Adults with Heart Defects Are More Likely to Report Additional Cardiovascular Health Issues

Doctor is using a stethoscope listen to the heartbeat of a patient.

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that adults living with heart defects may be more likely than the general population to report additional cardiovascular issues such as heart failure and stroke. People living with heart defects should receive ongoing specialty medical care.

Read the full scientific article.

Main Findings

  • Scientists found that adults living with heart defects may be more likely than the general population to report additional cardiovascular issues such as heart failure and stroke.
  • People living with severe heart defects were more likely to have cardiac and other health issues, such as asthma and depression, than people living with non-severe heart defects. Severe heart defects include coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, and other critical congenital heart defects.
  • Heart defects are lifelong conditions that require ongoing specialty medical care. It’s important for people living with heart defects to talk with a heart doctor regularly to make the best possible choices for their health.

 About This Study

Scientists used data from CDC’s Congenital Heart Survey To Recognize Outcomes, Needs, and well-beinG (CH STRONG)external icon to look at certain health conditions among adults aged 20–38 years with heart defects who were born in Arizona, Arkansas, and metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia.

About Heart Defects

Congenital heart defects are conditions present at birth that affect the structure of a person’s heart and its ability to work properly. Lifelong cardiac care can help people with heart defects live as healthy a life as possible.

Our Work

CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD(/ncbddd/index.html)) is tracking the number of people living with heart defects to learn about their long-term health, healthcare use, and quality of life. This information can help identify opportunities to support the health and wellness of all people living with heart defects.

More Information

Reference

Oster M, Riser A, Andrews J, Bolin E, Galindo M, Nembhard W, Rose C, Farr S. Comorbidities among young adults with congenital heart defects: Results from the Congenital Heart Survey To Recognize Outcomes, Needs, and well-beinG — Arizona, Arkansas, and Metropolitan Atlanta, 2016–2019. MMWR. 2021 Feb 12;70(6):197–201.