Track Chairs

TRACK A: Increasing Knowledge of HIV Status

Lisa Belcher, PhD – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Lisa Belcher, PhD – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Lisa Belcher, PhD, leads the monitoring and evaluation of CDC-funded HIV prevention programs as the Chief of the Program Evaluation Branch in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP), National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP). Dr. Belcher is responsible for the quality assurance of grantee-submitted program data, Rapid Feedback Reports (RFRs) for DHAP health department and CBO grantees, national annual reports, peer-reviewed publications, national partner data inquiries and requests, and collaborations with other DHAP branches on demonstration projects and work groups.

Prior to her role as a Branch Chief, Dr. Belcher led the HIV Testing Monitoring and Evaluation Team in the Program Evaluation Branch and was a Behavioral Scientist in DHAP’s Prevention Research Branch. She earned her BA, MS and Ph.D. in community psychology from Georgia State University.

Julie Myers, MD, MPH – New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Julie Myers, MD, MPH, – New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Julie Myers, MD, MPH, is the Director for HIV Prevention in the Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. She leads the New York City Health Department’s efforts to support implementation of PrEP and PEP citywide, and her work includes promoting HIV self-testing through online recruitment and community partnerships. She has also spearheaded the use of diverse data sources to monitor implementation of PrEP and PEP in New York City.

Dr. Myers also works as an HIV primary care physician at Columbia University where she is an Instructor in Medicine in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Myers received her MD from Cornell University and her master’s degree in public health from Columbia University. She completed her Primary Care-Internal Medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and Infectious Diseases fellowship at Columbia.

Prior to joining the New York City health department, she studied HIV treatment outcomes in community-based settings and transmitted drug resistance among people living with HIV in the Dominican Republic. She got her start in HIV prevention as a volunteer with the Lower East Side Needle Exchange Program before starting medical school.

TRACK B: Preventing HIV Acquisition

A.D. McNaghten, PhD, MHSA – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
A.D. McNaghten, PhD, MHSA – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A.D. McNaghten, PhD, MHSA, is the Chief of the Capacity Building Branch (CBB) in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) in CDC’s NCHHSTP. CBB supports the nation’s HIV prevention workforce to develop and implement effective HIV prevention strategies.

Dr. McNaghten has over 20 years of experience in HIV epidemiology and prevention research. She has served as a Principal Investigator and Project Officer for several international and domestic projects involving HIV testing and linkage to care, PrEP uptake, monitoring disease progression, and prescription and impact of antiretroviral therapies among persons with HIV.

Dr. McNaghten received her MHSA and PhD from Ohio University.

Hyman Scott, MD, MPH – San Francisco Department of Public Health
Hyman Scott, MD, MPH – San Francisco Department of Public Health

Hyman Scott, MD, MPH, is the Clinical Research Medical Director at Bridge HIV in the San Francisco Department of Public Health, and an Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He has a particular interest in the epidemiology of HIV-related racial/ethnic disparities among men who have sex with men (MSM), and interventions to reduce these disparities. Dr. Scott’s research focuses on using technology to expand uptake of HIV/STI testing and PrEP, and implementation of the HIV prevention clinical trials.

Dr. Scott received his undergraduate degree from Stanford University, his MD from Yale School of Medicine, and his MPH from the University of California, Berkeley.

TRACK C: Reducing HIV Transmission

Buzz Prejean, PhD – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Buzz Prejean, PhD – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Joseph (Buzz) Prejean, PhD, is the Chief of the Behavioral and Clinical Surveillance Branch (BCSB) in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. He oversees the implementation of two national HIV surveillance systems, the Medical Monitoring Project, and National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, and one large research project evaluating the performance of multiple tests used for HIV diagnosis.

Prior to joining CDC as a behavioral scientist in 2002, Dr. Prejean worked as a clinical psychologist providing mental health and HIV prevention services in one of the first HIV prevention programs to be integrated into an HIV care clinic at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. At CDC he has served as a behavioral scientist working in DHAP’s Capacity Building Branch, and as the Team Lead for the Incidence and Viral Resistance Team in the HIV Incidence and Case Surveillance Branch, implementing CDC’s HIV incidence surveillance and viral resistance surveillance (later molecular surveillance) systems. Since 2012 he has led BCSB providing data to describe clinical outcomes and HIV risk and prevention behaviors among persons diagnosed with and at risk for HIV infection.

Dr. Prejean received his BA in psychology from Washington University in St. Louis, and PhD in clinical psychology from Louisiana State University.

Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, MPH – University of North Carolina School of Medicine
Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, MPH – University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, MPH, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Medicine at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine where she is affiliated with the Center for Health Equity Research. Prior to joining the faculty at UNC, Dr. Poteat served as core faculty in the Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health and Human Rights, and a Physician Assistant in the John G. Bartlett Specialty Practice at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Over the past 20 years, Dr. Poteat has been deeply engaged in the HIV response both domestically and globally, including six years with the Global AIDS Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and two years with the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator. Her current research, teaching, and practice focus on HIV among sexual and gender minorities with particular attention to the role of stigma in driving health disparities.

Dr. Poteat received a Master of Medical Science degree from Emory University’s Physician Assistant (PA) Program; a Masters of Public Health from Rollins School of Public Health; and a PhD in the Social and Behavioral Interventions Program in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

TRACK D: Detecting and Interrupting HIV Transmission

Alexa Oster, MD – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Alexa Oster, MD – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Alexandra Oster, MD, leads CDC’s efforts to use molecular and other data to systematically detect HIV transmission clusters and outbreaks and intervene to prevent transmission. She also serves as a member of the leadership team for the National HIV Surveillance System, CDC’s primary system for monitoring the burden of HIV in the United States.

Dr. Oster joined CDC in 2007 as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention and later held a position working with National HIV Behavioral Surveillance. She has authored or coauthored more than 70 publications on a variety of topics, including molecular epidemiology, HIV among gay and bisexual men, behavioral and clinical surveillance, HIV testing and care, and HIV-related disparities.

Dr. Oster is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine and completed her residency in Primary Care Internal Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco/San Francisco General Hospital. She has also held leadership positions in the emergency responses to H1N1 influenza, Ebola, and Zika.

Susan Little, MD – University of California, San Diego
Susan Little, MD, – University of California, San Diego

Susan Little, MD, is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). She is a graduate of Washington University School of Medicine. She completed her internal medicine residency at Washington University School of Medicine and her Infectious Diseases Fellowship at UCSD.

Dr. Little conducts translational clinical research focused on the pathogenesis, prevention and treatment of acute and very recent HIV infection. She is the director of the Primary Infection Research Program and Co-Director of the UCSD Antiviral Research Center. She has been heavily involved in studies to evaluate of the epidemiologic, behavioral, biologic, virologic, and host factors that contribute to HIV transmission and the design of novel approaches to screen and identify acutely infected individuals. She is actively involved in the training and mentoring of students, post-doctoral research fellows and junior faculty.

Dr. Little’s current research is focused on the use of molecular epidemiologic methods to infer and characterize HIV transmission networks and the potential of prevention and treatment interventions to reduce network incidence.