Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH

Lead, Community Interventions for Infection Control Unit Division of Global Migration and Quarantine

Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH

Amra Uzicanin, MD, MPH has been leading the Community Interventions for Infection Control Unit (CI-ICU) since its inception in 2010 as the new group at CDC dedicated to developing the scientific evidence base and policies for use of non-pharmaceutical interventions for infectious disease control in community settings with a focus on pandemic influenza. During the CDC response to pandemic influenza threats and in functional exercises, Dr. Uzicanin leads the CDC’s Community Mitigation Task Force which is one of six task forces comprising CDC’s pandemic influenza response. Dr. Uzicanin’s scientific work on pandemic influenza started during the CDC response to the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, when she helped design and complete a U.S. school-based evaluation of the pandemic vaccine effectiveness. She has authored over 90 scientific publications and peer-reviewed abstracts.

Dr. Uzicanin obtained her medical degree from the University in Sarajevo, Bosnia, received the Master of Public Health degree from the Emory University in Atlanta, GA, and completed a two-year training in applied epidemiology at CDC as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer. Prior to taking on her current position, Dr. Uzicanin served 1998-2010 with CDC’s Global Immunization Division and conducted epidemiologic research related with global and regional measles and rubella control targets and the global polio eradication. Before joining CDC in 1998, Dr. Uzicanin was a practicing physician, and she served 1993-1998 with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) as medical coordinator in multiple countries affected by armed conflicts directing efforts to provide health care for refugees, internally displaced persons, and other vulnerable populations.

Page last reviewed: November 28, 2017