NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search

HHE Report No. HHE-80-199-948, American Standard, Inc., Louisville, Kentucky.

Authors
Lucas AD; Horan J
Source
Cincinnati, OH: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, HHE 80-199-948, 1981 Sep; :1-37
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00123593
Abstract
Personal and environmental air samples were analyzed for metal fumes, respirable dust and silica (7631869), carbon-monoxide (630080), and environmental temperatures were measured at American Standard, Incorporated (SIC-3479) in Louisville, Kentucky on July 14 to 16 and September 22 to 24, 1980. In addition, medical questionnaires were administered and blood lead (7439921) concentrations were analyzed. The potential threat of Legionnaires Disease was also stressed. An authorized employee representative requested the evaluation of behalf of an unspecified number of workers. Atmospheric lead concentrations ranged from 26 to 162 micrograms per cubic meter, compared with the NIOSH recommended standard of 50 micrograms per cubic meter as an eight hour time weighted average. Carbon-monoxide and silica concentrations were not found in toxic concentrations. Heat stress measurements with a wet bulb globe thermometer (WBGT) ranged from 86 degrees F to 102 degrees F WBGT. The NIOSH recommended criteria for occupational exposure to hot environments requires that certain work practices be initiated when the exposure is continuous for one hour and the time weighted average WBGT exceeds 79 degrees F for men or 76 degrees F for women. The clinical presentation of employee symptoms was not typical of Legionellosis. Eight enamelers had blood lead concentrations greater than 39 micrograms per milliliter. The 116 other employees all had blood lead concentrations below 40 micrograms per milliliter, considered the upper limit of normal. The authors conclude that the principle cause of employee symptoms was the extremely hot working environment, and that elevated atmospheric lead concentrations, contributed to increasing blood lead in some enamelers. They recommend several measures to reduce heat stress, a reduction of dust concentrations, implementation of good housekeeping, and medical monitoring of affected workers.
Keywords
NIOSH-Author; HHE-80-199-948; NIOSH-Health-Hazard-Evaluation; Hazards-Confirmed; Region-4; Air-sampling; Heat-stress; Health-surveys
CAS No.
7631-86-9; 630-08-0; 7439-92-1
Publication Date
19810901
Document Type
Field Studies; Health Hazard Evaluation
Fiscal Year
1981
NTIS Accession No.
PB83-127373
NTIS Price
A04
Identifying No.
HHE-80-199-948
NIOSH Division
DSHEFS
SIC Code
3479
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
KY; OH
Page last reviewed: April 12, 2019
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division