National Survey of Long-term Care Providers

Newsletter

News from the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study

This website contains an archive of monthly newsletters that were distributed to subscribers of the Long-term Care Listserv. The listserv is a way to get information about activities, products and release dates for the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Survey (NPALS), formerly the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP).

MARCH, 2021

STATS OF THE MONTH

In recognition of National Kidney Month (March 2021), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP). (Note that starting in January 2020, NSLTCP was renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).)

Presentations

Singh, P., and Rome, V. Advancing Adult Day Services Research Using Data from the National Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Survey (NPALS). Presented at the National        Adult Day Services Association Research Summit Online. February 9-10, 2021.

Updates

  • Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available early in 2021.

Survey Data Collection

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has been fielding the fifth wave of the biennial National Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Study (NPALS), formerly the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP).  NCHS is asking Directors of residential care communities and adult day services centers that have been selected to participate in the study to complete and submit a questionnaire by web or mail.  We will be accepting questionnaires by mail and web until July, and starting in April, we will be calling respondents to give them the opportunity to complete by telephone.  To review the 2020 frequently asked questions, download samples of the questionnaires, and learn more about the study, visit NCHS’ NPALS website:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/index.htm.

The 2020 survey includes questions on COVID-19 experience. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, NCHS understands that services may be temporarily or permanently suspended, reduced, or offered through alternative methods, and fewer people may be receiving services on a regular basis. NCHS has made modifications to some of the questions to address these COVID-related irregularities.  We are asking providers to please complete the survey to the best of their ability.

Participation in this survey is voluntary but makes it possible to provide accurate and relevant findings to providers, policy makers, advocates, and researchers. Findings from previous survey waves can be accessed and downloaded from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/studyresults.htm at no cost.

 

 FEBRUARY, 2021

In recognition of American Heart Month (February 2021), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP). (Note that starting in January 2020, NSLTCP was renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).)

Updates

  • Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available early in 2021.
  • LTCSB staff will present information about the 2020 Adult Day Services Center Survey at the National Adult Day Services Association’s (NADSA) 2021 Virtual ADS Research Summit scheduled for February 10-11.  More information about the conference and the session entitled “Advancing Adult Day Services Research Using Data from the National Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Study” can be found here: https://www.nadsa.org/research/2021-virtual-research-summit/external icon

Survey Data Collection

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has begun fielding the fifth wave of the biennial National Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Study (NPALS), formerly the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP).  NCHS is asking Directors of residential care communities and adult day services centers that have been selected to participate in the study to complete and submit a questionnaire by web or mail.  To review the 2020 frequently asked questions, download samples of the questionnaires, and learn more about the study, visit NCHS’ NPALS website:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/index.htm.

The 2020 survey includes questions on COVID-19 experience. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, NCHS understands that services may be temporarily or permanently suspended, reduced, or offered through alternative methods, and fewer people may be receiving services on a regular basis. NCHS has made modifications to some of the questions to address these COVID-related irregularities.  We are asking providers to please complete the survey to the best of their ability.

Participation in this survey is voluntary but makes it possible to provide accurate and relevant findings to providers, policy makers, advocates, and researchers. Findings from previous survey waves can be accessed and downloaded from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/studyresults.htm at no cost.

 

January, 2021

2020 Year in Review

In 2020, the Long-Term Care Statistics Branch (LTCSB) at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released several publications using data from the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS) formerly known as the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP). The publications consisted of manuscripts and NCHS reports. Find these products at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/studyresults.htm or by selecting the publication links below.

