Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

PCD News Summary for October 19, 2017

PCD logo - preventing chronic disease

About the Journal: Published every Thursday, Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) is a peer-reviewed online journal established by CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The News Media Branch prepares press summary packets each week. To receive these press summaries on an embargoed basis, send an e-mail to media@cdc.gov. Please note that this e-mail list is for credentialed journalists only. All others, please visit Hookup to Health to sign up for e-mail updates.

Notice to News Media – PCD Release Time and Embargo Policy:
CDC’s News Media Branch releases to reporters the PCD media packet every Tuesday afternoon between 12 and 2 pm.

Embargoed until Thursday, October 19, at 12:00 PM ET


Do Black Women’s Religious Beliefs About Body Image Influence Their Confidence in Their Ability To Lose Weight?

Black women’s religious views may influence their confidence in their ability to lose weight. In 2014, researchers recruited 240 church-affiliated black women aged 18 to 80 years from six black churches that participated in a larger study, Project FIT (Faith Influencing Transformation), a clustered, diabetes/heart disease/stroke intervention among black women and men. Baseline data from Project FIT was used to conduct a cross-sectional study consisting of a survey. Body mass index was associated with motivation to lose weight, and beliefs about body image in relation to God predicted confidence in ability to lose weight. Researchers suggest that faith-based, weight-loss interventions targeting black women should emphasize physical well-being and highlight the health benefits of weight management rather than the benefits of altering physical appearance.

Melissa Newton
mnewton@cdc.gov
404-718-6281


Prevalence of Single and Multiple Leading Causes of Death by Race/Ethnicity Among People Aged 60 to 70 Years

A study of chronic conditions and leading causes of death found that Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks were twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to die of complications related to diabetes. Researchers conducted a comprehensive assessment of how the leading causes of death in the United States differ among non-Hispanic blacks, non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanics according to age, sex, geographic region, and education level. They found that the prevalence of diabetes as a single condition and the combination of diabetes and cardiovascular disease were significantly higher among Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks than among non-Hispanic whites. Multiple chronic conditions, including cancer frequency, were highest among non-Hispanic whites. Racial differences in the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions differed more by education than by age group or sex.

Melissa Newton
mnewton@cdc.gov
404-718-6281


Mammography use in Portugal: Results from the National Health Survey 2014

Despite a 10 percent increase in mammogram screening among women in Portugal over the last decade, a considerable number of women have never had a mammogram or do not follow screening recommendations. Researchers showed that 96.2 percent of Portuguese women eligible for breast cancer screening in 2014 had ever received a mammogram, an increase of approximately 10 percent in mammography use since the 2005–2006 National Health Survey. However, a considerable percentage of women have never had a mammogram or did not follow screening. The prevalence of nonuse and underuse was lower among women aged 45 to 69, the age targeted for screening, than among women aged 30 to 44 and women aged 70 or older. Regional variations persisted, and patterns of mammography use differed according to sociodemographic characteristics and access to and use of health care services.

Melissa Newton
mnewton@cdc.gov
404-718-6281


Comparison of Methods for Estimating Prevalence of Chronic Diseases and Health Behaviors for Small Geographic Areas: Boston Validation Study, 2013

Model-based estimates of chronic disease and health behaviors are reliable and valid at the city level for certain health outcomes, allowing local health authorities to use neighborhood-level estimates if high quality local health survey data are not otherwise available. Population health measures at small geographic area levels help local governments with public health program planning, resource allocation, and health care decision making and delivery. However, county or sub-county-level population health data are typically not available or are less reliable because of small sample sizes. To meet growing needs, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed The 500 Cities Project which provides small-area estimates at the city and census-tract levels for various measures related to public health priorities and impact. This CDC study evaluated model-based estimates in The 500 Cities Project by comparing them with local survey data.

Melissa Newton
mnewton@cdc.gov
404-718-6281


 

###

Note: Not all articles published in PCD represent work done at CDC. In your stories, please clarify whether a study was conducted by CDC (“a CDC study”) or by another institution (“a study published by CDC”). The opinions expressed by authors contributing to PCD do not necessarily reflect the opinions of CDC or the institutions with which the authors are affiliated. PCD requests that, when possible, you include a live link to the article in your stories. 

###

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

TOP