Related Web Resources

CDC Climate and Health
The CDC climate and public health framework was established due to a recognition by several scientists that there was a need to prepare for the inevitability of climate change, and the impact it would likely have on the health of US residents and the world population in general. In FY2009, CDC formally established its Climate and Health Program.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)External
The IPCC is a scientific body under the backings of the United Nations (UN). It reviews and assesses the most recent scientific, technical and socio-economic information produced worldwide relevant to the understanding of climate change.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Climate ChangeExternal
The EPA has information regarding collecting greenhouse gas emissions data, reducing emissions and promoting clean energy, research contributions, partnerships, and helping communities plan and prepare for climate change.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Climate Change and Human HealthExternal
NIEHS has information on climate change-related engagement and education, health impacts, ongoing activities, research and funding opportunities, and other resources.

U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) Link Climate and HealthExternal
USGCRP coordinates climate and health-related research and monitoring, vulnerability and risk assessments, and communication, education, and engagement efforts across the Federal Government, in partnership with organizations in the United States and around the world.

USGCRP 2014 National Climate Assessment Report: Human HealthExternal
Climate change threatens human health and well-being in many ways, including impacts from increased extreme weather events, wildfire, decreased air quality, and illnesses transmitted by food, water, and diseases carriers such as mosquitoes and ticks. Explore impacts to human health.

MedlinePlus Climate ChangeExternal
MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health’s Web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, it brings you information about issues in language you can understand.

Page last reviewed: December 6, 2016