New CDC Data Reveal Less Than a Third of People Diagnosed with Hepatitis C Receive Timely Treatment

August 9, 2022 – Large gaps in hep C treatment persist nearly a decade after a highly effective cure for this deadly infection was approved

A new CDC Vital Signs report finds that too few people diagnosed with hepatitis C are being treated, even though hepatitis C is largely curable. According to CDC’s estimates, overall, less than 1 in 3 people with health insurance receive direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C within a year of diagnosis. Treatment is even lower among people who are Medicaid recipients, those living in states with Medicaid treatment restrictions, and among adults under the age of 40.

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Timely Hepatitis C Treatment by Insurance Type

Less than 1 in 3 people with health insurance get direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment for hepatitis C within a year of diagnosis. Treatment is lowest among patients in state-administered Medicaid plans, with less than 1 in 4 Medicaid recipients (23%) being treated within a year of diagnosis.


Hepatitis C Treatment Barriers

Currently, people with hepatitis C face too many  barriers to accessing life-saving treatment.


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Casos semanales reportados de ETS en EE.UU.: 2020 comparado al 2019

En general, menos de 1 de cada 3 personas con seguro médico recibe tratamiento antiviral de acción directa (DAA, por sus siglas en inglés) para la hepatitis C dentro del año después del diagnóstico. El menor tratamiento ocurre entre los pacientes en planes de Medicaid administrados a nivel de estado, con menos de 1 de cada 4 beneficiarios de Medicaid (23 %) siendo tratados dentro del año después del diagnóstico.

Page last reviewed: August 9, 2022