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Criteria for a recommended standard... occupational exposure to phosgene.

Authors
NIOSH
Source
Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHEW (NIOSH) Publication No. 76-137, 1976 Jan; :1-138
NIOSHTIC No.
00052750
Abstract
Recommendations for a phosgene standard designed to protect the health and safety of workers up to a 10-hour workday, 40-hour workweek over a working lifetime. Compliance with the standard should prevent adverse effects of phosgene on the health and safety of workers. Occupational exposure to phosgene (75445) is defined as exposure above half the recommended time-weighted average environmental limit. Topics covered include: concentration, sampling and analysis of phosgene in the workplace air; annual medical examination of occupationally exposed workers; personal protective equipment and clothing; informing employees of phosgene hazards; work practices; sanitation practices; biological effects of exposure according to epidemiology, animal toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity data; environmental concentrations and engineering controls.
Keywords
NIOSH-Publication; NIOSH-Contract; Contract-099-73-0036; Toxic-gases; Exposure-limits; Air-quality-control; Respiratory-irritants; Safety-engineering; Toxicology; Safety-equipment; Preventive-medicine; Air-sampling; Sampling-methods; Safety-practices; Safety-training; Air-monitoring
CAS No.
75-44-5
Publication Date
19760101
Document Type
Numbered Publication; Criteria Document
Funding Type
Contract
Fiscal Year
1976
NTIS Accession No.
PB-267514
NTIS Price
A08
Identifying No.
DHEW (NIOSH) Publication No. 76-137; Contract-099-73-0036
NIOSH Division
DCDSD
Source Name
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
State
MD; WA
Performing Organization
The University of Washington, School of Public Health and Community Medicine
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