Manuscripts

  1. Lendon, J.P., Caffrey, C., & Lau, D.T. (2020). Advance directives state requirements, center practices, and participant prevalence in adult day services centers: Findings from the 2016 National Study of Long-Term Care Providers. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa089external icon
  2. Lendon, J. P., Rome, V., & Sengupta, M. (2020). Variations Between Adult Day Services Centers in the United States by the Racial and Ethnic Case-Mix of Center Participants. Journal of Applied Gerontology. https://doi.org/10.1177/0733464820934996external icon

NCHS Reports

  1. Sengupta M, Caffrey C. Characteristics of residential care communities by percentage of resident population diagnosed with dementia: United States, 2016. National Health Statistics Reports; no 148. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/NHSR148-508.pdfpdf icon
  2. Rome V, Lendon JP, Harris-Kojetin L. Differences in characteristics of adult day services centers, by level of medical service provision. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 3(45). 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_03/sr03-45-508.pdfpdf icon
  3. Caffrey C, Cairns C, Rome V. Trends in electronic health record use among residential care communities: United States, 2012, 2014, and 2016. National Health Statistics Reports; no 140. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr140-508.pdfpdf icon

In January 2020, NSLTCP was renamed National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS) to better reflect the scope of NCHS’ study of long-term and post-acute care. This new name reflects the addition of more post-acute sectors (inpatient rehabilitation facilities and long-term care hospitals), while keeping the sectors (adult day services centers, assisted living and similar residential care communities, home health agencies, hospices, and nursing homes) that have been in the study since it launched in 2012. The information NCHS collects about adult day services centers and participants and residential care communities and residents remains the same. Similar to the 2012, 2014, and 2016 waves of NSLTCP, the 2020 wave of NPALS is designed to provide national and state-level estimates.

Data Collection Activities

NCHS has begun fielding the fifth wave of the biennial National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS). NCHS is asking Directors of residential care communities and adult day services centers that have been selected to participate in the study to complete and submit a questionnaire by web or mail. To review the 2020 frequently asked questions, download samples of the questionnaires, and learn more about the study, visit NCHS’ NPALS website: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/index.htm .

The 2020 survey includes questions on COVID-19 experience. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, NCHS understands that services may be temporarily or permanently suspended, reduced, or offered through alternative methods, and fewer people may be receiving services on a regular basis. NCHS has made modifications to some of the questions to address these COVID-related irregularities. We are asking providers to please complete the survey to the best of their ability.

Participation in this survey is voluntary but makes it possible to provide accurate and relevant findings to providers, policy makers, advocates, and researchers. Findings from previous survey waves can be accessed and downloaded from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/studyresults.htm at no cost.

Data Release

NCHS is in advanced stages of preparing restricted and public use data files for the survey components of the 2018 NSLTCP: adult day and residential care sectors. For the first time in 2018, NSLTCP collected person level data in addition to provider level data; and for the first time, NSLTCP will provide public use data files in addition to restricted data files. Unlike the previous waves of NSLTCP which provided national as well as state-level estimates, the 2018 data are nationally representative and do not provide state-level estimates. Restricted data files may be accessed through the Research Data Center.

LTCSB would like to thank you for following our listserv and for your continued use and support of NPALS. In 2021, LTCSB plans to begin publishing NSLTCP products using the 2017-2018 data. Please stay tuned. From all of us here at NCHS, LTCSB, we wish you a wonderful new year!

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP. To learn more about NSLTCP, please visit: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/about_npals.htm

 

December, 2020

In recognition of the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (December 3, 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP). (Note that starting in January 2020, NSLTCP was renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).)

New Products to be Released on December 4, 2020

Sengupta, M. Caffrey C, Characteristics of residential care communities by percentage of resident population with dementia: United States, 2016. National Health Statistics Reports; no 148. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/reports.htm

Updates

  • Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available early in 2021.

Survey Data Collection

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has begun fielding the fifth wave of the biennial National Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Study (NPALS), formerly the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP).  NCHS is asking Directors of residential care communities and adult day services centers that have been selected to participate in the study to complete and submit a questionnaire by web or mail.  To review the 2020 frequently asked questions, download samples of the questionnaires, and learn more about the study, visit NCHS’ NPALS website:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/index.htm.

