Abstract Formats

Abstracts submitted to the 2019 National HIV Prevention Conference can be structured as scientific research findings, programmatic summaries, or storytelling sessions.

Scientific or programmatic abstracts can be presented as oral presentations, panel presentations, or poster presentations.

Storytelling sessions are new to NHPC and will feature personal stories of learning and discovery in HIV prevention. Abstracts submitted for Storytelling Sessions must also include a brief video of the presenter sharing a dynamic presentation or story. See the Presentation Types section for more details.

FORMAT I — SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH FINDINGS

Overview

This format is most appropriate for the presentation of scientific or clinical research findings.

NOTE: The abstract should disclose primary findings and not include statements such as “experiment in progress” or “results are forthcoming.”

The abstract must include the following elements:

  • Background: Study objectives, the hypothesis to be tested, or a description of the problem.
  • Methods: Methods used or approach taken.
  • Results: Specific results in summary form (with appropriate statistical analysis).
  • Conclusions/Implications: Discussion, implications (particularly for prevention programs), and conclusions.

Sample Abstract

Title: Factors Associated with Enrollment of MSM in Partner Services Programs in the United States, 2013

Author(s):

Shubha Rao, Wei Song, Mesfin Mulatu, Michele Rorie, John Gilford

Background: Approximately 40,000 new HIV infections are identified annually in the U.S. More than half of all new infections are among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (collectively referred to as MSM) who are at increased risk for sexually transmitted diseases. In 2011 in the U.S., black/African American MSM accounted for the largest estimated number and percentage of HIV diagnoses (11,805, 39%), followed by white MSM (10,375, 34%), and Hispanic/Latino MSM (6,949, 23%). CDC’s approach to addressing the HIV epidemic among MSM involves engaging communities and expanding prevention programs for disproportionately affected communities. Partner services (PS) programs are an integral component of this high-impact HIV prevention strategy.

Methods: We examined the demographic characteristics and risk behaviors of MSM by analyzing 2013 client-level data for index patients enrolled in PS. The data were submitted to CDC by 55 CDC-funded state and local health departments. The analytical sample consists of 27,914 index patients, excluding persons with missing data on gender and sexual risk. An index patient is categorized as MSM when the self-reported current gender is “male” and the self-reported behavior is “Sex with male”. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to identify demographic and risk factors associated with enrollment among MSM in PS.

Results: Of the 27,914 index patients who were contacted by health departments, 17,109 (61%) were MSM. Of these, 16,611 (97%) were located and 15,768 (95%) were enrolled. Among the non-MSM groups, 9,720 (90%) were located and 9,041 (93%) were enrolled in PS. MSM living in the Northeast (aOR=1.22, 95% CI=1.03-1.46) or West (aOR=3.63, 95% CI=3.10-4.26) were more likely to be enrolled in PS. MSM living in the South (aOR=0.61, 95% CI=0.52-0.71) were less likely to enroll in PS. Compared to whites, blacks/African Americans (aOR=0.71, 95% CI=0.63-0.78), Hispanics/Latinos (aOR=0.80, 95% CI=0.71-0.89) were less likely to be enrolled in PS. MSM who self-reported as having sex without a condom (aOR=0.77, 95% CI=0.70-0.84) were less likely to be enrolled in PS. There were no statistical differences between enrollment and age-groups or MSM who reported having a history of injection drug use.

Conclusions/Implications: More than 60% of PS clients are MSM, suggesting that PS programs are successfully reaching, locating and enrolling MSM. However, MSM enrollment varied significantly by demographic and risk characteristics. Understanding the factors associated with MSM enrollment is critical for designing interventions to increase access to PS and subsequently to HIV medical care, prevention, and support services.

Scoring Criteria (maximum 20 points)

  • Importance [All formats] (0-8 points)Innovation, relevance, creativity, new or cutting edge information, originality of approaches/interventions, significance or interest to the audience.
  • Methodology [Format I ] (0-7 points)Appropriateness of conceptual basis and design for the identified purpose of the study, appropriateness of the data collection techniques, development stage (level of data collection completeness).
  • Clarity [All formats] (0-5 points)Development of ideas and findings; communication of ideas and findings.
FORMAT II – PROGRAMMATIC SUMMARY

Overview

This format is most appropriate for description of programs or other HIV/AIDS prevention and care activities.

