DEEPWATER HORIZON RESPONSE

Summary of Potential Hazards to Deepwater Horizon Response Workers

Potential Hazard Risk Assessment Evaluation Criteria Recommendation
Cardiovascular Disease Pre-placement physical: BMI*, BP, pulse Physician’s evaluation For excess risk, assign to light duty, low demands, air conditioned environment
Heat Stress Temperature, humidity, work load Health surveillance Training program, acclimatization, monitored hydration, work-rest regimen
Traumatic Incident Stress Mental and emotional health Physical complaints, thinking problems, changes in behavior, mood, irritability Maintain adequate nutrition, hydration, rest; work in pairs to look out for buddy
Fatigue Work hours and schedules Management of hours worked Shifts < 10 hours; 2 rest days after 3 12-hour shifts or 4 10-hour shifts or 5 8-hour shifts; frequent rest breaks
Chemicals Air sampling, monitoring symptoms OELs, reported symptoms, irritation Organic vapor cartridge respirators, protective clothing, protective eyewear
Particulate Air sampling, monitoring symptoms OELs, visual observation, reported symptoms P100 air-purifying respirators, protective eyewear
Odor Sense of smell Workers bothered by odors Voluntary use of carbon-impregnated P95 filtering facepiece respirator

* Abbreviations: BMI = body mass index; BP = blood pressure; OELs = occupational exposure limits; P95 = NIOSH-approved particulate filtering respirator that is strongly resistant to oil and filters at least 95% of airborne particles; P100 = NIOSH-approved particulate filtering respirator that is strongly resistant to oil and filters at least 99.97% of airborne particles.

Page last reviewed: May 15, 2018 (archived document)