NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Repetitive finger joint flexion without external load leads to articular cartilage thinning in an in vivo rabbit model.

Authors
Marecek-GS; Opel-CF; Rempel-DM; King-KB
Source
Trans Annu Meet Orthop Res Soc 2006 Mar; 52:1898
NIOSHTIC No.
20033284
Abstract
Repetitive hand tasks are a risk factor for the development of musculoskeletal disorders, including degenerative joint disease [1,2]. Additionally, high occupational loads have been described as a risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis [3,4]. However, few studies have identified repetitive use independent of loading as a risk factor for joint injury. Thus, it remains unclear which component, repetition frequency or force, is primarily responsible for joint damage. To examine the difference in the effect of frequency vs. force, we have developed a novel in vivo animal model of cyclic joint loading [5]. In this model, the rabbit forepaw digits can be flexed with or without an added external load. This study compares the changes in articular cartilage thickness caused by repetition alone to those changes caused by repetition plus an external load.
Keywords
In-vivo-studies; Models; Injuries; Laboratory-animals; Animal-studies; Muscles; Repetitive-work; Cumulative-trauma-disorders; Cumulative-trauma; Musculoskeletal-system; Musculoskeletal-system-disorders; Biomechanics; Hand-injuries
Publication Date
20060301
Document Type
Abstract; Conference/Symposia Proceedings
Email Address
kbking@itsa.ucsf.edu
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007786; Grant-Number-R01-OH-007359
ISSN
0149-6433
Priority Area
Disease and Injury: Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Upper Extremities
Source Name
Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society
State
CA; CO
Performing Organization
University of California - San Francisco
Page last reviewed: March 11, 2019
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division