CASPERs in Michigan

2018 — Poverty and Disability affects Emergency Readiness

Type: Preparedness

Location: Detroit

Purpose: The City of Detroit is an example of a community with above average disability and poverty rates.  In 2016, 21.7% of the population in Detroit had a disability and 39.4% were living at or below poverty level. Research shows that those living in poverty have a higher risk of having a disability because they have more limited access to basic necessities (clean water, health care) are more likely to live in more dangerous environments (low quality housing, closer to natural disaster zones and environmental hazards) and are more likely to accept high risk jobs. People with a disability have a higher chance of living in poverty due to higher costs of living as it relates to medical care and the limited opportunities that may occur due to the disability. Therefore, disability can be viewed as both a cause and consequence of poverty.

The objectives of the CASPER was to assess the level of household emergency preparedness in the City of Detroit, Michigan: 1) the types of emergency preparations households have in place; 2) the frequency of households with residents who may have special medical needs in an emergency because of health conditions; 3) the most trusted and main sources of information for a household during any kind (man-made and natural) emergency; 4) the likelihood that households would follow public health instructions following a disaster or evacuation; including transportation needs and 5) the frequency of households that would need to care for a pet or a non-household dependent during an emergency. A final objective was to provide knowledge transfer and capacity building for the state and local public health partners in terms of disaster preparedness and response epidemiology


2016 – Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) After the Flint Water Crisis: May 17−19, 2016

Type: Recovery
Location: Flint, MI
Purpose: To aid in the recovery efforts following the Flint water crisis, a CASPER was conducted May 17−19, 2016 within the City of Flint, Michigan. Specifically, the CASPER was conducted to assess the following: 1) household- and individual-level, self-reported behavioral health concerns; 2) household access to behavioral health services, including substance abuse and mental health services, and perceived barriers to access; 3) self-reported physical health concerns; 4) water-related resource needs and barriers to resources; and 5) communication with the affected community.
Report: CASPER – After the Flint Water Crisis Report: May 17−19, 2016 pdf icon[PDF – 1 MB]
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2012 – Household Emergency Preparedness

Type: Preparedness
Location: Oakland County
Purpose: Assess the level of household emergency preparedness in Oakland County, including radiation emergency preparedness due to their proximity to the Fermi Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the CASPER were to assess the following: 1) the types of emergency preparations households have in place; 2) the frequency of households with residents who may have special medical needs in an emergency because of health conditions; 3) the most trusted and main sources of information for a household during a radiation emergency; 4) the likelihood that households would follow public health instructions following a disaster involving radiation; and 5) the frequency of households that would need to care for a pet or a non-household dependent during an emergency. A final objective was to provide knowledge transfer and capacity building for the state and local public health partners in terms of disaster preparedness and response epidemiology.
Report: http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mdch/MI_CASPER_Report_FINAL_02112013_413612_7.pdf pdf icon[PDF – 740 KB]external icon


Page last reviewed: May 8, 2018