NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Computational fluid dynamics investigation of particle inhalability.

Authors
Anthony TR; Flynn MR
Source
J Aerosol Sci 2006 Jan; 36:750-765
NIOSHTIC No.
20029195
Abstract
This study uses computational fluid dynamics to investigate particle aspiration at the low air velocities typical of occupational settings. A realistic representation of a human head on a simpler geometric torso was positioned facing the wind(0.2,0.4ms-1), and breathing was simulated using constant inhalation(1.8,4.3ms-1). Aspiration was simulated using laminar transport for particles 0.3-116 um. Results from the 0.4ms-1freestream and 4.3ms-1inhalation rate compared well with results from the literature for smaller particles. For particles >= 68um, simulations yielded smaller aspiration efficiencies than reported in experiments. For all low velocity conditions studied, the aspiration efficiency curve dropped well below the 50% recommended by the ACGIH in the forward-facing orientation. Additional investigation of aspiration efficiency at other orientations relative to the wind is recommended to fully investigate aspiration efficiency for large particles in occupational environments.
Keywords
Particulates; Airborne-particles; Air-contamination; Gravimetric-analysis; Aerosols; Aerosol-particles; Computer-models; Models; Author Keywords: Size-selective sampling; Inhalable particles; Modeling; Computational fluid dynamics
Contact
University of North Carolina, Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
CODEN
JALSB7
Publication Date
20060101
Document Type
Journal Article
Funding Amount
719405
Funding Type
Grant
Fiscal Year
2006
Identifying No.
Grant-Number-R01-OH-007363; Grant-Number-T01-CCT-910446
ISSN
0021-8502
Priority Area
Research Tools and Approaches: Exposure Assessment Methods
Source Name
Journal of Aerosol Science
State
NC; AZ
Performing Organization
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Page last reviewed: May 15, 2020
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division