Example 2

Example #2: Find data on work-related MVC fatalities by industry using the first highlighted table, Table A-6Cdc-pdfExternal.

 

TABLE A-6. Fatal occupational injuries resulting from transportation incidents and homicides by occupation, all United States, 2014*

Occupation1

Total fatal injuries (number)

Transportation incidents2 Homicides2
Total Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicle Nonroadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles Pedestrian vehicular incidents Total Shooting by other person– intentional

Motor vehicle operators

979

739

619

12

87

50

38

Bus drivers

18

13

11

Bus drivers, transit and intercity

6

5

5

Bus drivers, school or special client

12

8

6

Driver/sales workers and truck drivers

880

684

571

11

81

19

13

Driver/sales workers

59

39

35

12

7

Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers

761

596

490

11

78

6

5

Taxi drivers and chauffeurs

68

29

26

3

31

25

Taxi drivers and chauffeurs

68

29

26

3

31

25

Miscellaneous motor vehicle operators

13

13

11

*The data shown above can be found on p. 19 of this table.

Here’s what you need to know:

Occupation is the worker’s job, regardless of the employer’s main type of business. For example, in the table extract above, truck drivers may have been employed by a trucking firm, a retail business, or a construction company.

Interpreting the data correctly depends on understanding how occupations are defined. One occupational category for motor vehicle operators that is easy to misinterpret is driver/sales workers. One might make an educated guess that this is a broad category of sales workers whose jobs require them to drive, but in fact this occupation is defined much more narrowly: “Drive truck or other vehicle over established routes or within an established territory and sell or deliver goods, such as food products, including restaurant take-out items, or pick up or deliver items such as commercial laundry. May also take orders, collect payment, or stock merchandise at point of delivery. Includes newspaper delivery drivers…” Looking carefully at the occupation definitions also helps you make other important distinctions, for example, between drivers of light and heavy trucks.

Get detailed descriptions for each occupation in BLS tablesCdc-pdfExternal. The motor vehicle operator occupations discussed in this article appear on pages 188-189.

Access more detailed information on all the coding systems BLS uses to classify industry, occupation, and injury events in CFOI dataExternal.

Page last reviewed: February 24, 2017