The abstract must include the following elements:

  • Issue: Identify the specific problems or needs addressed.
  • Setting: Geographic location, description of where intervention takes place, and intended audience.
  • Project: Description of the program or model.
  • Results: Specific quantifiable results in summary form.
  • Lessons Learned: Summary of the lessons learned and implications (particularly for prevention programs).

Sample Abstract

Title: Understanding and Addressing the Multiple Dimensions of Stigma to Promote Engagement in HIV Care for Homeless Populations

Author(s):

Serena Rajabiun, Manisha Maskay, Kate Franza, Ruthanne Marcus

Issue: Several studies have documented the role of stigma in both delaying HIV testing, and failure to enter or initiate care and poorer adherence to HIV care and treatment. For persons living with HIV who are homeless or unstably housed additional factors such as substance use and mental illness may also compound stigma and affect access to and receipt of quality of care. The presentation will review study methodology and initial data related to measuring stigma and the types of stigma experienced by HIV homeless unstably housed individuals, diagnosed with mental health and/or substance use disorders. It will also address strategies that may be used to help address stigma at the individual, community and systems level.

Setting: Nine clinic and community-based organizations across the US and one multisite coordinating center are funded by The Health Resources & Services Administration, HIV/AIDS Bureau through its Special Programs for National Significance (SPNS) as part of a national initiative focused on building medical homes for multiply diagnosed HIV-positive homeless/unstably housed populations.

Project: The demonstration projects implement and evaluate service delivery models aimed at achieving two main outcomes:1) increase engagement and retention in HIV care and treatment; and 2) improve housing stability for multiply diagnosed HIV-positive homeless/unstably housed populations. A key service delivery strategy is the use of patient navigators/care coordinators to engage and retain HIV homeless/unstably housed individuals in care and assist with multiple stigmas. This presentation will describe strategies used by the initiative to measure stigma, review initial results and describe some strategies that can be used to help clients in addressing stigma and building resilience.

Results: As part of a national multisite evaluation of engaging and retaining HIV homeless in care and treatment, a multidimensional measure of individual and provider level stigma addressing homelessness, substance use, mental illness and HIV was adapted and developed across six sites. The presentation will share preliminary baseline findings and discuss strategies to address stigma at the individual, community and systems level to promote linkage and engagement in HIV care.

Lessons Learned: Stigma is often cited as the reason why individuals resist getting HIV tests as well as accessing and/or treatment for HIV and mental health/substance abuse disorders. The multiple facets of stigma are however poorly understood and defined, thus making it difficult to address it at the individual, community or systems level. Learning about how to measure stigma, understanding the dimensions and determining effective strategies to help individuals to address stigma and build resilience is an important facet of enabling them to become engaged in care and treatment.

Scoring Criteria (maximum 20 points)

  • Importance [All formats] (0-8 points)Innovation, relevance, creativity, new or cutting edge information, originality of approaches/interventions, significance or interest to the audience.
  • Lessons Learned [Format II ] (0-7 points)Appropriateness of conceptual basis and design for the activity, extent to which the lessons learned advance the state of the art of HIV prevention, merit of the conclusions.
  • Clarity [All formats ] (0-5 points)Development of ideas and findings; communication of ideas and findings.
FORMAT III – STORYTELLING SESSION

Overview

This format is most appropriate for personal stories as told by one person. Stories should focus on failures or successes, and must convey to the audience lessons learned from the experience. Stories can be funny, serious, emotional, and/or practical, but they must be true. This format is being piloted in 2019 and may include additional training/workshops for the selected speakers.

NOTE: Abstract submissions for Storytelling Sessions require both the written abstract and a brief video showing a dynamic presentation or part of a story.

The abstract must include the following elements:

  • Set the Scene: What is your role and your surroundings during the time of the story.
  • Experience: What happened that made you think differently, try something new, etc.?
  • Lesson Learned: What did you take away from this?
  • Implications: What do you want others to take away from your story?

Sample Abstract

Sample abstract not available

Scoring Criteria (maximum 20 points)

  • Importance [All formats] (0-8 points)Innovation, relevance, creativity, new or cutting edge information, originality of approaches/interventions, significance or interest to the audience.
  • Relevance [Format III ] (0-7 points)The extent to which the story is inspiring, provides an authentic and unique perspective, and includes thoughtful lessons learned that can impact the HIV prevention field.
  • Clarity [All formats] (0-5 points)Development of ideas and findings; communication of ideas and findings.