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World TB Day

March 22, 2018 – Latest analysis of tuberculosis trends shows continued decline in the U.S., but progress toward elimination is slowing.

New preliminary data released today by CDC show tuberculosis (TB) cases declining in the U.S, but at a rate too slowly to eliminate TB during this century. In 2017, 9,093 new cases of TB were reported in the U.S, a 1.8 percent drop from the prior year. However, the current TB rate (2.8 cases per 100,000 persons) remains at levels 28 times higher than the TB elimination target rate.

Resources:

Graphics – New CDC Data for TB in the U.S.

From this page, you may download graphics highlighting major findings from CDC’s preliminary analysis of 2017 national surveillance data. For your convenience, we have included a table that contains the specific data from the report used to generate these charts.
These images are in the public domain and are thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy, we request that the content provider be credited and notified of any public or private usage of an image.

10/22/18 – Updated graphics with the final 2017 surveillance data can be found on the TB multimedia resources page.

This bar chart shows trends in the number of reported TB cases in the US from 1992 to 2017.  Starting with the peak of a resurgence of the disease in 1992, the chart shows a decline in the number of TB cases reported every year from 1992 to 2014, with a slight uptick in cases in 2015 (9,547).  Preliminary 2017 data and analysis of trends indicate slight declines in TB cases. A magnified view of 2012 to 2017 shows the slow progress of declines.

Trends in TB Cases, 1992-2017

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A total of 9,093 TB cases were reported in the United States in 2017 according to preliminary data from the CDC National TB Surveillance System. This analysis of TB trends in the United States indicates progress is slowing.

This line graph shows the TB rates in the United States between 1982 and 2017. There was a resurgence of TB in the mid-1980s with several years of increasing case counts until its peak in 1992. In 1993, case counts began decreasing again. While overall rates have declined since the peak, the decline has slowed significantly from 2012-2017. This slow progress threatens the realization of TB elimination in this century.

TB Rates in the United States, 1982-2017

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View Data Table

In 2017, preliminary data indicate a rate of 2.8 per 100,000 population. This is the lowest rate on record, representing a 2.5% decrease in from 2016 to 2017. However, the TB rate remains at levels 28 times higher than the TB elimination target rate.

This line graph shows the reported TB cases in the United States between 1982 and 2017. There was a resurgence of TB in the mid-1980s with several years of increasing case counts until its peak in 1992. In 1993, case counts began decreasing again. While overall reported case counts have declined since the peak, the decline has slowed significantly from 2012-2017. This slow progress threatens the realization of TB elimination in this century.

Reported TB Cases in the United States, 1982-2017

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View Data Table

In 2017, preliminary data indicate that 9,093 new TB cases were reported in the United States, representing a decrease in case count of 1.8% from 2016 to 2017. This is the lowest case count and rate on record.

This graphic is a 3D rendering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Illustration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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Audio Clips: Dr. Jonathan Mermin Discusses World TB Day

Below are audio clips featuring NCHHSTP Director Jonathan Mermin, MD, MPH. To save the audio clip, right click the audio player and select the “Save audio as…” option.

World TB Day Full Audio

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On World TB Day

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Approach to Progress

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Technology

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TB Elimination

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