Virginia: Vector-borne Diseases Profile (2004-2018)

Highlight: 2018

Top mosquito-borne disease:

Malaria

Top tickborne disease:

Lyme disease

Total vector-borne disease cases - 1,632 tickborne disease cases, 139 mosquito-borne disease cases

Mosquito-borne and tickborne disease cases, 2004-2018

Mosquito-borne and tickborne disease cases, 2004-2018

About the data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, Annual Tables of Infectious Disease Data. Atlanta, GA. CDC Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance, 2005-2018.

Data table excel icon[CVS – 243 B]

Percentage of vector control programs ranked as "fully capable" or "competent" by state

This is a map depicting the percentage of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or competent by state. The key is separated into five values. The values are: Slashed lines for 0% of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or competent consisting of Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, and West Virginia. Lightest blue for 1% to 20% of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or competent consisting of Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.  Second lightest blue for 21% to 40% of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or competent consisting of California, Florida, Massachusetts, Nevada, Texas, and Utah. Third lightest blue for 41% to 60% of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or competent consisting of Louisiana and Oregon. Second darkest blue for 61% to 80% of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or competent consisting of no states. Darkest blue for 81% to 100% of vector control programs ranked as fully capable or “competent consisting of Delaware and Hawaii.

National Association of County and City Health Officials. NACCHO Report: Vector Control Assessment in Zika Virus Priority Jurisdictions. 2017 pdf icon[PDF – 25 pages] [cited 2018 March 19, 2018]external icon (CDC, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, GRASP)

Virginia is vulnerable. State and local public health agencies can help address the growing threat:

Print the Virginia fact sheet pdf icon[PDF – 1 page]