Graph showing deaths from all cancers combined from 1975 to 2008. Cancer death rates among men and women have been declining since the early 1990s. Among men, cancer death rates rose from 258 deaths per 100,000 men in 1975 to 280 in 1990 then declined rapidly to 216 in 2008. Among women, cancer death rates rose from 160 deaths per 100,000 women in 1975 to 175 in 1990 then declined slowly to 148 in 2008.

Chart comparing deaths from all cancers combined for period 1999–2003 with period 2004–2008 by sex and racial/ethnic group. Cancer death rates were highest for black men and black women in both time periods but these groups showed the largest decline from 1999 to 2008 compared with other racial and ethnic groups. White men 1999–2003: 239 per 100,000; White men 2004–2008: 220 per 100,000; Black men 1999–2003: 331 per 100,000; Black men 2004–2008: 295 per 100,000; American Indian/Alaska Native men 1999–2003: 192 per 100,000; American Indian/Alaska Native men 2004–2008: 190 per 100,000; Asian/Pacific Islander men 1999–2003: 145 per 100,000; Asian/Pacific Islander men 2004–2008: 135 per 100,000; Hispanic men 1999–2003: 166 per 100,000; Hispanic men 2004–2008: 149 per 100,000; White women 1999–2003: 163 per 100,000; White women 2004–2008: 153 per 100,000; Black women 1999–2003: 192 per 100,000; Black women 2004–2008: 178 per 100,000; American Indian/Alaska Native women 1999–2003: 142 per 100,000; American Indian/Alaska Native women 2004–2008: 138 per 100,000; Asian/Pacific Islander women 1999–2003: 99 per 100,000; Asian/Pacific Islander women 2004–2008: 94 per 100,000; Hispanic women 1999–2003: 109 per 100,000; Hispanic women 2004–2008: 102 per 100,000.