The 2020 survey will include questions on COVID-19 experience. Due to COVID-19 pandemic, NCHS understands that services may be temporarily or permanently suspended, reduced, or offered through alternative methods, and fewer people may be receiving services on a regular basis. NCHS has made modifications to some of the questions to address these COVID-related irregularities.  We are asking providers to please complete the survey to the best of their ability.

Participation in this survey is voluntary but makes it possible to provide accurate and relevant findings to providers, policy makers, advocates, and researchers. Findings from previous survey waves can be accessed and downloaded from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/studyresults.htm at no cost.

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

November, 2021

In recognition of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Awareness Month (November) we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, 14.0% of residents in assisted living and similar residential care communities (RCCspdf icon) and 0% of participants in adult day services centers (ADSCspdf icon) had a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
  • In 2015, 31.9% of home health patients and 20.7% of hospice patients had a diagnosis of COPD.

Source: Long-term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016pdf icon

Updates

* Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate some estimates will be available by December 2020.

* Beginning January 2020, NSLTCP has been renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).

* Data collection for the 2020 NPALS is scheduled to begin in November 2020.

New Products

Lendon, J.P., Caffrey, C., and Lau, D.T. (2020). Advance directives state requirements, center practices, and participant prevalence in adult day services centers: Findings from the 2016 National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, The Journals of Gerontology: Series Bhttps://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbaa089external icon

Rome V, Lendon JP, Harris-Kojetin L. Differences in characteristics of adult day services centers, by level of medical service provision. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 3(45). 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_03/sr03-45-508.pdfpdf icon

 

Data tell stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from NPALS (formerly known as the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers)? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NPALS data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NPALS.

 WE WELCOME YOUR FEEDBACK ON THIS NEWSLETTER.

 

October 2020

In recognition of Mental Illness Awareness Week (October 4–10) we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, 87.6% of nursing homes, 55.0% of assisted living and similar residential care communities (RCCspdf icon), and 33.8% of adult day services centers (ADSCspdf icon) provided mental health or counseling services.
  • In 2015, 97.0% of hospices provided mental health or counseling services.

Source: Long-term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016pdf icon

Updates

* Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

* Beginning January 2020, NSLTCP has been renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).

* Data collection for the 2020 NPALS is scheduled to begin in November 2020.

 

September 2020

In recognition of National Assisted Living Week (September 8–14) we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, there were about 28,900 assisted living and similar residential care communities (RCCspdf icon) serving around 811,500 residents (estimates are rounded as whole numbers to the nearest hundred).

In recognition of National Adult Day Services Week (September 15–21) we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, there were about 4,600 adult day services centers (ADSCspdf icon) serving around 286,300 participants (estimates are rounded as whole numbers to the nearest hundred).

Source: Long-term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016pdf icon

Updates

* Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

* Beginning January 2020, NSLTCP has been renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).

* Data collection for the 2020 NPALS is scheduled to begin in November 2020.

 

August 2020

In recognition of National Seniors Day (August 21), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

In 2016:

  • 3% of participants in adult day services centers (ADSCs) were 65-74 years old, 25.9% were 75-84 years old, and 16.3% were 85 and over;
  • 2% of nursing home residents were 65-74 years old, 26.7% were 75-84 years old, and 38.6% were 85 and over; and
  • 0% of residents in assisted living and similar residential care communities (RCCs) were 65-74 years old, 30.3% were 75-84 years old, and 52.1% were 85 and over.

In 2015:

  • 8% of home health patients were 65-74 years old, 29.9% were 75-84 years old, and 25.2% were 85 and over; and
  • 5% of hospice patients were 65-74 years old, 29.3% were 74-84 years old, and 47.8% were 85 and over.

Source: Long-term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016

Updates

* Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

* Beginning January 2020, NSLTCP has been renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).

