CDC's STD Work Improves Health and Saves Money

CDC's STD Work Saves Lives and Money

CDC’S STD WORK IMPROVES HEALTH & SAVES MONEY

Millions of new STDs occur each year and about half are among young people 15-24 years old

In 2017, the rate of primary and secondary syphilis increased 14%, gonorrhea increased 5%, and chlamydia increased 3% above the 2016 rates

Without treatment, STDs can increase the risk of getting HIV, long-term pelvic/abdominal pain, and pregnancy complications or infertility in women.

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ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE: CDC continues to see warning signs that resistance is emerging — and that the threat of untreatable gonorrhea persists

 

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In 2018, rates of congenital syphilis —mothers passing syphilis to their babies—increased for the sixth year in a row with over 1,300 reported cases, including 78 stillbirths and 16 infant deaths

STDs HAVE REACHED THE HIGHEST REPORTED LEVEL EVER IN THE U.S

HEALTH

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CDC funds a large portion of the more than 1,600 disease intervention specialists (DIS) across the United States, who protect the health of the nation: DIS stop the spread of infections by finding people who are unaware of being exposed to an STD and connecting them to testing, medical care, and timely treatment, if needed.

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Every year, CDC supports 500 STD-prevention-related trainings for health care providers, providing the latest in STD prevention and treatment to more than 27,000 clinicians who care for individuals with STDs.

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CDC’s STD Treatment Guidelines provide the most effective and up-to-date diagnoses and treatment recommendations. These guidelines help ensure clinicians can treat gonorrhea effectively to combat increasing signs of antibiotic resistance. In the three years since CDC issued the current recommendation, patients receiving it have had no treatment failures.

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In the past 15 years, CDC-funded STD programs prevented an estimated 5.6 million cases of gonorrhea, syphilis, and chlamydia, and 3,200 STD-attributable HIV infections, saving an estimated $2.4 billion in lifetime medical costs

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Americans who have an STD are at an increased risk of acquiring HIV; each year there are approximately 5,000 STD-attributable HIV cases, at a cost of $2 billion

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WE MUST DO MORE TO PREVENT SYPHILIS AND GONORRHEA

A CDC study suggests that investing just 10 cents per person per year in syphilis prevention can decrease the number of syphilis cases by over 30 percent

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Preventing the emergence of antibiotic resistance can potentially avert hundreds of millions of dollars in direct medical costs of gonorrhea and gonorrhea-attributable HIV infections

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

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Page last reviewed: February 6, 2020