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Survivorship Models for Lung Cancer Mortality in Uranium Miners - Is Cumulative Dose an Appropriate Measure of Exposure?

Authors
Hornung-RW; Samuels-S
Source
Radiation Hazards In Mining: Control, Measurement, and Medical Aspects, October 4-9, 1981, Golden, Colorado. Gomez M, ed., New York: Society of Mining Engineers, 1981 Jan; :363-368
Link
NIOSHTIC No.
00122790
Abstract
Survivorship models for lung cancer mortality in uranium (7440611) miners were compared via an application to epidemiological data for four western states. The research sample comprised 3344 white male underground uranium miners who were studied by the U.S. Public Health Service. Test variables included age at first employment, calendar year of first employment, height, smoking history, cumulative working level month exposure, and dose rate. The regression coefficient for dose in working level months was plotted against lag time from final cumulative dose. The authors note that the proportional hazards model has certain advantages over the more common life table approach in studying mortality in occupational cohorts. They conclude that total cumulative dose may not be the dose measure of choice in predicting survival from lung cancer; the dose relationship appears to be curvilinear downward at higher cumulative concentrations of radiation exposure; no significant interaction exists between smoking and radiation dose; and dose rate appears to be a significant factor in lung cancer mortality in uranium miners.
Keywords
Mine-workers; Radioactive-heavy-metals; Lung-disorders; Cancer-rate; Mining-industry; Radiation-exposure; Radiation-hazards;
CAS No.
7440-61-1;
Publication Date
19810101
Fiscal Year
1981
Source Name
Radiation Hazards In Mining: Control, Measurement, and Medical Aspects, October 4-9, 1981, Golden, Colorado, M. Gomez, ed., Society of Mining Engineers, New York, NY
State
CO; NY;
Page last reviewed: April 12, 2019
Content source: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division