What do EIS officers do at NCEH/ATSDR?

Matt Karwowski (EIS ’14) assesses a water bladder used to supply water to Sierra Leone village under quarantine for Ebola Virus Disease

Matt Karwowski (EIS ’14) assesses a water bladder used to supply water to Sierra Leone village under quarantine for Ebola Virus Disease

EIS Officers are involved in a variety of opportunities, including leading epidemiological investigations, analyzing large national datasets, serving as technical advisors, and responding to requests for assistance from state, local, tribal, territorial, and international governments.

EIS Officers are placed in the

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR)

National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)

Recent projects conducted by NCEH/ATSDR’s EIS Officers include:

Ellen Yard (EIS '09) checks water quality during flooding in Tennessee

Ellen Yard (EIS '09) checks water quality during flooding in Tennessee

  • Investigating undetermined risk factors for invasive mold infections in immunocompromised residents in Houston, Texas after Hurricane Harvey
  • Responding to a large-scale outbreak of acute gastroenteritis on a cruise ship
  • Investigating a Legionella outbreak at a racetrack in West Virginia
  • Leading an investigation of health effects following a natural gas pipeline explosion in Kentucky
  • Assisting the State of Illinois with an outbreak of severe bleeding in emergency room patients attributed to use of synthetic cannabinoids
  • Investigating lead poisoning in Flint, Michigan
  • Investigating lead poisoning due to artisanal gold mining in Zamfara State, Nigeria
  • Providing technical assistance in assessing unregulated drinking water use on tribal lands
  • Investigating associations between prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and cognitive development in young girls
  • Evaluating the surveillance of dietary supplement-induced liver injury by the National Poison Data System
  • Conducting a surveillance evaluation of the National Poison Data System for synthetic marijuana
  • Characterizing health effects of hand sanitizer ingestion among children
  • Evaluating the use of media reports for determining mortality rates during Hurricane Sandy
  • Exploring the relationship between CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index and disaster-related deaths using statistical and spatial methods
  • Assessing adverse health effects reported to the National Poison Data System from exposure to e-cigarettes
  • Creating a COVID-19 response webpage for patients with asthma
  • Conducting a Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) for rapid identification of disaster response and recovery needs of communities affected by the Elk River Chemical Spill
Ethan Fechter-Leggett (EIS ’13) and Olaniyi Olayinka (EIS ’13) during an investigation of an outbreak of severe-illnesses associated with the reported use of synthetic cannabinoids in Colorado

Ethan Fechter-Leggett (EIS ’13) and Olaniyi Olayinka (EIS ’13) during an investigation of an outbreak of severe-illnesses associated with the reported use of synthetic cannabinoids in Colorado

Amy Lavery (EIS ’17) and Jared Rispens (EIS ’18) respond to an outbreak on a cruise ship with CDC’s Vessel Sanitation Program

Amy Lavery (EIS '17) and Jared Rispens (EIS '18) responding to a cruise ship outbreak in Florida

David Bui (EIS ’19), Lindsay Tompkins (EIS ’19), and Esther Kukielka (EIS ’19) conduct interviews and trainings with local health department staff and response workers after a natural gas pipeline explosion in Kentucky.

David Bui (EIS ’19), Lindsay Tompkins (EIS ’19), and Esther Kukielka (EIS ’19) conduct interviews and trainings with local health department staff and response workers after a natural gas pipeline explosion in Kentucky.

You can read more about work and investigations conducted by EIS Officers at NCEH in the following articles:

Joy Hsu (EIS ’13) communicating with media during a field investigation of the public health effects of a chemical release in West Virginia

Joy Hsu (EIS ’13) communicating with media during a field investigation of the public health effects of a chemical release in West Virginia

You can solve a virtual outbreak by using the CDC iPad application: Solve the Outbreak at https://www.cdc.gov/mobile/Applications/sto/.

Page last reviewed: May 13, 2020