2019 National HIV Surveillance System Reports

May 27, 2021 – Hopeful signs of progress in HIV prevention, but gains remain uneven

New CDC data show new HIV infections fell 8% from 2015 to 2019, after a period of general stability in new infections in the U.S. Much of this progress was due to larger declines among young gay and bisexual men in recent years. From 2015 to 2019, new infections among young gay and bisexual men (ages 13-24) dropped 33% overall, with declines in young men of all races, though African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos continue to be severely and disproportionately affected.

The data suggest recent progress is likely due to increased uptake of key prevention and treatment strategies. In 2019, nearly 23% of people eligible for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) were prescribed it. This represents substantial progress – a previous CDC report showed that percentage was roughly 3% in 2015. In 2019, 66% of people with diagnosed HIV were virally suppressed and 81% of people with diagnosed HIV were rapidly linked to care within one month of diagnosis in 45 U.S. jurisdictions. While not directly comparable due to a differing number of jurisdictions with complete data (38 in 2015 vs. 45 in 2019), a previous CDC report showed that 60% of people were virally suppressed and 75% were rapidly linked to care in 2015.

However, to reach the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. goals, addressing continued disparities will be crucial. African Americans continue to face rates of infection that are more than 8 times as high as whites, and Hispanics/Latinos face rates that are almost 4 times as high, in large part because they experience the greatest barriers to accessing prevention and care services.

Through Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S., CDC is working with partners to accelerate progress by delivering key prevention strategies in innovative ways to the populations hardest hit by HIV. As the nation recovers from COVID-19, increasing access to HIV prevention and treatment through Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. remains an urgent priority – as far too many have not yet been reached with the strategies we know work.

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Annual HIV Infections in the U.S., 2015-2019

The graphic states that new HIV infections fell 8% from 2015 to 2019, after a period of general stability.

The line graph shows there were 37,800 new HIV infections in 2015, 37,900 in 2016, 36,700 in 2017, 36,200 in 2018, and 34,800 in 2019.

The line graph also shows that the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. target goal is to decrease the number of new HIV infections to fewer than 3,000 per year.


PrEP Coverage in the U.S. by Race/Ethnicity, 2019

The graphic states that while 23% of people eligible for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) were prescribed it in 2019, coverage is not equal.

The bar graph shows that in 2019, only 8% of African Americans and 14% of Hispanics/Latinos who were eligible for PrEP were prescribed it, compared to 63% of whites.

The bar graph also shows that the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. target goal is 50% PrEP coverage by 2030.


Viral Suppression Rates in the U.S. by Race/Ethnicity, 2019

The graphic states that even though 66% of people with HIV were virally suppressed in 2019, disparities remain.

The bar graph shows that just 61% of African Americans and 65% of Hispanics/Latinos with diagnosed HIV were virally suppressed, compared to 71% of whites.

The bar graph also shows that the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. target goal is 95% viral suppression by 2030.

Page last reviewed: May 27, 2021