or climate
  • Organizational structure (or restructuring)
  • Performance monitoring / incentives
  • Quality and process management initiatives
  • Social supports / relations
  • Workforce management
  • Work schedules (work hours)
  • Work rules

Instrument Type

Questionnaire

Occupation and Sector Specificity

Occupation(s): Generic, and specific for professional drivers, physicians, nurses, teachers, and those who work daily with computers.

Sector(s): Generic, and specific for transportation, health care, education.

Name and Size of Work Organization and/or Workplace Psychosocial Measures

Aversive physical exposures (7 items)

Conflict and uncertainty (15 items)

Disaster potential (9 items)

Extrinsic time pressure (5 items)

High demand (20 items)

Strictness (12 items)

Underload (11 items)

Other Content Areas Included in the Instrument

None

Developmental Status of the Instrument

Instrument used widely; well-defined properties.

Languages

Original: English

Other: Swedish, Bosnian and Serbian. Translation and back-translation is ongoing in a number of other languages.

Reliability and Validity Information (or Relevant Citation)

Belkic K, The Occupational Stress Index: An Approach Derived from Cognitive Ergonomics and Brain Research for Clinical Practice, Cambridge International Science Publishers, 2003 ISBN: 1-898326-02-9.

Selected Reference

Belkic K, Occupation-specific versus general self-report measures to assess psychosocial workplace exposures: dilemmas and potential solutions to bridge the gap. X2001 – Exposure Assessment in Epidemiology and Practice, Arbete och Halsa, pp. 258-260.

Accessibility of the Instrument

Registration Required

User Fees

None

Where to Obtain a Copy of the Instrument

kbelkic@hsc.usc.edu or Karen.Belkic@radfys.ki.se

Page last reviewed: June 14, 2017