New Products

Lendon, J. P., Rome, V., & Sengupta, M. (2020). Variations Between Adult Day Services Centers in the United States by the Racial and Ethnic Case-Mix of Center Participants. Journal of Applied Gerontology.https://doi.org/10.1177/0733464820934996external icon

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

July 2020

STATS OF THE MONTH

In recognition of National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month (July 1–31), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, 42.9% of participants in adult day services centers (ADSCs) where all participants were non-Hispanic white had a diagnosis of depression, compared with 29.0% of participants in ADSCs where all participants were either Hispanic, Black, Asian, American Indian and Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.
  • In 2016, 31.6% of residents in residential care communities (RCCs) where all residents were non-Hispanic white had a diagnosis of depression, compared with 31.4% of residents in RCCs where all residents were either Hispanic, Black, Asian, American Indian and Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.

Notes:

* Estimates from 2015-2016 Restricted survey files available through the NCHS Research Data Center (https://www.cdc.gov/rdc/index.htm).

* Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

* Beginning January 2020, NSLTCP has been renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

June 2020

In recognition of National HIV/AIDS Long-Term Survivors Day (June 5, 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, 0.4% of participants in adult day services centers (ADSCs) had a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, and about 0.8% of ADSCs primarily served participants diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, Adult Day Services Component: National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2015–2016 ).
  • In 2016, 0.3% of residents in residential care communities (RCCs) had a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, Residential Care Component: National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2015–2016).

Notes:

* Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

* Beginning January 2020, NSLTCP has been renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

May 2020

In recognition of National Asthma and Allergy Month (May 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, 8.3% of participants in adult day services centers (ADSCs) and 6.8% of residents in assisted living and similar residential care communities (RCCs) had a diagnosis of asthma. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016, Table VIII).
  • In 2015, 23.7% of home health patients and 8.4% of hospice patients had a diagnosis of asthma. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016, Table VIII)

Notes:

*Estimates are for the asthma diagnosis but not for other kinds of allergy.

**Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

April 2020

In recognition of National Physical Therapy Month (April 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

  • In 2016, 99.5% of nursing homes, 71.4% of assisted living and similar residential care communities (RCCs), and 46.7% of adult day services centers (ADSCs) provided therapeutic services. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016, Table VIII).
  • In 2015, 98.2% of hospices and 96.3% of home health agencies provided therapeutic services. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, 2015-2016, Table VIII)

In recognition of Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month (April 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 NSLTCP:

  • In 2016, 4.7% of ADSCs specialized in serving participants diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. (From the Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States, Adult Day Services Component: National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2015-2016).

**Note: Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

The National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Announces a New Name

In January 2020, the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers was renamed the National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS). In the spirit of transparency, this new name reflects the addition of more post-acute sectors (inpatient rehabilitation facilities and long-term care hospitals), while keeping the same sectors that have been in the study since it launched in 2012 (adult day services centers, assisted living and similar residential care communities, home health agencies, hospices, and nursing homes). The survey information NCHS plans to collect about adult day services centers and participants and residential care communities and residents will not change. Please contact us at ltcsbfeedback@cdc.gov with your questions about this exciting change. To learn more about NPALS, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/npals/about_npals.htm

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

March 2020

STATS OF THE MONTH

  In recognition of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Month (March 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

In recognition of Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month (March 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 NSLTCP:

**Note: Data for the 2018 study are being processed and we anticipate estimates will be available in the fall of 2020.

 NEW PRODUCTS

Caffrey C, Cairns C, Rome V. Trends in electronic health record use among residential care communities: United States, 2012, 2014, and 2016. National Health Statistics Reports; no 140. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020.

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

February 2020

STATS OF THE MONTH

In recognition of American Heart Month (February 2020), we present estimates from the 2015–2016 National Study of Long–Term Care Providers (NSLTCP):

Data Tell Stories. Tell Us Yours! How have you used information from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers? Email us a brief description at LTCSBFeedback@cdc.gov. In the subject field of your email, write “My NSLTCP data use example”. Your examples will help us showcase the value of NSLTCP.

