NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

A comparison of four personal sampling methods for the determination of mercury vapor.

Authors
McCammon CS Jr.; Edwards SL; Hull RD; Woodfin WJ
Source
Am Ind Hyg Assoc J 1980 Jul; 41(7):528-531
NIOSHTIC No.
00170679
Abstract
Four methods currently in use for the determination of personal exposure to mercury (7439976) vapor were compared. The four methods tested included the 3M passive Mercury Vapor Monitoring System, the tandem mercury sampling tube method developed by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories, the hopcalite tube method, and the iodine impregnated charcoal tube method. Each of the four sampling devices was exposed simultaneously to the same mercury vapor containing atmosphere at nominal mercury vapor concentrations of 0.05, 0.1 or sampling devices were described. At a mercury concentration of the Los Alamos procedure and the iodine charcoal method showed significant differences, but no other means compared two at a time were significantly different. At high mercury concentrations there were no significant differences between any of the means derived by the four procedures. The iodine charcoal tube method provided acceptable precision only at higher loadings of about 3 micrograms of mercury per tube. Of the four methods tested, all but the iodine charcoal tube method were demonstrated to give precise and reproducible mercury concentration determinations in the 0.05 to 0.2 mg/m3 range.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; Air-monitoring; Air-sampling-equipment; Mercury-vapors; Measurement-equipment; Monitoring-systems; Analytical-instruments; Equipment-reliability
Contact
Charles S. McCammon, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluation, and Field Studies, 4676 Columbia Parkway, Cincinnati, Ohio 45226
CODEN
AIHAAP
CAS No.
7439-97-6
Publication Date
19800701
Document Type
Journal Article
Fiscal Year
1980
Issue of Publication
7
ISSN
0002-8894
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS; DPSE
Source Name
American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal
State
OH
Page last reviewed: September 11, 2020
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division