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The impact of diet and betel nut use on skin lesions associated with drinking-water arsenic in Pabna, Bangladesh.

Authors
McCarty KM; Houseman EA; Quamruzzaman Q; Rahman M; Mahiuddin G; Smith T; Ryan L; Christiani DC
Source
Environ Health Perspect 2006 Mar; 114(3):334-340
NIOSHTIC No.
20057651
Abstract
An established exposure-response relationship exists between water arsenic levels and skin lesions. Results of previous studies with limited historical exposure data, and laboratory animal studies suggest that diet may modify arsenic metabolism and toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the effect of diet on the risk of arsenic-related skin lesions in Pabna, Bangladesh. Six hundred cases and 600 controls loosely matched on age and sex were enrolled at Dhaka Community Hospital, Bangladesh, in 2001-2002. Diet, demographic data, and water samples were collected. Water samples were analyzed for arsenic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Betel nut use was associated with a greater risk of skin lesions in a multivariate model [odds ratio (OR) = 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.36]. Modest decreases in risk of skin lesions were associated with fruit intake 1-3 times/month (OR = 0.68; 95%CI, 0.51-0.89) and canned goods at least 1 time/month (OR = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.20-0.86). Bean intake at least 1 time/day (OR = 1.89; 95% CI, 1.11-3.22) was associated with increased odds of skin lesions. Betel nut use appears to be associated with increased risk of developing skin lesions in Bangladesh. Increased intake of fruit and canned goods may be associated with reduced risk of lesions. Increased intake of beans may be associated with an increased risk of skin lesions. The results of this study do not provide clear support for a protective effect of vegetable and overall protein consumption against the development of skin lesions, but a modest benefit cannot be excluded.
Keywords
Arsenic; Diet; Skin lesions; Skin exposure; Exposure levels; Risk factors; Animals; Laboratory animals; Metabolism; Toxins; Humans; Men; Women; Age groups; Demographic characteristics; Water sampling; Sampling; Mass spectrometry; Models; Statistical analysis; Author Keywords: arsenic; Bangladesh; betel nut; case-control; diet
Contact
D.C. Christiani, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Building I 1408, 665 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115
CODEN
EVHPAZ
CAS No.
7440-38-2
Publication Date
20060301
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
dchristi@hsph.harvard.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-T42-OH-008416
Issue of Publication
3
ISSN
0091-6765
Source Name
Environmental Health Perspectives
State
MA
Performing Organization
Harvard School of Public Health
Page last reviewed: May 11, 2023
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division