NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Cardiovascular fitness levels among American workers.

Authors
Lewis-JE; Clark-JD III; LeBlanc-WG; Fleming-LE; Cabán-Martinez-AJ; Arheart-KL; Tannenbaum-SL; Ocasio-MA; Davila-EP; Kachan-D; McCollister-K; Dietz-N; Bandiera-FC; Clarke-TC; Lee-DJ
Source
J Occup Environ Med 2011 Oct; 53(10):1115-1121
NIOSHTIC No.
20040310
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To explore cardiovascular fitness in 40 occupations using a nationally representative sample of the US population. METHODS: Respondents aged 18 to 49 years (N = 3354) from the 1999 to 2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were evaluated for cardiovascular fitness and classified into low, moderate, and high levels. Comparisons were made among occupations. RESULTS: Of all the US workers, 16% had low, 36% moderate, and 48% high cardiovascular fitness. Administrators, health occupations, wait staff, personal services, and agricultural occupations had a lesser percentage of workers with low cardiovascular fitness compared with all others. Sales workers, administrative support, and food preparers had a higher percentage of workers with low cardiovascular fitness compared with all others. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiovascular fitness varies significantly across occupations, and those with limited physical activity have higher percentages of low cardiovascular fitness. Workplace strategies are needed to promote cardiovascular fitness among high-risk occupations.
Keywords
Humans; Men; Women; Cardiovascular-disease; Cardiovascular-function; Cardiovascular-system; Cardiovascular-system-disease; Cardiovascular-system-disorders; Physical-fitness; Statistical-analysis; Epidemiology
Contact
John E. Lewis, PhD, 1120 NW 14th St, Ste 1474 (D21), Miami, FL 33136
CODEN
JOEMFM
Publication Date
20111001
Document Type
Journal Article
Email Address
jelewis@miami.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2012
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-003915
Issue of Publication
10
ISSN
1076-2752
Source Name
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
State
FL
Performing Organization
University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
Page last reviewed: May 5, 2020
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division