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Industrial hygiene survey report of Seattle Metro, Ryerson Base, Seattle, Washington.

Authors
Piacitelli G
Source
Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, IWS 163-2-01, 1990 Aug; :1-23
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00197971
Abstract
In an effort to evaluate worker exposure, personal protective equipment and engineering controls during the refueling, repairing, and operating methanol (67561) powered transit buses, a visit was made to the Seattle Metro Ryerson Base (SIC-4111) located in Seattle, Washington. The worst case 8 hour time weighted average was estimated to be only 5 parts per million (ppm). Instantaneous measurements occasionally indicated concentrations up to 2200ppm while draining fuel lines and up to 1400ppm during refueling. No quantifiable methanol vapors were found in the passenger compartment of an operating bus nor were any combustion products detected except in the immediate exhaust stream. Improvements in personal protection and work practices were suggested which included the regular wearing of safety goggles and impermeable elbow length gloves when fueling or opening fuel lines, modifying work practices, regular inspection and immediate repair of fuel line fittings, utilizing engineering controls which minimize the release of methanol liquid or vapors, and developing a plan of action between all responsible parties and providing the appropriate training in the event of a methanol spill or fire.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; NIOSH-Survey; Field-Study; IWS-163-2-01; Region-10; Bus-drivers; Maintenance-workers; Automobile-repair-shops; Fuels; Organic-vapors; Alcohols
CAS No.
67-56-1
Publication Date
19900810
Document Type
Field Studies; Industry Wide
Fiscal Year
1990
NTIS Accession No.
PB91-189019
NTIS Price
A03
Identifying No.
IWS-163-2-01
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
SIC Code
4111
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
WA; OH
Page last reviewed: March 11, 2019
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division