NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

Beryllium disease natural history and exposure-response.

Authors
Newman-LS
Source
NIOSH 2002 Jan; :1-17
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
20022216
Abstract
BeS progresses to CBD at a rate of 7-11 % per year. Beryllium-sensitized patients merit medical counseling and surveillance for signs of progression to disease. Medical surveillance identifies individuals with CBD of whom 22% progress to treatment with steroids. Parameters that seem to best predict progression specific to CBD are changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) over time and changes in A-a gradient with exercise. More than 50% of the beryllium machining particles in the breathing zone were less than 10 m in aerodynamic diameter. This small particle size may result in beryllium deposition into the deepest portion of the lung and may explain elevated rates of sensitization among beryllium machinists. A high percentage of the particles generated during machining are less than 0.6microm in aerodynamic diameter and from 8% to 10% of the aerosol generated may be deposited in the deep portions of the lung. Measurable beryllium contamination on workers hands and inside their vehicles indicates that take-home beryllium exposure is still a significant risk. Worker risk notification programs can positively affect workers self-protective attitudes and behaviors.
Keywords
Occupational-respiratory-disease; Lung-disease; Respiratory-system-disorders; Blood-analysis; Work-environment; Genetic-factors; Lymphocytes; Bronchial-cancer; Biological-effects
Contact
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, 1400 Jackson street, Denver, CO 80206
CAS No.
7440-41-7
Publication Date
20020124
Document Type
Final Cooperative Agreement Report
Funding Amount
1980104
Funding Type
Cooperative Agreement
Fiscal Year
2002
NTIS Accession No.
PB2004-104522
NTIS Price
A03
Identifying No.
Cooperative-Agreement-Number-U60-CCU-812221
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
CO
Performing Organization
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Denver, Colorado
Page last reviewed: April 12, 2019
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division