Statistics Highlight

  • chart showing the percentage of U.S. women aged 50–74 years had ever been told they had breast cancer.

    During 2015–2017, 5.3% of U.S. women aged 50–74 years had ever been told they had breast cancer.

  • Non-Hispanic white women were more likely to have ever been told they had breast cancer (6.1%) compared with Hispanic women (3.2%) and non-Hispanic black women (3.6%).
  • There was no significant difference in the prevalence of breast cancer between Hispanic and non-Hispanic black women.

* 95% confidence intervals indicated with error bars.

† Based on the questions “Have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you had cancer or a malignancy of any kind?” and “What kind of cancer was it?”

§ Refers to persons who are of Hispanic or Latino origin and may be of any race or combination of races. “Non-Hispanic” refers to persons who are not of Hispanic or Latino origin, regardless of race.

¶ Estimates are based on household interviews of a sample of the civilian, noninstitutionalized U.S. population and are derived from the National Health Interview Survey.

Sources: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017 combined.

  • chart showing the percentage of Emergency Department (ED) Visits† Made by Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease§ Among Persons Aged ≥18 Years, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex.

    During 2015–2016, 3.5% of adult visits to the ED were made by those with chronic kidney disease.

  • A higher percentage of visits were made by men with chronic kidney disease than women (4.1% compared with 2.7%). The same pattern was observed for non-Hispanic black men (5.0%) and women (2.4%).
  • Although the pattern was similar, there was no statistically significant difference in ED visits by sex for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults.

* With 95% confidence intervals indicated with error bars.

† Based on a sample of visits to EDs in noninstitutional general and short-stay hospitals, exclusive of federal, military, and Veterans Administration hospitals, located in the 50 states and District of Columbia. The “All visits” group includes all racial/ethnic groups, not just non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, and Hispanic.

§ Defined as ED visits made by patients with documentation in the medical record of a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease, regardless of the diagnosis for the current visit.

Sources: National Center for Health Statistics, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015–2016.

Page last reviewed: March 18, 2019