Mining Publication: Early Fire Detection for Underground Diesel Fuel Storage Areas

Original creation date: October 2018

Authors: L Yuan, R Thomas, J Rowland, L Zhou

Peer Reviewed Journal Article - October 2018

NIOSHTIC2 Number: 20052359

Process Saf Environ Prot 2018 Oct; 119:69-74

With the increased use of mobile diesel-powered equipment in underground mines, the fire risk posed by underground diesel fuel storage areas is a concern. To reduce the risk associated with the storage and transfer of large quantities of diesel fuel in permanent underground mine storage areas, an experimental study was conducted to investigate the responses of different sensors for early detection of diesel fuel fires in a storage area. Fire sensors tested in this study were four carbon monoxide (CO) sensors, two smoke sensors, and one flame sensor. A series of fire tests were conducted in the NIOSH Safety Research Coal Mine, Bruceton, PA, using various fire sizes at different ventilation airflow velocities and fire locations. Response times for different sensors were analyzed, and the results suggest that the flame sensor and smoke sensors resulted in shorter response times in most tests compared to the CO sensors. Based on the test results, the appropriate sensor locations for early fire detection in a diesel fuel storage area were identified. The results of this study can help mining companies to select appropriate fire sensors for underground diesel fuel storage areas and improve the deployment of these sensors to ensure the safety of underground miners.

First page of Early Fire Detection for Underground Diesel Fuel Storage Areas
Peer Reviewed Journal Article - October 2018

NIOSHTIC2 Number: 20052359

Process Saf Environ Prot 2018 Oct; 119:69-74


Page last reviewed: 10/23/2018 Page last updated: 10/23/2018