NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Working with influenza-like illness: presenteeism among US health care personnel during the 2014-2015 influenza season.

Authors
Chiu S; Black CL; Yue X; Greby SM; Laney AS; Campbell AP; de Perio MA
Source
Am J Infect Control 2017 Nov; 45(11):1254-1258
NIOSHTIC No.
20049877
Abstract
Background: Health care personnel (HCP) working while experiencing influenza-like illness (ILI) contribute to influenza transmission in health care settings. Studies focused on certain HCP occupations or work settings have demonstrated that some HCP often continue to work while ill. Methods: Using a national nonprobability Internet panel survey of 1,914 HCP during the 2014-2015 influenza season, we calculated the frequency of working with self-reported ILI (ie, fever and cough or sore throat) and examined reasons for working with ILI by occupation and work setting. Results: Overall, 414 (21.6%) HCP reported ILI, and 183 (41.4%) reported working with ILI (median, 3 days; range, 0-30 days). Pharmacists (67.2%) and physicians (63.2%) had the highest frequency of working with ILI. By work setting, hospital-based HCP had the highest frequency of working with ILI (49.3%). The most common reasons for working while ill included still being able to perform job duties and not feeling bad enough to miss work. Among HCP at long-term care facilities, the most common reason was inability to afford lost pay. Conclusions: More than 40% of HCP with ILI work while ill. To reduce HCP-associated influenza transmission, potential interventions could target HCP misconceptions about working while ill and paid sick leave policies.
Keywords
Health care personnel; Influenza; Infectious diseases; Disease transmission; Viral infections; Viral diseases; Medical personnel; Occupational health; Preventive medicine; Health care facilities; Work environment; Health surveys; Pharmacists; Physicians; Costs; Work performance; Intervention; Surveillance; Author Keywords: Ill; Sick leave; Occupational health
Contact
Sophia Chiu, MD, MPH, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1090 Tusculum Ave, Mailstop R-9, Cincinnati, OH 45226-1938
CODEN
AJICDC
Publication Date
20171101
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
yjx9@cdc.gov
Fiscal Year
2018
Issue of Publication
11
ISSN
0196-6553
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS; RHD
Priority Area
Services
Source Name
American Journal of Infection Control
State
OH; GA; WV
Page last reviewed: September 4, 2020
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division