CDC's Viral Hepatitis Work Saves Lives and Money

CDC's Hepatitis Works Saves Lives and Money

CDC’s Viral Hepatitis Work Saves Lives and Money

2.4 million adults in the U.S. living with hepatitis C in 2016

862,000 adults in the U.S. living with hepatitis B in 2016

30,500+ people have been infected in multiple hepatitis A outbreaks since 2016

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From 2010-2017, new hepatitis C infections nearly quadrupled.

LIVES

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Screening all baby boomers (born 1945-1965) just once would identify 800,000 living with chronic hepatitis C but unaware of their infection

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Implementing CDC’s recommendations for hepatitis C testing and linkage to care and curative treatment could save 320,000 lives

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From FY2013-2019, CDC responded to 203 requests for viral hepatitis laboratory investigation and the laboratory performed 223,983 tests.

MONEY

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Vaccination against hepatitis B is cost-saving to the healthcare system and remains the most cost-effective strategy toward hepatitis B elimination

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CDC invests over $20 million in state, tribal, local, and territorial support for viral hepatitis response

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$6.5 billion: estimated total healthcare costs associated with hepatitis C infection in 2011

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The average cost of curing people with hepatitis C is not only cost-effective, but cost-saving to the healthcare system

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PROJECT SPOTLIGHT:

Two community-based projects funded by CDC provided a model for test and treat/cure strategies for the nation.

Hepatitis C: Over three years, CDC’s Community-based Programs to Test and Cure Hepatitis C project saw 300,963 hepatitis C tests performed; 15,736 people diagnosed with hepatitis C infection; 4,988 already prescribed treatment; and 342 providers trained to treat patients with hepatitis C.

Hepatitis B: Over three years, CDC’s Community-Based Services to Improve Testing and Linkage to Care Among Non–U.S.-Born Persons with Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection project saw 10,152 program participants; 757 people tested positive for chronic hepatitis B infection; 643 attended one or more medical visit; and 587 received care for their hepatitis B.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

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Page last reviewed: February 6, 2020