 

January 2020

Year in Review

In 2019, the Long-Term Care Statistics Branch (LTCSB) at the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) released several publications using data from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP). The publications consisted of manuscripts, NCHS reports, and state estimates tables.

Find these products at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm, or by selecting the publication name in the list below. Please contact us at 301-458-4747 or at ltcsbfeedback@cdc.gov if you have any questions about these products.

The 2018 NSLTCP data collection activity ended in February 2019. Currently, NCHS is preparing restricted and public use data files for the survey components of the 2018 NSLTCP: adult day and residential care sectors. For the first time in 2018, NSLTCP collected person level data in addition to provider level data; and for the first time, NSLTCP will provide public use data files in addition to restricted data files. Unlike the previous waves of NSLTCP which provided national as well as state-level estimates, the 2018 data are nationally representative and do not provide state-level estimates. Restricted data files may be accessed through the Research Data Center.

In 2020, NSLTCP is getting a new name to better reflect the scope of NCHS’ study of long-term and post-acute care.

  • In January, NSLTCP will be renamed National Post-acute and Long-term Care Study (NPALS).
  • This new name reflects the addition of more post-acute sectors (inpatient rehabilitation facilities and long-term care hospitals), while keeping the same sectors that have been in the study since it launched in 2012 (adult day services centers, assisted living and similar residential care communities, home health agencies, hospices, and nursing homes).
  • The information NCHS plans to collect about adult day services centers and participants and residential care communities and residents will not change.
  • Similar to the 2012, 2014, and 2016 waves of NSLTCP, the 2020 wave of NPALS is designed to provide national and state-level estimates.
  • Please contact ltcsbfeedback@cdc.gov with questions about this exciting change.

After 13 years of outstanding leadership, Lauren Harris-Kojetin, Ph.D., has stepped down as Chief of LTCSB. Denys T. Lau, Ph.D., Director, Division of Health Care Statistics, will serve as LTCSB Acting Chief in the meantime.

LTCSB would like to thank you for following our listserv and for your continued use and support of NSLTCP. In 2020, LTCSB plans to begin publishing NSLTCP products using the 2017-2018 data. Please stay tuned. From all of us here at NCHS LTCSB, we wish you a wonderful new year!

 

Publications from the National Study of Long-term Care Providers in 2019

Manuscripts

  • Park-Lee E & Sengupta M. (2019). Injurious falls, hospitalizations, and emergency department visits among residential care residents with cognitive impairment: Adverse outcomes in dementia special care units (DSCU) versus non-DSCU settings. Seniors Hous Care J, 27(1), 3-15.
  • Rome V, Harris-Kojetin L & Carder, P. (2019). Variation in licensed nurse staffing characteristics by state requirements in residential care. Res Gerontol Nurs, 12(1), 27-33. https://doi.org/10.3928/19404921-20181212-03external icon
  • Sengupta M, Zimmerman S, and Harris-Kojetin L. (2019). Activity engagement in residential care settings: Findings from the National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. J Hous Elderly, 33(2), 120-139. https://doi.org/10.1080/02763893.2018.1534178external icon

NCHS Reports

  • Caffrey C, Lendon JP. Service provision, hospitalizations, and chronic conditions in adult day services centers: Findings from the 2016 National Study of Long-Term Care Providers. National Health Statistics Reports; no 124. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr124-508.pdfpdf icon
  • Harris-Kojetin L, Sengupta M, Lendon JP, Rome V, Valverde R, Caffrey C. Long-term care providers and services users in the United States, 2015–2016. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 3(43). 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_03/sr03_43-508.pdfpdf icon

State Estimates Tables

Lendon JP, Sengupta M, Rome V, Caffrey C, Harris-Kojetin L, Melekin A. Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States—State Estimates Supplement: National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2015–2016. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nsltcp/2016_CombinedNSLTCPStateTables_opt.pdfpdf icon

Page last reviewed: March 19, 2021